Depend on the Text! How to Create Text-Dependent Questions

Depend on the Text! How to Create Text-Dependent Questions

About this Strategy Guide

Text-dependent questions require students to return to the text to support their answers. This rereading fosters deep thinking, the ultimate goal of text-dependent questions. With this strategy guide, you learn to prepare questions that challenge students to think at deeper levels each time they do a close reading.

Research Basis

Strategy in practice, related resources.

Close readings are an instructional strategy that promotes deep thinking as students reread and critically examine a text (Fisher & Frey, 2012). However, students do not automatically reread. Thus, teachers need to create and use text-dependent questions that redirect students to the text to provide evidence and support for their answers (Fisher, Frey, & Lapp, 2012). Teachers should prepare text-dependent questions in advance of the reading, considering questioning techniques such as question-answer relationships, questioning the author, and Bloom’s taxonomy to ensure deep thinking is achieved. While initial questions in a close reading may focus on the literal level, in subsequent readings questions require more advanced thinking. Across readings, questions should progress through general understanding, key details, vocabulary/text structure, author’s purpose, inferring, and forming arguments (Fisher & Frey, 2012; Fisher, Frey, & Lapp, 2012).

Before creating text-dependent questions, select a text that's complex quantitatively (readability levels), qualitatively (how language is used or knowledge demands placed on students), or complex based on your purposes. The text chosen for close reading should be more challenging than texts students encounter during other literacy activities. Your text-dependent questions should require students to think more deeply each time they reread this text.

To create text-dependent questions, do the following:

  • Determine how many days to devote to reading to ensure that questions progress from promoting general understanding to students forming and supporting opinions.
  • After the first reading, literal-level questions promote general understanding and focus on key textual details so students grasp the main idea. Examples include "Who's the main character? What information in the text lets you know this is the main idea?"
  • The second reading fosters deeper thinking, focusing attention on vocabulary, text structure, and author's purpose. Questions ask students to think about the author's decisions, to consider the purpose. Examples include "How do the words influence the book's meaning? How does the story change from beginning to end?"
  • On the third rereading, students answer questions requiring inferences and the formation of opinions and arguments about the text, using textual evidence for support. Examples include "What would logically happen next? What clues support your thinking? Do you agree/disagree with the author? Provide evidence for your answers."

This three-day model is a suggestion; as you become proficient in asking text-dependent questions, adjust the time based on the text and your students' needs. When planning, ensure your questions align with your text, highlighting specific aspects you want students to consider. Remember, using text-dependent questions in close readings should encourage critical thinking across additional reading experiences. As you complete close readings and students answer thought-provoking questions with textual evidence, these abilities will transfer to other literacy activities.

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How to Teach Text Dependent Analysis (TDA) The Easy Way

how to teach text dependent analysis strategies for tda

A TDA — or text-dependent analysis — is a common writing assessment administered by teachers and featured on state and national standardized tests. TDAs are administered to gauge a student’s ability to effectively complete a variety of writing tasks at a specific learning stage and within a given time period (usually around one hour).

Typically, a teacher will start by reading a question or statement that prompts the student to synthesize a response based on evidence within the text. Students use a variety of strategies to complete a TDA, including close reading , annotating, outlining, and revising based on feedback.

For many middle and high school students, the TDA is an introduction to lengthier writing assignments that require higher reading stamina, comprehension, and critical thinking skills to complete. Below, I’ve listed a few strategies for teachers to guide their students through the text-dependent analysis assignment and help them improve as writers.

It starts with a question — create specific prompts from relevant texts

From the start, instructor-designed questions should prompt students to synthesize their response based on evidence from the text. A TDA is analytical, not argumentative , and educators should emphasize the importance of interpreting the author’s intent behind a word, phrase, or writing choice, as opposed to sharing their personal opinions.

Teachers should ideally craft prompts that encourage student writers to do the following:

  • Go back to the text to search for evidence
  • Use appropriate evidence from the text to support their claims or ideas
  • Make connections between textual evidence and the real world or other texts
  • Form original or interesting insights

If a student can answer the question without engaging in any of the above bulleted thinking tasks, the TDA prompt is not an effective one.

TDA prompts are typically less than a paragraph. When crafting a prompt, aim for conciseness and specificity. Introduce the question or piece of text under consideration. Use strong action verbs — such as justify , interpret , evaluate , and compare — to communicate what it is you want a student to do in their response.

Often, a TDA may focus on a particular line or phrase. Instructors may find the backwards design process useful in creating strong TDA prompts. First, identify key points that students might glean from your selected text — many prompts focus on a particular theme , motif, or symbol that recurs throughout the passage. Then, ask what learning you want students to demonstrate — have you been working on drafting smooth transitions? Studying rhetorical choices in argumentative writing ?

Studying how a character’s point of view affects the overall meaning of a text? Your selected text should model the skill or standard that students are attempting to master. Finally, do your best to read your prompt through the lens of your students. Does the prompt make sense? Can they complete what you’re asking them to do within the given time frame? Is the prompt interesting? Students will more likely enjoy writing about what interests them versus content that they don’t connect with or understand.

Build the essay one piece at a time — model with low stakes assignments

A sufficient TDA response is usually 2+ single-spaced pages and composed of three parts:

  • A brief introduction
  • Well-developed body paragraphs
  • A concise conclusion

Within their given time range, students naturally spend the most time composing their body paragraphs; this is also the area where they typically experience the most challenges (particularly with more difficult reading passages). Depending on the grade and skill level of the students, it may be helpful to scaffold by modeling the TDA process with shorter reading passages. To make the writing process more approachable for novice writers, I suggest using a document camera and the 3 C’s approach to model effective analytical writing.

In the 3 C’s approach, students start a paragraph with the context , transition to relevant content , and expound by making a connection.

The context is a short, 1-2 sentence introduction to orient the reader to the part of the text that the reader is about to discuss. For example, if the TDA prompt asks students to identify why John Steinbeck uses personification to characterize Lenny in Of Mice and Men , the student writer might begin with the following context: “When the reader first encounters George and Lenny in the forest, Steinbeck compares Lenny’s behavior to a horse.”

After the writer quickly ‘transports’ the reader to the context of the story, they will next write their content, which is another term for textual evidence. Students can paraphrase or add direct quotations — regardless, they should make sure the content is integrated and avoid ‘quote-bombing’ an analytical paragraph. A quote-bomb is a writing error in which a writer includes a quote without any context or transition. It feels abrupt to a reader and may cause confusion. There are a variety of sentence stems that teachers can model to help students transition from one point to another. Teachers may find it helpful to create a one-page list of sentence starters that are useful for transitions within and between paragraphs.

The final C — or connection — is the most important part of the analytical paragraph, and should therefore be the most substantial. In the connection, the writer shares their interpretation of the textual evidence. Model possible text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections and have students choose which one makes the strongest point. After integrating a quote from Of Mice and Men that compares Lenny to a horse drinking water, the student writer might make a connection to a real-world context, like historical mental institutions, in which disabled persons were treated like animals and forced to live in inhumane conditions, or another character from a different book/film who shared similar behaviors and thought patterns with Lenny.

Your time starts now — begin with a plan

After sufficient practice with shorter analytical paragraphs, students will be ready to take on the TDA. Perhaps the most important strategy for teachers to model occurs before the student even picks up the pen to write their introductory paragraph. Educators should encourage students to use the first 5-10 minutes of a timed TDA to come up with a plan, following these steps:

  • Read and annotate the prompt — be clear on what it is actually asking you to do. Many students scan the prompt and receive lower grades on TDAs because their responses, while well-written, do not necessarily answer the prompt or question.
  • 00-05 Planning and outlining
  • 05-15 Reading and annotating
  • 15-50 Drafting
  • 50-60 Proofreading and revising

Students should be very familiar with annotating a text prior to commencing a TDA; they may benefit from an annotation symbol key to keep the annotation process quick and efficient during their timed assessment. Model strategies such as underlining possible pieces of textual evidence to use, or jotting out ideas in the margins for text-to-world connections. Remind students that it is okay if their planning process is messy. Writing is messy. We don’t come up with the right words in the right order the first time. Establishing an annotation system that works for them can help students synthesize information and complete their TDAs more efficiently.

End with the beginning — draft an effective introduction and conclusion

While students should spend the least amount of time drafting the beginning and end of their TDA, these sections can sometimes be the most tricky to write. Writers often struggle with what to say and how to say it.

The introduction houses the thesis statement, or central point that they will make in the analytical body paragraphs that follow. Many teachers find that students are redundant or overly wordy in these sections. For the introduction, model the three essential parts: hook, background, thesis. The hook should entice a reader to keep reading your piece. The thesis is the most important sentence in a TDA — it should be clear regarding the writer’s point and serve as a roadmap for where the remainder of the essay will take the reader. The background merely ties the hook to the thesis in an insightful, logical, or illuminating way.

Conclusions should avoid repeating what has already been said verbatim; however, writers should also avoid raising new considerations in the conclusion. So how to end on a good note? Consider nudging the writer to synthesize or focus on one of the text-based connections they made in their body paragraphs, and return to comment on that insight.

Make a nod to something that the author implied or stated in the text. Perhaps there is a lesson to be found for future readers that the student feels is valuable or significant. The teacher can model these different strategies for the same paragraph and show students how writing is so much more than pen to paper, but a series of big and small organizational and linguistic decisions that hopefully, when combined, will not only make sense to a reader, but compel them to think more deeply about an issue or problem in society.

Some teachers might find it useful to encourage students to tackle the introduction and conclusion after drafting their body paragraphs, since the body is where they will demonstrate most of their writing skills. It depends on the reader — encourage them to allot a short amount of time to the introduction and conclusion where it makes sense to do so in their writing process.

Delay the grade — encourage students to read and apply feedback

Time’s up! After a timed TDA, the teacher is likely to collect essays demonstrating a range of efforts and abilities. Some students may have resonated with the prompt and written several pages of content. Others may not have completed the assessment in full. Regardless of completion, educators should focus their feedback on what was provided (and not what wasn’t).

Students are motivated by grades for many reasons. Many educators also find that students do not take the time to read and apply feedback after they have already received a grade. For this reason, we encourage ‘delaying the grade’; meaning, provide detailed feedback for the student to digest and apply before you input a final grade. This practice conveys to students that (1) you, as a teacher, genuinely care about their improvement, and (2) you will base their next TDA grade partly on how well they applied their feedback from the previous one. By delaying the grade, you may find that students are more incentivized to correct their mistakes and invest in improving as writers.

The TDA can be used as a powerful instructional tool for just about any content area. By devising interesting and relevant prompts, teachers can prompt students to think deeply about a range of important issues. Brainstorming and creating an outline is applicable to so many content areas and real-world contexts. Modeling how to break down a task can reduce the anxiety that often accompanies more intimidating writing forms like the TDA and help a student make decisions that improve their efficiency. Using low stakes assignments to practice integrating context, content, and connection can build a student’s confidence up before they take on the lengthier TDA. The key to student improvement is receiving and applying constructive feedback.

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Many states have adopted a TDA (Text Dependent Analysis) style assessment for the writing component of their state test.  This type of writing style requires students to read a text or passage and use actual text to support their answers, citing specific evidence directly from the text.  Text-dependent analysis writing instructs students to provide specific evidence from the passages they read, while demonstrating the ability to interpret the meaning behind the evidence they provide.  How do you teach this kind of complex process to students?

TDA Questions List:

It’s important for you, as the teacher, to first generate a personal list of text-dependent questions/prompts prior to taking this process into the classroom.  You know your class and your standards.  What types of questions are most effective for your expectations and outcomes?  Write down as many text-dependent analysis, or TDA question/prompts as you can think of on a scratch piece of paper.  Then compare and/or combine your list of questions/prompts to this comprehensive list available for FREE in my VIP FREEBIE ALBUM . 

homework text dependent questions plan a plot

Begin by working as a whole group to come up with an acronym that encompasses the classroom TDA writing process.  Developing an acronym together will not only help students take ownership, but also give them a guide to remember HOW TO answer the questions.  Would you rather have an acronym prepared for your class?  No problem.  Work with ACE-  This is an acronym I use in my Text Evidence resource.  A-Answer the Question  C-Cite the Evidence  E-Explain your answer.  If time is a factor, you not have to reinvent the wheel!  You can find other examples of acronyms from teachers like RACE, WHIP, and QUAN on Pinterest.  These examples can be used with your class to use for HOW TO answer the questions or for brainstorming key ideas needed in your own acronym.  Here are some ideas to guide your students.:

  • Read the questions thoroughly to understand the important words.  Underline the keywords.
  • Answer the questions using prior knowledge and inferences/predictions.  Show understanding of the question by restating it in your answer.
  • Find evidence in the text to support your thoughts and opinions.  Note evidence to show proof of your answer.  Find facts, quotes, and data.
  • Explain in great detail by paraphrasing and directly quoting areas of the text. Extend your question.  How does your evidence support your answer?  What is your connection between your answer and the evidence? Be simple and to the point.  You don’t want to create an acronym with more than 4 letters, especially with elementary level students, but you want to have a comprehensive classroom guide for the process.

Student TDA Questions List:

Do the same activity from above with your students.  Ask them to write down as many TDA questions/prompts as they can think of in 5-10 minutes.  Allow them to work in pairs or groups, then work as a class to create a student-generated class list of questions/prompts.  Combine their list with your list.  Try to break the questions into sections (fictions, non-fiction, author’s purpose, etc) to make it easier in the future to find the appropriate questions/prompts based on the type of reading.  This activity will help students remember the questions they can ask themselves while reading a passage, which in turn will provide them with a deeper meaning of the text.

Brainstorm Sentence Starters:

Braintorm together sentence starters for providing text evidence in their writing.  For example:_____ quoted, “…”On page ____, it states…In paragraph ____, the text says…

The author wrote, “…”

The graphic/illustrations/map/chart indicate…

According to the text…

_____provides proof that…

From what I read in the text, I understand…

Based on _____ in the text, I think…

I think the author mean _____ because he/she says _____.

_____is an example of _____.

Post Acronym:

Be sure to post the class-generated acronym, prompts/questions, and useful resources in a plae where each student can see them clearly.  Create simple lists of questions/prompts and post them on your classroom walls.  Review them daily and before a TDA essay.  Repetition is an effective method for long-term memory!

Take notes:

Depending on what is best for your class, either have your students take notes on the resources or provide them with a small acronym anchor chart, a list of questions, and sentence starters for their reading notebook.  This TDA resource will be valuable for independent work and homework.

The first TDA should be done together as a class.  Read a text and write the essay together a whole group.  Students will be able to see a strong example of building an effective TDA essay writing piece.

Give students a text and allow them to use the TDA wall or student resources to guide them through the process.  You may want to begin with partner work and ease into independent work.

Fairy tales are quick reads, but they have  tons of elements  that make them  great for TDAs . Student experience with the structure and topics included in fairy tales will  give them  the  confidence  they need to  branch out  and  take risks  in their responses. Some ideas for daily TDAs with popular fairy tales might include the following:

One theme of “Cinderella” is to hold onto your dreams. Write an essay explaining how key details in the story support this theme. Use evidence from the story to support your answer.

How does the original wish of the King and Queen in “Sleeping Beauty” drive the plot of the story? Use specific evidence from the text to support your answer.

Try this TDA question stem for any fairy tale or multicultural version of a fairy tale students have not previously read: Can you tell if __________ describes a particular culture? How do you know? Would the story be different if set in a different culture/setting? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

Assessment:

Provide students with a TDA assessment.  Have them work independently without guidance.

Track your students’ progress.  This will be helpful when forming small groups and reteaching. I hope you learned some strategies to bring into your classroom!

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Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Upper Elementary

Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Upper Elementary

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Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Upper Elementary

Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Upper Elementary offers tips and ideas to help ensure your child's well-being. In today's fast-paced world, equipping children with the tools to navigate their emotions and relationships with their peers and the adults in their lives is more important than ever.

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ISBN: 9798765977224

Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Middle School

Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Middle School

Item: 151730

Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Middle School

Nurturing Your Child's Well-Being: Middle School offers tips and ideas to help you ensure your tween's well-being. In today's fast-paced world, equipping children with the tools to navigate their emotions and relationships with their peers and the adults in their lives is more important than ever.

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ISBN: 9798765977255

The Everything Guide to Phonics

The Everything Guide to Phonics

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The Everything Guide to Phonics is a comprehensive resource every teacher needs to implement effective phonics instruction in today's diverse classrooms.

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50 Strategies for Cooperative Learning

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Unlock the power of collaboration in the classroom! This guide includes easy-to-implement strategies for fostering an academically engaging and emotionally supportive learning environment where every student can thrive.

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180 Days of Math PK-8:  10-Book Set

180 Days of Math PK-8: 10-Book Set

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This comprehensive bundle include a 180 Days of Math book for grade beginning with PK and going up to 8th grade. This 10-Book Set includes 180 Days of Math for Pre Kindergarten, 180 Days of Math for Kindergarten, 180 Days of Math for First Grade, 180 Days of Math for Second Grade, 180 Days of Math for Third Grade, 180 Days of Math for Fourth Grade, 180 Days of Math for Fifth Grade, 180 Days of Math for Sixth Grade, 180 Days of Math for Seventh Grade, 180 Days of Math for Eighth Grade

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ISBN: 9798765963111

180 Days of Reading 2nd Ed Complete 10-Book Set

180 Days of Reading 2nd Ed Complete 10-Book Set

Item: 689766

Boost reading comprehension and word study skills for prekindergarten through eighth-grade students using daily practice activities at home or in a classroom. This easy-to-use 10-book set is aligned with college and career readiness and state standards.

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ISBN: 9798765973431

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EL Education Curriculum

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  • ELA 2019 G8:M1:U2:L2

Analyze Development of Theme and Summarize Summer of the Mariposas, Chapter 14

In this lesson, daily learning targets, ongoing assessment.

  • Technology and Multimedia

Supporting English Language Learners

Materials from previous lessons, new materials, closing & assessments, you are here:.

  • ELA 2019 Grade 8
  • ELA 2019 G8:M1
  • ELA 2019 G8:M1:U2

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Focus Standards:  These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RL.8.1, RL.8.2

Supporting Standards:  These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RL.8.4, RL.8.10, W.8.10, SL.8.1, L.8.4, L.8.6
  • I can demonstrate understanding of the excerpt of chapter 14 of Summer of the Mariposas .
  • I can determine a theme and analyze its development in Summer of the Mariposas , chapter 14. (RL.8.2)
  • I can write an objective summary of Summer of the Mariposas , chapter 14. (RL.8.1, RL.8.2)
  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket (RL.8.2)
  • Work Time B: Analyze the development of theme (RL.8.2)
  • Work Time C: Write a summary (RL.8.1, RL.8.2)
  • Closing and Assessment A: Review summaries (RL.8.1, RL.8.2)
  • Prepare Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 2.
  • Review the Development of Theme: Summer of the Mariposas note-catcher (for teacher reference) and the Objective Summary: Chapter 14 handout (for teacher reference).
  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 2 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: For students who will benefit from hearing the texts read aloud multiple times, use a text-to-speech tool such as Natural Reader, SpeakIt! for Google Chrome, or the Safari reader. To use a web-based text-to-speech tool like SpeakIt! or Safari reader, create an online document—for example, a Google Doc, containing the text.
  • Students annotate the text using the comments feature in word-processing software—for example, a Google Doc.
  • Record student discussions using software or apps such as http://eled.org/0141 or http://eled.org/0142 .
  • Work Time C: Write summaries in an online format—for example, a Google Doc.

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 8.I.A.1, 8.I.A.4, 8.I.B.6, 8.I.B.7, 8.I.B.8, 8.I.C.10, 8.I.C.12, and 8.II.A.1.  

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson continues work with theme development in Summer of the Mariposas , practice with vocabulary development, and exploration of summary writing, all of which will prepare students for the mid-unit assessment.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to connect themes with examples from the novel, as well as to apply their knowledge of summary writing to actual practice. In both Work Time B and Work Time C, select supports that reduce the cognitive load of tasks by breaking down and simplifying productive (writing) language tasks so that students can focus on the concepts of theme and summary.  
  • Chart paper of Spanish words (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Text Guide: Summer of the Mariposas (for teacher reference) (Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time A)
  • Work to Become Ethical People anchor chart (one for display; from Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time D)
  • Criteria for an Effective Literary Summary anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 1, Work Time C)
  • Summer of the Mariposas (text; one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Vocabulary log (from Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Summarize a Literary Text rubric handout (one per student; from Unit 2, Lesson 1, Work Time C)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 2 (answers for teacher reference)
  • Develop Theme: Summer of the Mariposas note-catcher (for teacher reference)  
  • Objective Summary: Summer of the Mariposas , Chapter 14 (for teacher reference)
  • Text-Dependent Questions and Summary Revisions: Summer of the Mariposas , Chapter 14 (example for teacher reference; in Unit 2 Homework Resources)
  • Equity sticks
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 2, Lesson 2 (one per student)
  • Sticky notes (one per student)
  • Synopsis: Summer of the Mariposas , Chapter 14 ▲  
  • Develop Theme: Summer of the Mariposas note-catcher (one per student)
  • Develop Theme: Summer of the Mariposas note-catcher ▲  
  • Objective Summary: Summer of the Mariposas , Chapter 14 handout (one per student)
  • Homework: Text-Dependent Questions and Summary Revisions: Summer of the Mariposas , Chapter 14 (one per student; from Homework Resources)

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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IMAGES

  1. Text-Dependent Questions Handout by Miss M's Reading Resources

    homework text dependent questions plan a plot

  2. Text Dependent Questions Task Cards for Any Book by Fishyrobb

    homework text dependent questions plan a plot

  3. Text Dependent Question Stems Grade 3-5 (SBAC) by A Creative Classroom

    homework text dependent questions plan a plot

  4. Text Dependent Analysis by Inspiring Young Minds

    homework text dependent questions plan a plot

  5. Text Dependent Questions Commonlit

    homework text dependent questions plan a plot

  6. [Solved] !! COMMON LII Text-Dependent Questions Directions: For the

    homework text dependent questions plan a plot

VIDEO

  1. Two-Sample Hypothesis Testing: Dependent Sample

  2. NSWT: Text Dependent Writing Units

  3. Sadlier Webinar- Text-Dependent Questions

  4. How to Answer a Text Dependent Question Using R A C E

  5. MagicSchool.ai

  6. Close Reading

COMMENTS

  1. Write a Narrative: Plan Plot

    Homework; A. Text-Dependent Questions. Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot, students answer selected response questions and constructed response questions about the plots in Summer of the Mariposas. B. Independent Research Reading. Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text.

  2. Homework: Text-Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot (Answers for Teacher

    Homework: Text-Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot (Answers for Teacher Reference) Document. Included in. Thumbnails. Document Outline. Attachments. Previous. Highlight all Match case. Whole words.

  3. Lesson 9

    A. Text-Dependent Questions Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot, students answer selected response questions and constructed response questions about the plots in Summer of the Mariposas. B. Independent Research Reading Students read for at least 20 minutes in their Independent Research Reading text.

  4. Write a Narrative: Plan Character and Setting

    A. Answer Text-Dependent Questions: Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Character and Setting, ... In the next lesson, students will plan the plot of their narrative including the basic five elements of a plot: introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Students will use their plan to draft their narratives in ...

  5. Depend on the Text! How to Create Text-Dependent Questions

    To create text-dependent questions, do the following: Determine how many days to devote to reading to ensure that questions progress from promoting general understanding to students forming and supporting opinions. Fisher and Frey (2012) explain that questions should progress from establishing general understanding to considering key details ...

  6. Unit-at-a-Glance Detail

    C. Practice: Plan Plot - W.8.5 (15 minutes) 3. Closing and Assessment. A. Pair-Share - SL.8.1 (5 minutes) 4. Homework. A. Text-Dependent Questions: Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot, students answer selected response questions and constructed response questions about the plots in Summer of the Mariposas.

  7. PDF Text Dependent Questions Guide

    Text dependent questions require students to explicitly provide evidence from the text in their answers to questions. When implementing this reading strategy, don't ask questions that students can answer without directly using their reading material as the resource. Text dependent questions provide a more precise means of measuring close ...

  8. PDF Critical Thinking Works

    To explore text-dependent questions, we use Kate Chopin's "Story of an Hour," which is a text suitable for the 9-10 grade band of text complexity. The process of developing text-dependent questions begins with reading the text and [Step 1] identifying the central ideas and core understandings that you want your students to develop.

  9. PDF Guide to Creating Text-Dependent Questions

    While there is no set process for generating a complete and coherent body of text-dependent questions for a text, the following process is a good guide that can serve to generate a core series of questions for close reading of any given text. Step One: Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text.

  10. How to Teach Text Dependent Analysis (TDA) The Easy Way

    Go back to the text to search for evidence. Use appropriate evidence from the text to support their claims or ideas. Make connections between textual evidence and the real world or other texts. Form original or interesting insights. If a student can answer the question without engaging in any of the above bulleted thinking tasks, the TDA prompt ...

  11. Strategies to Teach Text-Dependent Analysis (TDA)

    Student TDA Questions List: Do the same activity from above with your students. Ask them to write down as many TDA questions/prompts as they can think of in 5-10 minutes. Allow them to work in pairs or groups, then work as a class to create a student-generated class list of questions/prompts. Combine their list with your list.

  12. Lesson 8

    A. Text-Dependent Questions. Using Homework: Text Dependent Questions: Character and Setting, students answer selected response questions and constructed response questions about character profiles and settings in Summer of the Mariposas. B. Independent Research Reading. Students read for at least 20 minutes in their Independent Research ...

  13. PDF Preparing Students for Text-Dependent Analysis

    11 A Draft Rubric: Parts 1 and 2 Review helpful resources Consider the following resources and information when designing rubrics: • Criteria for quality rubrics • TDA Day 1 notes on characteristics • Notes from today's discussion on H-A-L student work samples • Connections between depth of knowledge (DOK), TDA, and Achievement Level Descriptors (ALDs)

  14. Analyze Point of View: A Long Walk to Water, Chapter 5

    RL.7.3 - Work Time B: Students analyze how setting shapes character and plot as they answer text-dependent questions. RL.7.6 - Work Time B: Students analyze how the author develops and contrasts Nya's and Salva's points of view as they answer text-dependent questions and write a QuickWrite. This releases students to work more ...

  15. Homework: Text-Dependent Questions: Plan a Plot

    Imagine Learning EL Education K-8 Curriculum Guide. Planning Hub. Login required. What's new in Imagine Learning EL Education?

  16. Text Dependent Questions For Any Story Teaching Resources

    Browse text dependent questions for any story resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources.

  17. PDF Text Dependent Questions Notes

    This allows a professional developer, administrator, teacher leader, or teacher to differentiate their learning. The Text Dependent Questions Shift Kit is designed for each section to stand alone. However, using all the items of each section provides a richer and deeper comprehension.

  18. Analyze Point of View: A Long Walk to Water, Chapter 3

    A. Determine Meaning of Unfamiliar Vocabulary: Students use context, word parts, and if necessary, a dictionary to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in chapter 3 of A Long Walk to Water. Then they record the words and their definitions in the correct section of their vocabulary log. B. Text-Dependent Questions: Students complete ...

  19. Leveled Text-Dependent Question Stems: Understanding the Plot

    Build student understanding of plot through leveled text-dependent question stems. Engage each student at their level with these dynamic questions! ... This book provides engaging lesson plans and activities to guide teachers in the instruction of Esperanza renace, the Spanish language version of the novel Esperanza Rising. Price: $11.99

  20. Analyze Development of Theme and Summarize Summer of the Mariposas

    Homework; A. Answer Text-Dependent Questions and Revise a Summary Paragraph. Using Homework: Text-Dependent Questions and Summary Revisions: Summer of the Mariposas, Chapter 15, students answer selected response questions about chapter 15 of Summer of the Mariposas and then revise their summary paragraphs to meet the criteria. B. Preread Anchor ...

  21. Lesson 16: Text-Dependent Questions

    Directions: Distribute the text-dependent questions handout using an established classroom routine. Review the question on the handout. Divide the class into pairs using an established classroom routine. Tell students, "Read over the text-dependent questions. Then, re-read Chapter 5 from If Stones Could Speak, by Marc Aronson.".

  22. Homework: Text-Dependent Questions: Character and Setting (Answers for

    Homework: Text-Dependent Questions: Character and Setting (Answers for Teacher Reference) Document; Included in; Related content. ... Imagine Learning EL Education K-8 Curriculum Guide. Login required. Planning Hub. Login required. What's new in Imagine Learning EL Education? EL Education K-2 Language Arts. EL Education 3-5 Language Arts. EL ...

  23. Analyze Development of Theme and Summarize Summer of the Mariposas

    Homework: Text-Dependent Questions and Summary Revisions: Summer of the Mariposas, Chapter 14 (one per student; from Homework Resources) Assessment . Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at ...