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Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (PhD)

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The Ph.D. program in economics at UBC owes its strength to the quality of its research faculty, extensive opportunity for student-faculty interaction, and a diverse offering of specializations for thesis work. Our faculty members specialize in a wide range of topics, including development economics, economic history, applied and theoretical econometrics, economics of inequality and gender, environmental economics, industrial organization, international finance, international trade, labour economics, macroeconomics, applied and theoretical micro, political economy, and public economics.

For specific program requirements, please refer to the departmental program website

What makes the program unique?

The Vancouver School of Economics at UBC is one of the world's best: in a recent ranking based on research publications, the department ranked in the top 20 worldwide, and number one in Canada.

Each year, we typically admit about 15 new students to our program. As a result, our program is small enough to provide extensive research supervision, yet large enough to offer expertise in a wide range of fields.

UBC offers the best program in economics in the country and has a reputation worldwide for its research and top programs.

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Quick Facts

Program enquiries, admission information & requirements, 1) check eligibility, minimum academic requirements.

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies establishes the minimum admission requirements common to all applicants, usually a minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC). The graduate program that you are applying to may have additional requirements. Please review the specific requirements for applicants with credentials from institutions in:

  • Canada or the United States
  • International countries other than the United States

Each program may set higher academic minimum requirements. Please review the program website carefully to understand the program requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as it is a competitive process.

English Language Test

Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application.

Minimum requirements for the two most common English language proficiency tests to apply to this program are listed below:

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet-based

Overall score requirement : 93

IELTS: International English Language Testing System

Overall score requirement : 6.5

Other Test Scores

Some programs require additional test scores such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Test (GMAT). The requirements for this program are:

The GRE is required by some applicants. Please check the program website.

2) Meet Deadlines

3) prepare application, transcripts.

All applicants have to submit transcripts from all past post-secondary study. Document submission requirements depend on whether your institution of study is within Canada or outside of Canada.

Letters of Reference

A minimum of three references are required for application to graduate programs at UBC. References should be requested from individuals who are prepared to provide a report on your academic ability and qualifications.

Statement of Interest

Many programs require a statement of interest , sometimes called a "statement of intent", "description of research interests" or something similar.

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their thesis supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding thesis supervisor contact for Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (PhD)

Citizenship verification.

Permanent Residents of Canada must provide a clear photocopy of both sides of the Permanent Resident card.

4) Apply Online

All applicants must complete an online application form and pay the application fee to be considered for admission to UBC.

Research Information

Research facilities.

The school houses the Centre for Labour Studies and manages the British Columbia Inter-University Research Data Centre. As a result, unique training opportunities, research funding, and access to data and computing resources are available to our Ph.D. students.

Tuition & Financial Support

Financial support.

Applicants to UBC have access to a variety of funding options, including merit-based (i.e. based on your academic performance) and need-based (i.e. based on your financial situation) opportunities.

Program Funding Packages

Virtually all of the School's research faculty hold grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and other funding agencies, implying that opportunities for research assistantships and dissertation support are ample.

From September 2024 all full-time students in UBC-Vancouver PhD programs will be provided with a funding package of at least $24,000 for each of the first four years of their PhD. The funding package may consist of any combination of internal or external awards, teaching-related work, research assistantships, and graduate academic assistantships. Please note that many graduate programs provide funding packages that are substantially greater than $24,000 per year. Please check with your prospective graduate program for specific details of the funding provided to its PhD students.

Average Funding

  • 33 students received Teaching Assistantships. Average TA funding based on 33 students was $13,467.
  • 17 students received Research Assistantships. Average RA funding based on 17 students was $13,717.
  • 19 students received Academic Assistantships. Average AA funding based on 19 students was $3,513.
  • 49 students received internal awards. Average internal award funding based on 49 students was $22,471.
  • 3 students received external awards. Average external award funding based on 3 students was $30,000.

Scholarships & awards (merit-based funding)

All applicants are encouraged to review the awards listing to identify potential opportunities to fund their graduate education. The database lists merit-based scholarships and awards and allows for filtering by various criteria, such as domestic vs. international or degree level.

Graduate Research Assistantships (GRA)

Many professors are able to provide Research Assistantships (GRA) from their research grants to support full-time graduate students studying under their supervision. The duties constitute part of the student's graduate degree requirements. A Graduate Research Assistantship is considered a form of fellowship for a period of graduate study and is therefore not covered by a collective agreement. Stipends vary widely, and are dependent on the field of study and the type of research grant from which the assistantship is being funded.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTA)

Graduate programs may have Teaching Assistantships available for registered full-time graduate students. Full teaching assistantships involve 12 hours work per week in preparation, lecturing, or laboratory instruction although many graduate programs offer partial TA appointments at less than 12 hours per week. Teaching assistantship rates are set by collective bargaining between the University and the Teaching Assistants' Union .

Graduate Academic Assistantships (GAA)

Academic Assistantships are employment opportunities to perform work that is relevant to the university or to an individual faculty member, but not to support the student’s graduate research and thesis. Wages are considered regular earnings and when paid monthly, include vacation pay.

Financial aid (need-based funding)

Canadian and US applicants may qualify for governmental loans to finance their studies. Please review eligibility and types of loans .

All students may be able to access private sector or bank loans.

Foreign government scholarships

Many foreign governments provide support to their citizens in pursuing education abroad. International applicants should check the various governmental resources in their home country, such as the Department of Education, for available scholarships.

Working while studying

The possibility to pursue work to supplement income may depend on the demands the program has on students. It should be carefully weighed if work leads to prolonged program durations or whether work placements can be meaningfully embedded into a program.

International students enrolled as full-time students with a valid study permit can work on campus for unlimited hours and work off-campus for no more than 20 hours a week.

A good starting point to explore student jobs is the UBC Work Learn program or a Co-Op placement .

Tax credits and RRSP withdrawals

Students with taxable income in Canada may be able to claim federal or provincial tax credits.

Canadian residents with RRSP accounts may be able to use the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) which allows students to withdraw amounts from their registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) to finance full-time training or education for themselves or their partner.

Please review Filing taxes in Canada on the student services website for more information.

Cost Estimator

Applicants have access to the cost estimator to develop a financial plan that takes into account various income sources and expenses.

Career Outcomes

76 students graduated between 2005 and 2013. Of these, career information was obtained for 75 alumni (based on research conducted between Feb-May 2016):

economics phd programs in canada

Sample Employers in Higher Education

Sample employers outside higher education, sample job titles outside higher education, phd career outcome survey, career options.

The market for Ph.D. economists is strong and the School actively supports the placement of our Ph.D. job market candidates. Our students have obtained positions at leading research and teaching universities around the world. A number of graduates also obtained excellent positions at government agencies, central banks, non-governmental organizations, and in the private sector.

At the Vancouver School of Economics, we are dedicated to ensuring the success of our students on the job market.

Enrolment, Duration & Other Stats

These statistics show data for the Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (PhD). Data are separated for each degree program combination. You may view data for other degree options in the respective program profile.

ENROLMENT DATA

Completion rates & times, upcoming doctoral exams, monday, 17 june 2024 - 1:30pm - 167, iona building, 6000 iona dr, tuesday, 18 june 2024 - 12:30pm - room 200, wednesday, 26 june 2024 - 9:00am, monday, 8 july 2024 - 9:00am, monday, 22 july 2024 - 9:30am.

  • Research Supervisors

This list shows faculty members with full supervisory privileges who are affiliated with this program. It is not a comprehensive list of all potential supervisors as faculty from other programs or faculty members without full supervisory privileges can request approvals to supervise graduate students in this program.

  • Anderson, Siwan (Micro-level institutions, role of gender, studies of rural governments)
  • Baylis, Patrick (Economics; Climate Changes and Impacts; Economic Planning of Energy; climate change economics; energy economics; environmental economics)
  • Beaudry, Paul (National and International macroeconomic issues, Business cycles, inflation, financial markets, the macro-economic effects of technological change and globalization, and the determinants of aggregate employment and wages)
  • Bostanci, Gorkem (Macroeconomics (including monetary and fiscal theory); Industry economics and industrial organization; Firm Dynamics; Input Allocation and Productivity; Labor Demand; intellectual property)
  • Copeland, Brian (International trade, environmental economics, interaction between globalization, the environment, and the sustainability of renewable resources)
  • Couture, Victor (Economics; Urban economics and transportation; Efficiency of urban transportation systems; Potential for e-commerce to reduce spatial inequality; Preferences for social interactions; Consequences of gentrification)
  • Devereux, Michael (Economics, Macro and Monetary Economics Economic Policy, Monetary and Fiscal Policy, Deficits, Exchange Rates, Capital Flows, Financial Crises, International, monetary)
  • Drelichman, Mauricio (Economic history, Spain, Argentina)
  • Farinha Luz, Vitor (Microeconomic Theory,)
  • Ferraz, Claudio (governance and accountability in developing countries; how politics affect public service delivery; the effects of electoral rules on political selection; the role of the state in high crime and violence environments)
  • Fortin, Nicole (Wage inequality and its links to labour market institutions and public policies, including higher education policies economic progress of women, gender equality policies, and gender issues in education)
  • Francois, Patrick (African Autocracies, Economics of Developing Countries, Indian Village Governance, Macro, development, problems in development economies, political economy and non profits)
  • Gallipoli, Giovanni (Macroeconomics (including monetary and fiscal theory); Economic Policies; Economic Phenomena on a National or International Level; Economic Phenomena on an Individual or Organizational Level; applied microeconomics; computational economics; labor economics; macroeconomics; Consumption theory and measurement)
  • Green, David (Antibiotic Resistance,  Infectious Disease, Epidemiology, Determinants of the wage and employment structure bridging between macro labour and micro labour identification issues)
  • Hnatkovska, Viktoriya (International finance, macroeconomics, development economics in India )
  • Hoffmann, Florian (Labor Economics, Macro Economics, Income Inequality, Education, Mobility )
  • Hwang, Il Myoung (empirical industrial organization and market design; evaluating different school choice mechanisms)
  • Jaccard, Torsten (Economics; international trade)
  • Juhasz, Reka (Economics; international trade; Economic History; Development and Growth; industrial policy and industrialization)
  • Kasahara, Hiroyuki (Econometrics and international trade )
  • Lahiri, Amartya (Exchange rates and monetary policy, growth and development, international economics, macroeconomics, and development economics)
  • Lemieux, Thomas (labour market issues, Applied, labour, earnings inequality in Canada and other countries I am also interested in econometric methods used to analyze the earnings distribution and regression discontinuity designs)
  • Li, Hao (Microeconomic theory, theory of contracts and organizations, and games and decisions )
  • Li, Wei (Contract theory, applied game theory, and information economics I am deeply interested in the interaction of information and incentives in various economics and political environments )
  • Lowe, Matthew (preference formation; social integration; political selection)

Doctoral Citations

Sample thesis submissions.

  • Essays on the economics of crime and violence
  • Essays in economic history and development
  • Essays in optimal monetary policy
  • Essays in labour economics
  • Algorithmic learning in games
  • Essays in development economics and economic history
  • Essays on fiscal and monetary policy during economic crises
  • Essays on gender and behavioural economics
  • Rally the vote : electoral competition with direct campaign communication
  • Essays on theory and computation in economics
  • Essays in urban and labor economics
  • Essays on urban violence and health
  • Essays in empirical Economics
  • Essays on macroeconomics
  • Essays in development economics

Related Programs

Same specialization.

  • Master of Arts in Economics (MA)

Related Disciplines

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Geography (PhD)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in History (PhD)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Interdisciplinary Studies (PhD)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science (PhD)

Further Information

Specialization.

Economics covers many fields including: macroeconomics, labour economics, international trade and finance, environmental economics, industrial organization, information and incentives, economic theory, health economics, development economics, and economic history.

UBC Calendar

Program website, faculty overview, academic unit, program identifier, classification, social media channels, supervisor search.

Departments/Programs may update graduate degree program details through the Faculty & Staff portal. To update contact details for application inquiries, please use this form .

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UBC Economics has the best graduate program in the country, and one of the best in the world. The graduate students at UBC have an astonishing track record of obtaining academic jobs in prestigious universities and research institutes.

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PhD program

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PhD in applied economics

Our PhD program offers students a strong foundation in economic theory and econometrics, as well as the opportunity to conduct original research alongside world-renowned scholars.

We provide training in the areas of public policy, labour economics, macro-economics, monetary economics, econometrics, natural resources, environmental and health economics. We believe in an ‘open-door’ atmosphere which engages and stimulates graduate students in their chosen paths of research.

Through our rigorous academic programs and applied research experience, students develop their communication and analytical skills and are prepared for a career in academia or the private sector upon graduation.

PhD students receive $104,000 over 12 on-campus terms, and have the opportunity to work as research and teaching assistants. For students wishing to advance their teaching skills, we also have a limited number of course instructor positions available.

Data access

Students can access the Southwestern Ontario Research Data Centre (SWORDC), one the few data centres that provides access to Statistics Canada data sets in master file form. SWORDC is conveniently housed in the PAS building adjacent to Economics in Hagey Hall.

***International PhD applicants:   Due to funding restrictions, we are not accepting any international applications for 2024-2025.***

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Doctoral degrees were conferred upon Zehua Pan (pictured here with Dr. Curry) and Allison Mascella this June 2022. (Photo credit: Maureen Stafford)

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The Economics PhD program prepares students for a research career. The program combines required courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics; elective courses in a variety of applied fields; and original research. The program is offered on a full-time basis.

Interested in joining our graduate program? Please review our Admissions page for admission requirements and documentation.  

PhD Placements

SFU Economics has had a  100% placement rate  for our outgoing PhD graduates. Almost 200 graduates have gone on to teach in universities all over the world; serve as advisors or officials in provincial, state, and national governments; or are employed in a variety of roles in the private sector. 

View our placement list

Program requirements

To ensure you are on track towards completion, please refer to the SFU Academic Calendar for the complete most up-to-date PhD program requirements. 

Visit the SFU Academic Calendar

Elective courses

The elective courses are graduate ECON courses different from the required PhD courses or, with permission from the Graduate Chair, graduate courses in other subjects. Students should ensure that their chosen elective courses give them adequate preparation for meeting the field examination requirement. Please see the Satisfactory Progress Guidelines for more details.

ECON 900 Research paper

ECON 900 is a required course in which all PhD candidates must register and present their own original research in progress, starting from the Fall term of the second year. To receive a passing grade in ECON 900, students must complete a research paper under the supervision of a faculty member and formally present the paper in a Brown Bag seminar . Normally the supervising faculty member is the student’s senior PhD supervisor.

Effective Fall 2024, every PhD student is guaranteed minimum funding as detailed in the  SFU Graduate Program in Economics PhD Minimum Funding Policy .

We also offer a number of graduate fellowships and awards  for which students may apply.

Program guidelines and satisfactory progress

To remain in good academic standing, PhD students are required to make  satisfactory progress  by following the  PhD Satisfactory Progress Guidelines set by the department. Students who fail to make satisfactory progress are normally required to withdraw from the program.

In addition to the departmental guidelines, the university requires that all graduate students maintain a minimum CGPA of at least 3.00. Each PhD candidate’s progress is assessed at least once a year. Students who perform unsatisfactorily are subject to the process described in  1.8.2 Review of Unsatisfactory Progress  of the Graduate General Regulations.

PhD Progress Guidelines

Comprehensive examinations

All PhD candidates must pass PhD comprehensive examinations in two of the following three options: Econometrics (ECON 984), Microeconomic theory (ECON 985) or Macroeconomic theory (ECON 986). The comprehensive exams are written in the Summer term of the first year of the program. The Microeconomic theory comprehensive exam encompasses topics and readings covered in ECON 803 and 804. The Macroeconomic theory comprehensive exam encompasses topics and readings covered in ECON 808 and 809. The Econometrics comprehensive exam encompasses topics and readings covered in ECON 837 and 838.

Note: Students admitted before Fall 2020 are required to pass the PhD comprehensive examinations in Microeconomic theory (ECON 985) and Macroeconomic theory (ECON 986).

Field examination

All students must complete a  Field Comprehensive Examination (ECON 987) . The field examination is in written form and is organized at the student's request, normally in the second year of the PhD program. The field comprehensive examination normally encompasses topics and readings from elective courses in the respective field.

NOTE: students admitted before Fall 2019 are required to complete two field examinations . However, the second field examination requirement is  waived  if a student has completed two elective courses each with grade A- or higher. Please contact the Graduate Program Assistant at [email protected] to perform the waiver, if applicable.

Students must complete an original and significant PhD thesis. Students should choose an area of research as early as possible and work with a senior supervisor specializing in the area. Please consult the  Faculty Index  for faculty fields of research.

Research standards and thesis defence 

PhD theses must meet the standards set out in the  Graduate General Regulations 1.9 - 1.11 .

An oral examination (defense) of the thesis research is required and should follow the university  best practices for the conduct of a PhD thesis defence .

Preparing and Submitting Your Thesis: Information Resources

Students are considered ‘PhD candidates’ after they have completed all degree requirements except for their thesis (ECON 990).

Department guidelines for graduate directed readings classes

  • All student requests for graduate directed readings classes are subject to approval by the Graduate Chair.
  • The Graduate Chair will consider the student's academic progress, research field and needs, and the enrollment in the regular graduate elective classes (ECON 8xx and 9xx) offered in that term.
  • Priority will be given to requests by second- or third-year PhD students who intend to embark on related research with the respective professor.
  • No more than one directed readings class would normally be counted toward satisfying the “minimum four graduate electives” PhD program requirement.
  • Directed readings requests by MA students will normally be approved only in special circumstances and after consultation with the respective faculty member.

1. The student should submit the following five (5) working days before the first day of classes of the term in which the proposed directed readings course would be taken: 

a. Completed form signed by the faculty member who will teach the course

b . Reading list 

Please send the completed form and list to the Graduate Program Assistant at [email protected] . Requests received after the deadline will not be accepted but can be re-submitted in the following term.

2 . The Graduate Chair will review all requests submitted before the deadline and approve or deny them before the start of the term, following the guidelines stated above.

   

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PhD in Economics

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McMaster’s community of scholars includes faculty, postdoctoral fellows, research assistants, and graduate students. Through this program, students will become independent, professional economists using state-of-the-art methods to analyze economic phenomena. Areas of specialization include Econometrics, Growth and Monetary, Health, International, Labour, Population, and Public Economics.

We admit 5-8 PhD students each year, which results in small classes and intensive interaction between students and faculty. PhD students may choose a co-op option (formally called Work Integrated Learning) associated with this program after passing the comprehensive exams.   

About the Program

Graduates of the PhD program in economics become professional and independent economists able to analyze economic phenomena using state-of-the-art techniques. Graduates primarily pursue one of two career tracks. One is to become an economics professor. We regularly place our graduates in academic positions, both in departments of economics and in interdisciplinary settings with a strong economics focus, such as schools of public policy. A second option is a career in the public or private sector. We place our graduates in high-quality research positions within government ministries and agencies, such as the Department of Finance and the Bank of Canada, in international organizations, and, less frequently, in the private sector.   

Faculty members of the department are affiliated with or lead a number of research facilities and centers at McMaster. These centers and facilities support economics research by graduate students.  Secure Empirical Analysis Lab (SEAL) houses a wide range of confidential micro-data that can be used to conduct research in the areas of education, charities, and public services, with data holding expanding on a continuous basis. Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (RDC) (Mike Veall, Director), houses the master files of a large variety of Statistics Canada survey data plus an increasing array of public-sector administrative microdata (e.g., census data, vital statistics, employment data, justice system data) that support economic research. Canada’s first computer-mediated experimental economics laboratory, the  McMaster Decision Science Laboratory (McDSL) (Bradley Ruffle, Director) provides the capability for conducting controlled economic experiments across a wide range of economic fields. The Faculty of Social Science is committed to developing state-of-the-art facilities for empirical research, including expanded microdata analysis and economic experiments in the L.R. Wilson Hall.  

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Requirements and Timelines

The first phase is passing the comprehensive macroeconomic and microeconomic theory exams. To accomplish this, students must complete the following coursework:    

  • two microeconomics theory courses (ECON 721** and ECON 722)   
  • two macroeconomic theory courses (ECON 723** and ECON 724)   
  • two econometrics courses (ECON 761* and ECON 762)   
  • ECON 765 (as it is a required course)   
  • elective courses must be passed prior to writing comprehensive examinations in any area (see phase 2)     

Students entering the PhD program from our MA in Economics program will already have completed the required courses and two electives; these students would require approximately six more electives. The Economics waiver exam may allow PhD students who enter the PhD program from another university to receive credit for ECON 761. Electives must be chosen so that the student satisfies the coursework requirements of his or her chosen fields for comprehensive exams (see the list below). Most electives are taken from courses offered by the economics department, but a student may also take up to two courses from other departments, with the approval of the graduate chair (economics) and the course instructor. Students in recent years, for example, have taken finance courses offered by the DeGroote School of Business , health-related courses offered by the Faculty of Health Sciences , and statistics courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics .   

After the successful completion of the first year of coursework, comprehensive exams in micro and macro theory are typically given in May or June.  

Phase 2    

The second phase involves passing comprehensive exams in two areas of specialization and writing a research paper. The field examination committee may require that candidates complete specific courses before taking these exams. Below are the typical areas of specialization and the typical courses required for each. A graduate chair may, however, permit additional specializations in areas where the department has a research strength provided they are based on courses offered by the department.   

The fields currently available are:  

  • Econometrics  
  • Experimental Economics  
  • Growth and Monetary Economics   
  • Health Economics   
  • International Economics   
  • Labour Economics   
  • Macroeconomics  
  • Microeconomics  
  • Population Economics   
  • Public Economics   

Field exams are normally written after the second year of coursework has been successfully completed. Candidates have two chances to pass each comprehensive exam. Within 18 months of starting the program, students must pass the micro and macro theory comprehensive exams. The exams must be completed within 24 months of beginning the program. Within 27 months of entering the doctoral program, the student must complete a research paper. The research paper will be presented in the Fall term during the PhD workshop discussed below. The research paper must be accepted by the supervisory committee.     

Phase 3    

The thesis is the third phase. At this point, students may choose to enroll in additional courses if they are relevant to their proposed research. With the approval of the Graduate Chair, up to four half courses may be taken outside of the department. In addition to writing a thesis and taking courses, students must achieve the Active Researcher Milestone which involves participating in the department’s research activities (for example, by attending seminars, PhD workshops and meeting with visiting speakers) and regularly presenting their research. The Active Researcher Milestone must be achieved annually until graduation.     

At this stage, students are required to complete the following seminar courses. Students who have passed all their comprehensive examinations should register for ECON 798 in the Fall term that immediately follows and present the research paper. Doctoral students typically take a total of 12-14 graduate courses at this university.     

ECON 798: Workshops in Economics I   

ECON 799: Workshops in Economics II     

Co-op Option: Students in the PhD program who have successfully completed the comprehensive examinations may apply for the co-op option associated with this degree program. The number of students who will be accepted will be small and will depend on available placements. To complete the PhD co-op option, the student must work a total of eight months in either one or two placements and successfully complete both ECON 796 Economics Co-op Work Term I and ECON 797 Economics Co-op Work Term II.   

*A student who has a particularly strong background in econometrics can elect to write the econometrics waiver exam. Students who pass the waiver exam are allowed to replace ECON 761 (term 1 of econometrics) with an elective course. These students take ECON 762 in term 2 and complete the econometrics project. Credit for ECON 761 will appear on their transcripts.  

**All students registering in ECON 721 (Micro Theory 1) or ECON 723 (Macro Theory 1) are encouraged to take the mathematics preparation course ECON 765, an intensive ten-day refresher course in mathematics (MATH CAMP). Math camp is given in August, prior to the start of regular graduate courses for the fall term. After the completion of this course, students are tested regarding their mathematics preparation. The course has two parts. Part I covers topics related to ECON 721-Micro Theory I and part II covers topics related to ECON 723-Macro Theory I and matrix algebra. Each part has its own final exam. Students registered in ECON 721(ECON 723) must write the exam related to part I (part II). A student’s score on the part I (part II) exam counts as 10% of the student’s final grade in ECON 721-Micro Theory I (ECON 723-Macro Theory I).   

***Incoming students are strongly encouraged to enroll in ECON 4T03 so they are well prepared for first term micro.  

Admissions and Applications

The application portal opens on November 15 th and closes on January 14th . 

Learn more about the graduate studies application process and how to apply .

As a minimum, a standard Canadian entrant into our PhD program will have a Master’s degree in economics from a recognized university and will have maintained B+ average in their master’s study. We emphasize that these are minimum standards; those admitted typically have stronger academic records.  

Students from foreign universities are expected to have equivalent backgrounds. Although equivalency is difficult to determine, here are some guidelines for a few countries from which we commonly receive inquiries:  

  • India: First-class standing for the Bachelor’s degree and upper-second-class standing for the Master’s degree.  
  • Bangladesh and Pakistan: First-class standing in both the bachelors and master’s degrees.  
  • China: A four-year degree with an average of at least 85%. The subject area must be ECONOMICS, not business. Strong skills in mathematics and statistics/econometrics are expected.  

A student whose native language is not English, and who has not completed an English-language degree in a predominantly English-speaking country, must submit a TOEFL or IELTS score. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for the Dept of Economics is 580 (237 on the computerized exam; 92 iBT); the minimum acceptable IELTS score is 7.5 . Please note, the minimum requirement for the Dept of Economics is higher than the School of Graduate Studies minimum of 6.5.  

If you have any questions email them to [email protected] . Please be patient all emails will be answered.  

**If your transcript states the medium of instruction was English or you submit a letter with your application from the University stating your medium of instruction was English then that will waive your ELP requirement and a test result will not be required**  

Please note if you submit a score lower than 7.5, your application will not be reviewed. It is imperative that you meet the testing requirements noted above.   

Required Document Checklist:  

  • Application Form and Fee  
  • Two letters of reference  
  • Academic transcripts  
  • Statement of interest  
  • Writing Sample (Paper or Essay – there is no minimum words and it must be single author)  
  • CV/ Resume  

As reference links are sent after your application is submitted, it is highly recommended that you apply at least one week before the January 15th deadline, as this will allow for references and other documents be received in time.  

Financial Information, Scholarship and Awards

Information on Graduate Program fees can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

Financial Aid  

Students to whom we offer admission are automatically considered for financial assistance – no special forms need be filled out. Funding is awarded on academic excellence and the availability of funds. Funding is open to all domestic and international students.  

All students admitted to the PhD program are offered two forms of financial assistance. The first is a Teaching Assistant (TA) position, which normally requires the student to perform 130 hours of marking or tutoring in each of the fall and winter terms. The second is scholarship support. In addition, many upper-year PhD students receive support in the form of a Research Assistantship (RA) in lieu of a TA, in which they work on a research project with a faculty member. The minimum annual financial assistance provided to a PhD student is $17,500 during each of first four years of doctoral study. If a student’s study extends beyond four years, financial assistance as a TA or RA may be available, but it is not guaranteed. Finally, in addition to the financial assistance provided in a letter of offer, students are eligible for TA and RA positions during the spring and summer terms, which provides support above that available during the Fall and Winter terms.  

Trudeau Scholarship: Students in the 1st or 2nd year of the doctoral program or those applying to the doctoral program are eligible. For more information regarding eligibility and the application process, please click here .  

Additional information on external scholarship support can be found at the following sites:  

  • Student Financial Aid and Scholarships  
  • SSHRC Doctoral Scholarships and Fellowships  
  • School of Graduate Studies Scholarship Information  
  • Commonwealth Scholarships  

More Questions? Check out our FAQ

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economics phd programs in canada

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McMaster’s Department of Economics has a long history of preparing PhD graduates for the competitive job market.

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Requirements

Applicants to the Ph.D program do not require a Masters degree in Economics .  

Candidates admitted to the "Ph.D 2" year must satisfy five requirements: 1) coursework; 2) the Ph.D Written Comprehensive examination; 3) the Field requirements; 4.) the third-year paper requirement; and 5) the dissertation and oral defense.

The norm is that students enter in PhD 2. There are then 6 mandatory terms of full-time residency, which usually comprise the fall and winter terms of the first three years, ie:

  • Fall year 1: full time; Winter year 1: full time; Summer year 1: continuing
  • Fall year 2: full time; Winter year 2: full time; Summer year 2: continuing
  • Fall year 3: full time; Winter year 3: full time; Summer year 3: continuing

After these mandatory years of full time status, it is possible to complete the program.  

So after your third year is complete, registration looks like this:

  • Fall year 4: additional session*;  Winter year 4: additional session;  Summer year 4: additional session
  • Fall year 5: additional session 

*additional session fees are payable every term (ie including summer), whereas you only pay fees for the fall and winter terms during the first three residency terms.  

This continues until the Summer year 6 (PhD 7) term, which is the last permitted term of registration before being in time limitation.  Additional explanation can be found  on the student accounts website  and in the program requirements section of the ecalendar.

New incoming Ph.D. students must take ECON 709 Microeconomic Theory 3, ECON 711 Microeconomic Theory 2, ECON 712 Macroeconomic Theory 1, ECON 713 Macroeconomic Theory 2, ECON 662 Econometrics 1, ECON 663 Econometrics 2 and ECON 701 PhD Comprehensive Examination.

Students entering the Ph.D 2 year will be required to take up to 12 graduate level courses over two years of study. The immediate aims of coursework at the Ph.D level are to prepare students to be able to pass their comprehensive exams, to help them find a thesis topic and to give them the necessary skills to undertake research on their thesis.

Ph.D Comprehensive Examinations

All Ph.D 2 students take their written Macroeconomic and Microeconomic Theory Comprehensive examinations at the end of the year in May. If they fail either of the two (or both), they would re-do them within a minimum of four (4) months and a maximum of six (6) months. In such circumstances the grade of HH (to be continued) will be used. In the event of a second failure, a grade of F will be reported to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies and the student will be withdrawn from the University. The comprehensive exams are denoted by ECON 701:  Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination. Students register only once for the comprehensives.  The PhD Comprehensive Exam guidelines can be found here:  https://www.mcgill.ca/economics/graduates/phd-comprehensive-exams

Field Requirements

At the start of their second year (PhD 3), Ph.D. students need to select two major fields, and one minor field. The two major fields will be selected from the set of fields offered by the economics department.  The field offerings will typically (subject to staffing) include Microeconomic Theory, Macroeconomics, Econometrics, Financial econometrics, Labour Economics, and Development Economics.  Additional fields might be offered. The courses underlying the minor field are the student’s choice but are subject to approval by the Graduate Program Director.  To complete a major field, a student will need to pass two courses in that field. In addition, a student must enrol and pass the Ph.D. Field Synthesis course for that  field. To complete the minor field, a student will need to pass two courses in that field, and at least one of them must be taught at McGill Economics. The PhD Field Synthesis Guidelines can be found here:  https://www.mcgill.ca/economics/graduates/phd-comprehensive-exams

Failure policy

A student will be required to withdraw from the University if he/she has two course failures or two comprehensive failures. A course failure is a failure to achieve the graduate passing grade of B- in (i) any course; (ii) any supplemental exam associated with a course; (iii) a re-taking of a course. Each instance is deemed to be a new failure, even if the second instance is in a supplemental associated with the same course as the initial failure. A comprehensive exam failure is a failure to achieve the passing grade in (i) the macro/micro comprehensive exam or (ii) either of the two field comprehensive exams. Each instance is deemed to be a new failure, even if a second instance is in the same exam as the initial failure. Notice that as long as the Macro/Micro comprehensive exams are taken during the same comprehensive exam period, ( i.e., either in May or during the retake) they are considered a single exam and therefore failing one or both of them will be considered as a single failure. See this webpage for course failure and comps failure webpage

Third-year paper and oral defense

Ph.D students who have completed their comprehensive exams are required to participate in ECON 770 PhD Research Seminar 1 and ECON 771 PhD Research Seminar 2 . The objective of this course is to ease the transition from consuming to producing research. The final goal is to write, submit to the department, and present a paper. Ideally, this paper should serve as a starting point for the dissertation. The dates for submission and presentation will be determined on a year-by-year basis by the faculty member in charge.

Thesis Submission

About a month before the thesis is ready for initial submission, the supervisor should consult with his/her student and identify one or more potential examiners who are qualified to examine the thesis. Check the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS) website for details regarding thesis formatting. In particular, consult the thesis preparation checklist, which can be found on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS) website .  Note however that departmental guidance on substantive content supersedes requirements set through GPS (including those set out in the checklist). In particular, note that manuscript based theses in economics do not require the separate 20 page literature reviews nor the 10 page "Comprehensive scholarly discussion of all the findings." For those elements of the checklist, please just enter "non applicable."

Joint PhD Courses in Economics -- Open to PhD students only

PhD students who have completed their first year of studies may take select courses at other Montreal universities. More information about this can be found on the Joint PhD Course offerings website .

Supervision website

The Supervision: Graduate and Postdoctoral Support website offers research and evidence-based advice to graduate students and their supervisors on how to work together effectively and avoid common problems in supervision.

Related Content

Graduate advisors.

PhD Graduate Director: Professor Markus Poschke

PhD Graduate Advisor: Professor Markus Poschke

MA Graduate Director: Professor Matthieu Chemin

Research Progress Tracking

Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS) is instituting a policy of research progress tracking for students in thesis programs. Students and their supervisors are required to complete annual progress reports. For more information, refer to the graduate and postdoctoral website

Students who do not complete the required forms, by department deadlines, are deemed by the Economics Department to not be in good standing. They can expect financial aid to be suspended, and may be subject to other sanctions imposed by the Economics Department or by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS).

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The Vancouver School of Economics at UBC offers a renowned PhD program and the strengths of a quality research faculty.

Our small cohort sizes provide extensive opportunities for student-faculty interaction, including joint research projects and active supervision, and a diverse offering of specializations for dissertation work.

Each year we typically admit about 15 new students to our program. As a result, our program is small enough to provide extensive research supervision yet large enough to offer expertise in a wide range of fields. Virtually all of the school’s research faculty hold grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and other funding agencies, which provides ample opportunities for research assistantships and dissertation support.

The school manages the British Columbia Inter-University Research Data Centre , is home to the Centre for Innovative Data in Economics Research (CIDER), and has onsite use to the FDZ-IAB Data Access Point. As a result, unique training opportunities, research funding, and access to data and computing resources are available to our PhD students.

In addition to studying with the VSE professors, our students can work with faculty in other discipline in UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems, the Sauder School of Business and Computer Science to name a few.

Program Overview

Before coursework in September, students undertake a mathematics review that is administered online in August.

During their first year, students take course sequences in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics. Each course sequence consists of two courses, each a semester-long.

At the end of the academic year, students write comprehensive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Second year

In the second year, students take advanced courses in their chosen fields of specialization and a one-semester course in applied econometric methods. Students also participate in a one-semester seminar course that introduces them to the research process.

Starting in the second year, students begin attending the many research seminars held by the school, furthering their exposure to the research frontier.

Near the end of the second semester, students submit a research paper proposal. Students spend the summer after the second year working on this paper (which is submitted in the first semester of the third year) to familiarize students with the research process and aid and foster the transition to independent study.

In their third year, students reduce their course load and concentrate on research. Students participate in a PhD research seminar course. This seminar provides an opportunity for interaction between faculty and students in their respective fields through research presentations and discussions.

By their third year, students regularly participate in VSE research seminars, usually in one or two fields of specialization. Students are also regular participants in one of the weekly lunch workshop series, where students and professors present their work-in-progress and preliminary research in an informal setting.

Throughout the year, students further their research through self-initiated interaction with faculty outside of the classroom setting.

By the year's end, students form a dissertation committee in preparation for admission to candidacy. Admission involves having their dissertation prospectus approved by the candidate's supervisor(s).

Fourth year

In consultation with their committee, students now work full-time on their dissertation. The goal is to prepare a completed dissertation chapter that students can use as a "job market paper".

Job Market Placement

The VSE is involved in preparing our PhDs "job market package," distributed to employers. The VSE will advertise the student's credentials to employers through several formal and informal channels.

Typically, students complete their job market papers by the end of the first semester of the fifth year. During this semester, students are assisted in the preparation of their "job market package", containing their research papers, curriculum vitae, and faculty reference letters.

In late November, faculty members conduct mock interviews with job market candidates to prepare for interviews at the American Economic Association meeting and the Canadian Economics Employment Exchange.

During this period, the VSE reserves its seminar schedule for its job market candidates, so students can practice their "job market seminar" and receive invaluable feedback from faculty in all fields of the VSE.

Initial job interviews are held every year in December and January. Following interviews, students visit universities and other employers and typically conclude their job search by the end of March.

Dissertation

Students typically complete their dissertation at the end of the fifth year. At this time, the candidate is given an oral examination by members of the VSE. Then the candidate defends the dissertation in an oral examination administered by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Upon successful defense, the PhD is granted.

Program Requirements

Students are required to enroll in at least 18 credits of coursework in the first year. The standard first-year course program is:

  • Term 1 (September to December) – ECON 600 Microeconomics I, ECON 602 Macroeconomics I, ECON 626 Econometrics I
  • Term 2 (January to April) – ECON 601 Microeconomics II, ECON 603 Macroeconomics II, ECON 627 Econometrics II (three credits each)
  • Comprehensive Exams in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory are written in June

In the second year, students typically take ECON 628 Topics in Applied Econometrics (three credits) plus an additional 21 credits of economics courses at the 500- and 600-level; of these 21 credits, students may take six for audit. By the end of the second year, students are to have completed 42 credits of coursework.

In the third year of the program, students must take ECON 640 Ph.D. Research Seminar (three credits).

Summer research paper

The summer paper familiarizes students with the research process and aid and fosters an independent research transition.

A written proposal for the summer research paper is due on March 15, during the PhD program's second year. Students spend the summer after completing the second-year coursework working on the paper.

A first draft of the paper is due at the start of the third year on September 1. After receiving final suggestions for revision from the faculty, a final version of the research paper is due on October 1.

Candidates for the PhD degree who hold a master's degree must be enrolled for a minimum of two academic sessions (two years) at UBC before taking the final examination for the PhD degree. For students admitted to the PhD program with a Bachelor's degree, the total minimum enrolment period is three academic sessions (three years).

Students usually are admitted to candidacy when they have completed their period of residence and required coursework, passed the comprehensive examinations, submitted the summer research paper, and, most importantly, have their dissertation prospectus approved by their research supervisor.

A student who is not admitted to candidacy within three years from the date of initial registration is required to withdraw from the program. The dean may permit an extension of this period under exceptional circumstances.

The dissertation

A candidate for the PhD degree must submit an acceptable dissertation. The dissertation represents a substantial piece of original research and constitutes a contribution to knowledge in the field of the subject chosen.

The candidate selects their dissertation topic in consultation with a dissertation committee.

Before the research has progressed too far, the candidate presents a detailed dissertation prospectus in a seminar setting; at this point, the prospectus is either formally accepted or rejected by the dissertation committee. Students research under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as chairperson of the committee.

When the dissertation is completed, the candidate is given an oral examination by faculty members of the Vancouver School of Economics and is then asked to defend the dissertation in an oral examination administered by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

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Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program overview.

A PhD in Economics gives you expertise in one of our department’s many areas of specialization. You will work with distinguished scholars who provide mentorship in fields such as applied econometrics, labour economics, monetary economics, financial economics and game theory. Students benefit from the  Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche en Économie Quantitative (CIREQ) in facilitating collaboration between Montreal's major universities in economic research, and are encouraged to register for advanced elective courses at Concordia, McGill and the Université de Montréal. Our faculty members have been published in numerous prestigious journals such as Econometrica, the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the Review of Economic Studies and the Journal of Monetary Economics.

Program details

Admission requirements, admission requirements.

  • MA in economics from a recognized university with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or equivalent.
  • Students with a high standing in a master’s degree or equivalent in other fields, such as commerce, mathematics or business administration from a recognized university may be admitted, subject to satisfactory completion of qualifying requirements, if necessary.
  • Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to the English language proficiency page for further information on requirements and exemptions.

Degree requirements

Degree requirements.

Fully-qualified candidates are required to complete a minimum of 90 credits.

Please see the Economics Courses page for course descriptions.

Economics PhD (90 credits)

Application process.

Your completed application will include:

  • Application form and fee (Please note that it is not possible for us to waive the application fee)
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Three Letters of Reference and assessment form  
  • your goals for enrolling in the program
  • what makes you a good candidate for the program
  • your expectations from your studies in the program
  • what you plan to achieve in the program and
  • your particular field(s) of interest.
  • Transcripts  for all post-secondary institutions attended
  • Proof of Canadian citizenship (if applicable)
  • Applicants whose primary language is not English, are required to submit  official language test scores , unless exempted.

Please apply  online . Read the  how-to guide  for application procedures.

IMPORTANT NOTE: applicants are not asked to find a supervisor prior to admission in the program. GRE results are optional: students are welcome to include their test results in their application, but it is not mandatory to do so.

Application deadlines

Courses typically offered include:

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Game Theory
  • Econometric Theory
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Monetary Economics
  • Growth and Development
  • Financial Economics
  • Environmental Economics
  • Labour Economics
  • Risk Management
  • Political Economics
  • Economic Design
  • Experimental Economics

Consult the Graduate Calendar for a complete list of current courses.

Teaching assistantships are typically available to each PhD student. Students who have completed their thesis proposal are also eligible to teach courses. Supervisors may offer advanced doctoral students an extra stipend in the form of a research assistantship.

The Faculty of Arts and Science supports graduate students by offering many fellowships and international tuition remissions. Entrance fellowships are paid for the first four years of study while Concordia Merit Scholarships are paid once to a number of newly admitted students. Recipients of international tuition remissions are only responsible for paying Quebec rates. Consideration for these awards is automatically part of the admissions process for all new students.

Graduate students may receive a number of departmental scholarships, including the Professor Jaleel Ahmad Scholarship and the Balvir and Ranjna Singh Memorial Graduate Award.  

For further information, please consult the  Department of Economics’ graduate funding  page and  Financial Aid & Awards Office ’s page.

Faculty research

Members of our research-active faculty are affiliated with the  Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche en Économie Quantitative (CIREQ)  and the  Center for Interuniversity Research and Analysis of Organizations (CIRANO) . They have received high honours from the Canada Research Chairs Program, and been awarded the Mongolian Government’s Science Leader Award and the prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship in Research.

Faculty research interests include:

  • economic development
  • economic dynamics
  • econometrics
  • international trade and finance
  • financial and monetary economics
  • computational economics
  • environmental and natural resources
  • game theory
  • industrial organization
  • information economics
  • market design
  • labour economics
  • experimental economics
  • public economics

Emerging ideas – student projects

Review an inspiring list of thesis topics and read about some of our exceptional students .

Doctoral students have also been published in a multitude of prestigious journals, including Economics Research International, Health Economics Review, ISRN Economics, the Journal of Primary Prevention, and the Journal of Physical Activity and Health.

Student initiatives

The EGSA aims to promote a stimulating academic and social atmosphere by organizing social events, facilitating seminars and other activities. Seminars organized by the EGSA invite faculty members and graduate students to present their research in economics, and offer you the opportunity to learn more about grant applications and scientific event planning. Doctoral students may also present their own research poster at the Economics Graduate Poster Day , an annual showcase of graduate student research in the Department.   

The CIREQ PhD Students’ Conference is an annual event held in Montreal that invites doctoral students to present their research findings. The student-run conference provides a great opportunity to practice your presentation skills, disseminate your research to a friendly audience of peers, and learn about doctoral research in your field conducted in Montreal and elsewhere in Canada.  

Your professional future

Our alumni are well suited for high-level research and management positions in academia, government, and national and international organizations. Many graduates can be found in research and teaching positions at various post-secondary institutions, including Dalhousie University, the University of Alberta and the University of Waterloo. Recent graduates are also working as deputy managing directors, capital planning functional model owners and independent consultants.

See what our graduates are doing now .

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Departmental contacts

Kelly Routly Graduate Program Assistant [email protected] H 1155.53 514-848-2424 ext. 3901

Christian Sigouin Graduate Program Director and Co-op Academic Director [email protected] Book an appointment H-1155.19 514 848-2424 ext. 3916

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Doctorate in Philosophy Economics

The Department of Economics offers a Master of arts and a PhD in Economics. The Master of arts program includes a co-op option and the PhD program is offered jointly with Carleton University.

The programs are governed by the general regulations  in effect for graduate studies of the University of Ottawa. The joint doctoral program is governed by the regulations and procedures for Joint Graduate Programs and the general regulations of the graduate faculty at each of the two universities.

Ottawa-Carleton Joint Doctoral Program in Economics

The joint doctoral program is offered by the departments of economics at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University.

The program encompasses course requirements – a core of theory and applied economics subjects – complemented by workshops to encourage the cross-fertilization of ideas in one field with those in others, comprehensive examinations and a thesis.

The PhD program offers specialization for intensive study and thesis research in:

  • Public Economics
  • Industrial Organization
  • Monetary Economics
  • International Economics
  • Economic Development
  • Economics and the Environment
  • Econometrics
  • Labour Economics

Administration

Further information about the Joint doctoral program in Economics is available from the Director of Doctoral Studies in economics at either University:

Department of Economics Faculty of Social Sciences University of Ottawa Social Sciences Building 120, University, Room 9005 Ottawa ON K1N 6N5 CANADA

Department of Economics Carleton University 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa ON K1S 5B6 CANADA

For the most accurate and up to date information on application deadlines, language tests and other admission requirements, please visit the  specific requirements  webpage.

Application Deadline

To find the application deadline, please check the “program-specific requirements” under Application Procedures and Information at the following address: Apply now .

Students who have achieved at least an average of "B+" (75%) at the MA or equivalent level are admissable to the PhD program. Six terms of full-time enrollment are required.

Note that the admission to the PhD program is based on a competitive process and that a "B+" average does not guarantee admission.

Language of Instruction

The vast majority of PhD courses are taught in English, but students may write and defend their thesis in English or French. According to university regulations, students can write their papers and exams in the official language of their choice (either English or French).

Language Requirements

Proficiency in the English language is required for entry into the doctoral program.

Applicants whose first language is neither English nor French, or who have not graduated from a French-speaking or an English-speaking university, must provide proof of proficiency in one or the other.

Fast-Track from Master's to Doctoral program

Students who achieve outstanding academic performance and demonstrate high promise for advanced research during the master's program may, with the permission of the Graduate Studies Committee, transfer into the PhD progam without completing the MA, provided they have completed ECO 6120 (ECON 5020), ECO 6122 (ECON 5021), and ECO 5185 (ECON 5027) with an average of "A" or higher. Such students must take a total of at least eleven regular courses (MA and PhD levels combined) and do not receive an MA degree. However, students who transfer but do not complete the PhD can receive an MA by fulfilling all the requirements of the MA program. Please note that the minimal admission average requirements for the doctoral program must also be met.

The request for permission to transfer must be made during the second term of enrollment of earlier. The student must enroll in the PhD in the third or, at the latest, in the fourth term.

Requirements for this program have been modified. Please consult the  2019-2020 calendars  for the previous requirements.

All courses are equivalent to three units at the University of Ottawa except workshops, which are equivalent to 1.5 units.

Students must pass the six first year core courses, ECO 7119 ,  ECO 7126 , ECO 7922 , ECO 7923 , ECO 7924 and ECO 7925  within twelve months of their initial enrolment in the program. As these core courses represent the foundation of the doctoral program, should a student not attain the required minimum grade of B for any of the PhD core first-year courses, they will be offered a supplemental exam for each of the core courses in August of their first year. Students who do not pass all of the six core first-year courses within twelve months of beginning full-time study will be withdrawn from the PhD program.

In the summer term of the first year of initial enrolment in the program, students choose a primary field and register in ECO 7001 Second Year Research Paper. Students who do not successfully complete ECO 7001 and 12 units of Economics electives within 28 months of initial enrolment will be withdrawn from the PhD program.

Successful completion of each workshop is a requirement for graduation. Students must have completed the courses ECO 7119 , ECO 7126 ,  ECO 7922 , ECO 7923 , ECO 7924 , ECO 7925 ,  the four field courses, and ECO 7001 before enrolling for the workshops.

Duration of the Program

The requirements of the program are usually fulfilled within four years. The maximum time permitted is five years from the date of initial enrollment in the program, or seven years in the case of the students transferring from the master’s to the doctorate.

Minimum Standards

The passing grade in all courses is B.

Thesis Advisory Committee

During the second year of the program, a thesis advisory committee (TAC) is formed for the candidate. The Committee’s membership will be determined by the specific interests of the candidate and committee members. It will be composed of the supervisor and 2-3 additional professors. At least one member of the thesis committee, in addition to the supervisor, must be from the Department of Economics, University of Ottawa. At least one member of the thesis committee, must be from the Department of Economics at Carleton University. The TAC is responsible for guiding the student throughout the program.

A meeting between the student and the Thesis Advisory Committee will take place at least once per year. The thesis examining board may include members who are not part of the TAC.

Research Fields & Facilities

Located in the heart of Canada’s capital, a few steps away from Parliament Hill, the University of Ottawa is among Canada’s top 10 research universities.

uOttawa focuses research strengths and efforts in four Strategic Areas of Development in Research (SADRs):

  • Canada and the World
  • Molecular and Environmental Sciences

With cutting-edge research, our graduate students, researchers and educators strongly influence national and international priorities.

Research at the Faculty of Social Sciences

The Faculty of Social Sciences represents a place of excellence in knowledge creation, research and training. Driven by both disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, research at the Faculty is rich, innovative and varied, contributing to the depth of understanding and breadth of discussions on a variety of issues nationally and internationally.  This research, whether it be fundamental, theoretical, applied or action-oriented, is generated by our renowned expertise, ultimately culminating in applications designed to influence individual communities and the betterment of society.

We have identified five research themes which collectively represent a large proportion of the research undertaken at the Faculty of Social Sciences:

  • International Studies
  • Francophonie
  • Public Policy
  • Health, Well-Being
  • Justice, Society

Facilities, Research Centres and Institutes at the Faculty of Social Sciences

Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Citizenship and Minorities (CIRCEM) , Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS) , Centre for Public Management and Policy , Centre for Research on Educational and Community Service (CRECS) , Centre on Governance (COG) , Human Rights Research and Education Centre (affiliation) , Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies and Institute for Science, Society and Policy .

For more information, refer to the list of faculty members and their research fields on Uniweb . 

IMPORTANT: Candidates and students looking for professors to supervise their thesis or research project can also consult the website of the faculty or department of their program of choice. Uniweb does not list all professors authorized to supervise research projects at the University of Ottawa.

ECO 5114 Economic Growth (3 units)

Analyses of capital accumulation and income distribution; measures of technical progress, general equilibrum theory, and labour markets; growth and institutions: the State, firms, financial markets; multisectorial growth.

Course Component: Lecture

ECO 5116 Post-Keynesian Theory of Value and Profit (3 units)

Historical perspective on the theory of the surplus. Characteristics of the post-Keynesian approach. Sraffa's contribution. Price and value theory. Theory of production and capital. Rent. Joint production. Analysis of the traverse. Applications and policy implications: intern ational trade and public finance.

ECO 5185 Econometrics I (3 units)

The classical model of multiple linear regression. Relaxation of the classical least-squares assumptions: autocorrelation, heteroscedasticity and multicollinearity. Generalized least-squares estimation. Simultaneous equation models: foundation, specification, identification, and estimation. Indirect least-squares and two-stage least squares methods of estimation. Distributed-lag models. Dummy variables. Pooling cross-section and time-series data. This course is equivalent to ECON 5027 at Carleton University.

ECO 5514 Croissance économique (3 crédits)

Analyses de la croissance et de la répartition; mesures du progrès technique, théorie de l'équilibre général, marchés du travail; croissance et institutions : l'état, les entreprises, le marché financier; croissance multisectorielle.

Volet : Cours magistral

ECO 5516 Théorie post-keynésienne : Valeur et production (3 crédits)

Historique de la théorie du surplus. Caractéristiques de la méthode post-keynésienne. La contribution de Sraffa. La théorie de la valeur et des prix. La théorie de la production et du capital. La rente. La plus-value. La production jointe. Analyses de la traverse. Applications et implications politiques : commerce international et finances publiques.

ECO 5585 Économétrie I (3 crédits)

Le modèle classique de régression linéaire multiple. Abandon des postulats classiques des moindres carrés; autocorrélation, hétéroscedasticité et multicollinéarité. Moindres carrés généralisés. Modèles à plusieurs équations : fondements, spécification et identification. Méthodes d'estimation : moindres carrés indirects et doubles moindres carrés. Modèles à retards échelonnés. Variables dichotomiques. Combinaison des coupes instantanées et des séries temporelles de données. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5027 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6106 History of Economic Thought and Methodology (3 units)

Evolution of economic thought, from the economic doctrines of antiquity to present times; critique and appraisal of scientific methods in economics. This course is equivalent to ECON 5209 at Carleton University.

ECO 6108 Economic System Design (3 units)

Deterministic dynamic optimization methods: economic and managerial applications of the maximum principle of Pontryagin and of dynamic programming. Discrete time stochastic dynamic optimization methods: Bayesian and Markovian decision theory, measures of risk-aversion and risk, portfolio theory, elements of search theory, applications of discrete time stochastic control to economics.

ECO 6110 Introduction to Applied General Equilibrium Modelling (3 units)

Computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelling: impacts of economic shocks; theoretical foundations; model specification, numerical solutions. Understanding model assumptions and interpretation of results.

ECO 6120 Macroeconomic Theory IV (3 units)

Macroeconomic theory, including topics such as economic growth, consumption, investment, real and nominal frictions in the goods, labour, and credit markets, models of short-run economic fluctuations, and monetary and fiscal policy design. This course is equivalent to ECON 5021 at Carleton University.

ECO 6122 Microeconomic Theory IV (3 units)

Microeconomic theory, including topics such as utility maximization and individual choice, decision-making under uncertainty, producer theory (technology, costs, and profit maximization), alternative market structures (competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), general equilibrium, and the economics of information. This course is equivalent to ECON 5020 at Carleton University.

ECO 6130 Public Economics: Expenditure (3 units)

The theory of public expenditures. Topics may include public goods and externalities, social insurance and redistribution, public provision of health care and education, public pension systems, and underemployment insurance. This course is equivalent to ECON 5401 at Carleton University.

ECO 6131 Public Economics: Taxation (3 units)

The study of tax systems. Concepts of equity and efficiency in taxation. The optimal design of tax structures using commodity, income, and capital taxes. Additional topics may include political economy of taxation, low-income support, environmental taxes, and tax evasion. This course is equivalent to ECON 5402 at Carleton University.

ECO 6132 Fiscal Federalism (3 units)

This course examines the economic aspects of federalism, including efficiency and redistribution, consideration of a federal system of government, intergovernmental grants, and problems of stabilization policy in a federal context.

ECO 6133 Topics in the Theory of Public Economy (3 units)

Topics may include political economy, tax incidence in general equilibrium, the theory and practice of tax reform, normative approaches to income redistribution, the theory of non-market decision-making, the non-profit sector, and social choice theory. This course is equivalent to ECON 5403 at Carleton University.

ECO 6134 Topics in Environmental and Resource Economics (3 units)

Topics may include international dimensions of environmental regulation, including treaties, competitiveness, and the effects of trade liberalization; development issues, including fiscal sustainability, Dutch disease, the resource curse, and population growth; resource topics, including optimal taxation, green national accounts, sustainability theory, and scarcity of extractive resources. This course is equivalent to ECON 5805 at Carleton University.

ECO 6135 Topics in Industrial Organization (3 units)

Topics may include vertical restraints and vertical integration, innovation and research and development, network economics, contract theory, search theory and advertizing, and industry studies. This course is equivalent to ECON 5305 at Carleton University.

ECO 6140 Industrial Organization I (3 units)

An examination of theories pertaining to industrial organization and their application by way of empirical studies. Topics include oligopoly theory, product differentiation, and strategic behaviour. This course is equivalent to ECON 5301 at Carleton University.

ECO 6142 Industrial Organization II (3 units)

Regulation and competition policy as alternative approaches for influencing industry conduct and performance and correcting market failures. Topics may include incentive regulation under asymmetric information, cost-based pricing, second-best pricing, peak-load pricing, rate-of-return regulation, price-cap regulation, access pricing, and regulatory capture. This course is equivalent to ECON 5303 at Carleton University.

ECO 6143 Economics of Natural Resources (3 units)

The concept of scarcity rents in static and dynamic settings. Basic property regimes: open access, exclusive access and common property. Policy instruments. The importance of transaction costs. General-equilibrium and political-economic aspects of property regimes. Conflict. Elements of dynamic optimization. Renewable and non-renewable resources. This course is equivalent to ECON 5803 at Carleton University.

ECO 6151 Economics of the Environment (3 units)

The environment as natural capital; environmental valuation techniques; elements of environmental income accounting; sustainable development theories and practice; institutional questions and policy issues. This course is equivalent to ECON 5804 at Carleton University.

ECO 6160 International Trade: Theory and Policy (3 units)

International trade theory and its implications for economic policy, with emphasis on topics such as determinants of trade and specialization, gains from trade and commercial policy, international factor mobility, growth, and development. This course is equivalent to ECON 5601 at Carleton University.

ECO 6161 International Monetary Theory and Policy (3 units)

International monetary theory and its implications for economic policy, with emphasis on topics such as sources of equilibrium and disequilibrium in the balance of payments, balance-of-payments adjustment under fixed versus flexible exchange rates, international capital movements, and recent issues in the international monetary system. This course is equivalent to ECON 5602 at Carleton University.

ECO 6162 Topics in International Economics (3 units)

Selected topics in international economics, including theoretical analysis, quantitative methods and policy formulation, implementation and evaluation. This course is equivalent to ECON 5603 at Carleton University.

ECO 6170 Development Economics I (3 units)

This course covers topics at the forefront of development economics, combining theoretical and empirical analysis. Possible topics include economic growth, firm behaviour, institutions, and political economy, among others. This course is equivalent to ECON 5500 at Carleton University.

ECO 6171 Development Economics II (3 units)

This course focuses on a selection of topics currently at the frontier of research in development economics. Possible topics include poverty and income distribution, labour markets, financial markets, and education, among others.This course is equivalent to ECON 5504 at Carleton University.

ECO 6172 Selected Topics in Development Economics (3 units)

This course provides an overview of selected topics of current interest in the field of development economics from both a theoretical and empirical perspective. This course is equivalent to ECON 5505 at Carleton University.

ECO 6173 Environmental Aspects of Economic Development (3 units)

Policy aspects of sustainable economic development and environmental quality in developing countries. Topics to include energy use, deforestation, drought and desertification, depletion of natural resources, debt, environment and poverty, sustainable industrial and agricultural development, conservation policies, pollution control and global environmental issues. This course is equivalent to ECON 5507 at Carleton University.

ECO 6174 Health Economics (3 units)

Review of both classic and frontier work in the field of health and health care economics. Empirical work with an emphasis on theory and methodology. This course is also relevant to students interested in broader empirical microeconomic research. This course is equivalent to ECON 5460 at Carleton University.

ECO 6175 Micro-Econometrics (3 units)

Analysis of the concepts and tools used in micro-econometrics with particular focus on empirical applicability. Topics may include discrete choice models, limited dependent variables, panel data, duration models, and program evaluation, together with relevant economic applications. This course is equivalent to ECON 5712 at Carleton University.

Prerequisite: ECO 5185 .

ECO 6176 Time-Series Econometrics (3 units)

Analysis of the concepts and tools used in time-series econometrics with particular focus on empirical applicability. Topics may include cointegration analysis, error-correction models, VAR models, volatility analysis, and non-linear time-series models, together with relevant economic applications. This course is equivalent to ECON 5713 at Carleton University.

ECO 6180 Foundations of Monetary Economics (3 units)

Microeconomic foundations of monetary theory. Alternative theories of the existence of money and the micro-foundations for understanding how money is integrated into aggregate macroeconomic models. This course is equivalent to ECON 5606 at Carleton University.

ECO 6181 Topics in Monetary Economics (3 units)

Coverage of one or more areas of current research on the frontiers of monetary economics. This course is equivalent to ECON 5607 at Carleton University.

ECO 6182 Monetary Economics and Financial Intermediation (3 units)

The evolution of the financial system and its interrelationship with the money supply process. Monetary and finance theory and empirical research applied to institutional problems in both historical and contemporary settings. Topics may include credit markets, financial instability, bubbles, and links to central bank policy. This course is equivalent to ECON 5608 at Carleton University.

ECO 6183 Exploration in Monetary Economics (3 units)

Explorations in the theory, policy and empirics of monetary economics. This course is equivalent to ECON 5609 at Carleton University.

ECO 6191 Labour Economics I (3 units)

The application of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory to the labour market. Topics include labour supply and labour demand, wage determination, human capital and the economics of education, and unemployment. This course is equivalent to ECON 5361 at Carleton University.

ECO 6192 Labour Economics II (3 units)

Personnel economics and contract theory. Topics include the economics of unions, discrimination, the economics of the household, gender and fertility, and labour mobility. This course is equivalent to ECON 5362 at Carleton University.

ECO 6193 Advanced Topics in Labour Economics (3 units)

Topics may include program evaluation, inequality, labour markets and health, labour markets and crime, and the structural estimation of labour market models. This course is equivalent to ECON 5363 at Carleton University.

ECO 6304 Selected Topics in Applied Economics (3 units)

Study of selected topics in applied economics; contents may change from year to year.

ECO 6506 Histoire de la pensée économique et de la méthodologie (3 crédits)

Évolution de la pensée économique des doctrines économiques de l'antiquité jusqu'à aujourd'hui; critique et évaluation des méthodes scientifiques en science économique. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5209 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6508 Analyse et contrôle des systèmes économiques dynamiques (3 crédits)

Méthodes déterministes d'optimisation dynamique : applications économiques et managérielles du principe du maximum de Pontryagin et de la programmation dynamique. Méthodes stochastiques d'optimisation dynamique en temps discret : théorie de la décision Bayesienne et Markovienne, mesures de l'aversion au risque et du risque, théorie des portefeuilles, éléments de théorie de fouinage, applications économiques de la théorie du contrôle stochastique en temps discret.

ECO 6510 Modélisation en équilibre général calculable (3 crédits)

La modélisation en équilibre général calculable (MEGC) : effets distributifs des chocs et politiques économiques; fondements théoriques des modèles d'équilibre général, les étapes requises pour la spécification de ces modèles et leur résolution numérique. Compréhension des hypothèses de ces modèles et interprétation des résultats.

ECO 6520 Théorie macroéconomique IV (3 crédits)

La théorie macroéconomique, incluant des thèmes tels que la croissance économique, la consommation, l'investissement, les frictions réelles et nominales dans les marchés des biens, du travail et du crédit, les modèles de fluctuations économiques à court terme, et la formulation des politiques monétaires et fiscales. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5021 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6522 Théorie microéconomique IV (3 crédits)

La théorie microéconomique, incluant des thèmes tels que la maximisation de l'utilité et les choix individuels, le processus décisionnel en présence d'incertitude, la théorie du producteur (technologie, coûts, et maximisation du profit), structures de marché (concurrence, monopole, et oligopole), équilibre général, et l'économie de l'information. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5020 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6530 Économie publique : Les dépenses (3 crédits)

La théorie des dépenses gouvernementales. Les thèmes étudiés peuvent inclure : biens publics et externalités, assurance sociale et redistribution, provision publique de santé et d'éducation, régimes publics de pensions et d'assurance-chômage. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5401 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6531 Économie publique : L'imposition (3 crédits)

L'étude des systèmes fiscaux. Les concepts d'équité et d'efficacité en fiscalité. L'imposition optimale de la consommation, des revenus et des capitaux. Les thèmes étudiés peuvent aussi inclure : l'économie politique liée à la fiscalité, le soutien aux individus à bas revenus, les taxes environnementales et l'évasion fiscale. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5402 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6532 Système fiscal du fédéralisme (3 crédits)

Ce cours examine les aspects économiques du fédéralisme incluant la fiscalité et la redistribution des revenus et considère le système fédéral de gouvernement ainsi que les subventions intergouvernementales et les problèmes de stabilisation dans un contexte fédéral.

ECO 6533 Thèmes choisis en économie publique (3 crédits)

Les thèmes étudiés peuvent inclure : l'économie politique, l'incidence fiscale en équilibre général, la théorie et la pratique de la réforme fiscale, les approches normatives à la redistribution du revenu, la théorie de la prise de décisions non-marchandes, le secteur à but non-lucratif et la théorie du choix social. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5403 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6534 Thèmes choisis en économie publique de l'environnement et des ressources (3 crédits)

Les thèmes étudiés peuvent inclure : dimensions internationales de la réglementation environnementale, incluant les traités, la compétitivité, et les effets de la libéralisation des échanges; enjeux de développement, incluant la viabilité budgétaire, le mal hollandais, la malédiction des ressources, et la croissance de la population; thèmes liés aux ressources, incluant la taxation optimale, la comptabilité nationale verte, la théorie de la durabilité, et la rareté des ressources extractives. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5805 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6535 Thèmes choisis en organisation industrielle (3 crédits)

Les thèmes étudiés peuvent inclure les restrictions verticales et l'intégration verticale, l'innovation et la recherche et développement, l'économie des réseaux, la théorie des contrats, la théorie de la recherche, la publicité, et des études sectorielles. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5304 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6540 Organisation industrielle I (3 crédits)

Un examen des théories pertinentes à l'organisation industrielle et leurs applications sous forme d'études empiriques. Les thèmes incluent la théorie de l'oligopole, la différentiation du produit, et les comportements stratégiques. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5301 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6542 Organisation industrielle II (3 crédits)

Réglementation et politique de la concurrence comme approches alternatives pour influencer la conduite et la performance de l'industrie, et corriger les failles de marché. Les sujets étudiés peuvent inclure la réglementation incitative avec information asymétrique, la tarification fondée sur les coûts, la tarification de second rang, la tarification en période de pointe, la réglementation du taux de rendement, le plafonnement des prix, les prix d'accès, et le détournement de la réglementation. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5303 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6543 Économie des ressources naturelles (3 crédits)

Le concept de rente de rareté en environnements statique et dynamique. Régimes de propriété de base : libre accès, accès exclusif et propriété commune. Instruments de politiques. L'importance des coûts de transactions. Effets des régimes de propriété en équilibre général et considérations d'économie politique. Conflit. Éléments d'optimisation dynamique. Ressources renouvelables et non renouvelables. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5803 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6551 Économie de l'environnement (3 crédits)

L'environnement comme capital naturel; techniques d'évaluation environnementale; comptabilité environnementale; théorie et pratique de développement durable; questions institutionnelles et problèmes de politique publique. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5804 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6560 Théorie et politique du commerce international (3 crédits)

La théorie du commerce international et ses implications pour la politique économique sont examinées en mettant l'accent sur des sujets tels que les déterminants du commerce et de la spécialisation interne, les gains du commerce international et de la politique commerciale, la mobilité internationale des facteurs de production, croissance et développement. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5601 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6561 Les flux financiers internationaux : Théorie et politique (3 crédits)

La théorie monétaire internationale et ses implications pour la politique économique, en mettant l'accent sur des sujets tels que les sources d'équilibre et de déséquilibre dans la balance des paiements, l'ajustement de la balance des paiements aux conditions de taux de change fixes et fluctuants, mouvements internationaux des capitaux et problèmes récents du système monétaire international. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5602 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6562 Thèmes choisis en économie internationale (3 crédits)

Thèmes choisis en économie internationale, incluant l'analyse théorique, les méthodes quantitatives et la formulation, la mise en oeuvre et l'évaluation des politiques. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5603 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6570 Économie du Développement I (3 crédits)

Ce cours couvre des sujets à la frontière de l'économie du développement, combinant l'analyse théorique et empirique. Les sujets possibles incluent la croissance économique, le comportement des entreprises, les institutions et l'économie politique, entre autres. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5500 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6571 Économie du Développement II (3 crédits)

Ce cours se concentre sur une sélection de sujets actuellement à la frontière de la recherche en économie du développement. Les sujets possibles incluent la pauvreté et la répartition des revenus, les marchés du travail, les marchés financiers et l'éducation, entre autres. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5504 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6572 Thèmes choisis en économie du développement (3 crédits)

Ce cours donne un aperçu de certains sujets d'intérêt actuel dans le domaine de l'économie du développement d'un point de vue théorique et empirique. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5505 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6573 Aspects environnementaux du développement économique (3 crédits)

Politiques du développement durable et de la qualité de l'environnement dans les pays en voie de développement. Thèmes étudiés : l'utilisation de l'énergie, la déforestation, la sécheresse et la désertification, l'épuisement des ressources naturelles, la dette, l'environnement et la pauvreté, le développement durable dans l'industrie et l'agriculture, les politiques de conservation, le contrôle de la pollution et les problèmes de l'environnement global. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5507 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6574 Économie de la santé (3 crédits)

Survol des travaux classiques et de pointe du domaine de l'économie de la santé et des soins de santé. Recherche empirique avec accent sur la théorie et la méthodologie. Le cours sera pertinent également pour les étudiants intéressés par la recherche microéconomique empirique. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5460 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6575 Microéconométrie (3 crédits)

Analyse des concepts et outils utilisés en micro-économétrie avec un accent sur l'application empirique. Les thèmes pourraient inclure les modèles de choix discrets, les variables dépendantes limitées, les données de panel, les modèles de durée et l'évaluation de programmes, ainsi que des applications économiques pertinentes. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5712 à la Carleton University.

Préalable: ECO 5585

ECO 6576 Économétrie des séries chronologiques (3 crédits)

Analyse des concepts et outils utilisés en économétrie des séries chronologiques avec accent sur l'application empirique. Les thèmes pourraient inclure l'analyse de cointégration, les modèles à correction d'erreur, les modèles VAR, l'analyse de volatilité et les modèles de séries chronologiques non-linéaires, ainsi que des applications économiques pertinentes. L'accent est mis sur l'application empirique avec de solides fondements économétriques. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5713 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6580 Fondements de l'économie monétaire (3 crédits)

Fondements microéconomiques de la théorie monétaire. Théories alternatives de l'existence de la monnaie et les fondements microéconomiques de l'intégration de la monnaie dans les modèles macroéconomiques agrégés. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5606 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6581 Thèmes choisis en économie monétaire (3 crédits)

Présentation d'un ou plusieurs domaines de recherche courante à la frontière de l'économie monétaire. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5607 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6582 Économie monétaire et intermédiaires financiers (3 crédits)

Évolution du système financier et ses interrelations avec le processus d'offre de monnaie et avec la banque centrale. Théorie monétaire et financière et recherche empirique appliquée à l'analyse des problèmes institutionnels dans un contexte à la fois historique et contemporain. Les thèmes peuvent inclure les marchés du crédit, l'instabilité financière, les bulles, et les liens avec la politique de la banque centrale. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5608 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6583 Explorations en économie monétaire (3 crédits)

Explorations des aspects théoriques, des politiques et des études empiriques de la théorie monétaire. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5609 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6591 Économie du travail I (3 crédits)

Application de la théorie microéconomique et macroéconomique au marché du travail. Les thèmes abordés incluent l'offre et la demande de travail, la détermination des salaires, le capital humain et l'économie de l'éducation, et le chômage. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5361 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6592 Économie du travail II (3 crédits)

L'économie du personnel et la théorie des contrats. Les thèmes abordés incluent l'économie des syndicats, la discrimination, l'économie des ménages, le genre et la fécondité, et la mobilité de la main-d'oeuvre. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5362 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6593 Thèmes avancés en économie du travail (3 crédits)

Les thèmes pourraient inclure l'évaluation de programmes, les inégalités, le marché du travail et la santé, le marché du travail et la criminalité, et les estimations structurelles de modèles du marché du travail. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 5363 à la Carleton University.

ECO 6704 Thèmes choisis en économie appliquée (3 crédits)

Étude de thèmes choisis en économie appliquée; contenu variable selon l'année.

ECO 6900 Thèmes choisis en théorie économique / Selected Topics in Economic Theory (3 crédits / 3 units)

Étude de thèmes choisis en théorie économique; contenu variable selon l'année. / Study of selected topics in economic theory; contents may change from year to year.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture

ECO 6900S Séminaire en théorie économique I (Geo.-Raeg.) (3 crédits / 3 units)

ECO 6901S Séminaire en théorie économique II / Selected Topics in Economic Theory II (3 crédits / 3 units)

ECO 6904 Thèmes choisis en économie appliquée / Selected Topics in Applied Economics (3 crédits / 3 units)

Étude de thèmes choisis en économie appliquée; contenu variable selon l'année. / Study of selected topics in applied economics; contents may change from year to year.

ECO 6906 Thèmes choisis en politique économique / Selected Topics in Economic Policy (3 crédits / 3 units)

Étude de thèmes choisis en politique économique; contenu variable selon l'année. / Study of selected topics in economic policy; contents may change from year to year.

ECO 6999 Mémoire / Major Paper (6 crédits / 6 units)

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ECO 7001 Travail de recherche de deuxième année / Second Year Research Paper (3 crédits / 3 units)

Ce cours facilite la transition vers la phase de recherche du programme. Les étudiants remplissent un document de recherche et le présentent officiellement dans un atelier départemental. / This course aids the transition to the research phase of the program. Students complete a research paper and formally present this paper in a departmental workshop.

ECO 7002 Atelier / Workshop (6 crédits / 6 units)

Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 6907 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to ECON 6907 at Carleton University.

ECO 7003 Atelier Thèse de doctorat I / PhD Thesis Workshop I (1.5 crédit / 1.5 unit)

ECO 7004 Atelier / Workshop (6 crédits / 6 units)

Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 6908 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to ECON 6908 at Carleton University.

ECO 7005 Atelier Thèse de doctorat II / PhD Thesis Workshop II (1.5 crédit / 1.5 unit)

ECO 7119 Mathematical Foundations for Economic Theory (3 units)

Mathematical techniques needed to understand micro- and macro-economic theory at the PhD level, and to carry out research. Real analysis. Review of static optimization. Continuous- and discrete-time dynamic optimization in deterministic and stochastic environments. Applications to economic theory are presented. This course is equivalent to ECON 6019 at Carleton University.

Prerequisites: ECO 6120 and ECO 6122

ECO 7126 Econometrics II (3 units)

Selected topics from estimating and testing the regression and simultaneous equation models. Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, statistical analysis of residuals, auto-regressive and other time-series models, multivariate regression model, and elements of asymptotic statistical theory within the context of the simultaneous equation model. This course is equivalent to ECON 6027 at Carleton University.

Prerequisite: ECO 5185

ECO 7177 Advanced Topics in Econometrics (3 units)

Coverage of one or more areas of current econometric research. This course is equivalent to ECON 6714 at Carleton University.

Prerequisite: ECO 7126 .

ECO 7526 Économétrie II (3 crédits)

Thèmes choisis concernant l'estimation et les tests de modèles de régression et d'équations simultanées : estimateur du maximum de vraisemblance, analyse statistique des résidus, modèles autorégressifs et autres modèles de séries chronologiques, modèles de régressions multivariées, théorie asymptotique dans le contexte de modèles à équations simultanées. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 6027 à la Carleton University.

Prerequisite: ECO 5585

ECO 7577 Thèmes avancés en économétrie (3 crédits)

Étude d'un ou plusieurs domaines de recherche courante en économétrie. Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 6714 à la Carleton University.

Préalable : ECO 7526

ECO 7922 Théorie économique : microéconomie / PhD Microeconomic Theory I (3 crédits / 3 units)

Théorie microéconomique au niveau gradué avancé, incluant des thèmes tels que la théorie des jeux, les externalités et les biens publics, l'équilibre général, et le bien être. / Topics include demand, production, general equilibrium, and welfare economics.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture, Tutoriel / Tutorial

Préalables: ECO 6522 et ECO 7119 / Prerequisites: ECO 6122 and ECO 7119

ECO 7923 Théorie économique : macroéconomique / PhD Macroeconomic Theory I (3 crédits / 3 units)

Théorie macroéconomique au niveau gradué avancé avec emphase sur les modèles d'équilibre général dynamiques. Présentation des concepts théoriques principaux et exploration de la structure de base sous-jacente à ces modèles. Application à l'étude des décisions de consommation des ménages, d'investissement des entreprises, et à la croissance économique. / Analysis of dynamic macroeconomic systems, with applications to economic growth. Micro-foundations of modern macroeconomics, with a focus on solving dynamic optimization problems and applied to consumption, portfolio, and investment decisions, and to micro-founded growth models.

Préalables: ECO 6520 et ECO 7119 / Prerequisites: ECO 6120 and ECO 7119

ECO 7924 Théorie microéconomique de doctorat II / PhD Microeconomic Theory II (3 crédits / 3 units)

Les sujets peuvent inclure la théorie des jeux, l'économie de l'information, les externalités et les biens publics. / Topics may include game theory, information economics, externalities and public goods.

ECO 7925 Théorie macroéconomique de doctorat II / PhD Macroeconomic Theory II (3 crédits / 3 units)

Modèles modernes d'équilibre général stochastique dynamique, tels que les modèles de cycle économique réel, les modèles de frictions du marché du travail et de frictions financières et les modèles d'agents hétérogènes. Les étudiants apprennent également des techniques de calcul pour résoudre et estimer ces modèles. / Modern dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, such as real-business-cycle models, models of labour-market and financial frictions, and heterogeneous-agent models. Students also learn computational techniques to solve and estimate these models.

ECO 7980 Lectures dirigées / Directed Readings (3 crédits / 3 units)

Ce cours est équivalent à ECON 6904 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to ECON 6904 at Carleton University.

ECO 9998 Examen général de doctorat / PhD Comprehensive Examination

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For more information about graduate studies at the University of Ottawa, please refer to your academic unit .

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University of Manitoba

University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada, R3T 2N2

Economics (PhD)

Students in the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Economics program will develop a higher degree of specialization and advanced training in research and application in economics and econometrics or economics and society.

Program details

Admission requirements.

Graduate Students sat in class listening to a presentation.

• Faculty of Arts • Faculty of Graduate Studies

• PhD in Economics

Expected duration

Program options.

• Part-time

Study with us

Our department has a strong record of teaching excellence and a commitment to an environment that facilitates student learning. 

Members of our faculty have won national teaching fellowships (including the prestigious 3M teaching fellowship) and University of Manitoba teaching excellence awards.

Our faculty members are recognized for their research in a range of contemporary issues in public policy, labour, economic development, family and gender, industrial relations and financial economics.

Visit our faculty page for more information on the diversity of our research interests. 

Economics Graduate Student Association

The Economics Graduate Student Association provides opportunities for members to connect through various events such as occupational-related field trips, seminars, conferences and more.

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The Department of Economics offers a program of study leading to a PhD in Economics. We also offer a PhD in Agricultural Economics in conjunction with the Department of Agribusiness and Agricultural Economics as part of the Economics and Econometrics stream.

Expected duration: 4 years

The PhD program consists of a combination of coursework and a thesis component.

Tuition and fees:  Tuition fees are charged for terms one and two and terms four and five. A continuing fee is paid for term three, term six and each subsequent term. (Refer to Graduate tuition and fees .)

In addition to the minimum course requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, found in the Doctor of Philosophy General Regulations , students must complete a minimum of 27 credit hours of required and elective 7000 level coursework beyond their MA program by the end of their second year in the program. Students must also complete additional stream specific requirements.

Economics and Econometrics stream

Students must complete:

  • ECON 7010 (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7650 (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7660 (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7722 (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7732 (3 credit hours)
  • 12 credit hours of elective economics courses at the 7000 level
  • A research paper, candidacy examination and thesis proposal

Economics and Society stream

  • ECON 7540 or ECON 7060 (3 credit hours)
  • 6 credit hours from the following ECON 7060; ECON 7130; ECON 7140; ECON 7170; ECON 7180; ECON 7540; ECON 7610; and ECON 7690
  • 9 credit hours of elective coursework selected in consultation with the thesis advisor
  • A candidacy examination and thesis proposal

Sample course offerings

  • ECON 7010: Econometrics I (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7060: Advanced Heterodox Theory (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7140: Topics in Development Economics (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7150: Evaluation of Public Policy and Programs (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7430: Advanced Theory of Resource Economics (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7540: Advanced History of Economic Thought (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7640: International Money and Finance (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7650: Advanced Macroeconomic Theory I (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7690: Structuralist Theories of Development (3 credit hours)
  • ECON 7742: Game Theory (3 credit hours)

For full course descriptions, please visit the  Academic Calendar .

The following are minimum requirements to be considered for entry into the program. Meeting these requirements does not guarantee acceptance into the program.

Admission decisions are based on the qualifications of the applicant as well as the ability of the Department of Economics and the University of Manitoba to serve the applicant’s intended program of study and area of specialization.

In addition to the admission requirements described here, all applicants must meet the minimum admission and English language proficiency requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies .

To be considered for admission to the PhD in Economics program, you must have a minimum of a Master’s degree (or equivalent) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent) in the last two years of full time university study (60 credit hours). You must also have completed the entrance requirements and the program requirements of an MA degree in economics or in agricultural economics equivalent to the University of Manitoba’s.

In exceptional cases, applications may be considered from students who have completed an Honours degree in economics equivalent to the University of Manitoba’s. In these cases, the applicant will be required to fulfill the PhD requirements and all coursework requirements for the MA degree course-based route.

How to apply

The PhD in Economics program has one application deadline per year, and applications are accepted for September entry only. Applications must be completed online and include several parts:

  • $100 application fee (non-refundable)
  • Unofficial copies of transcripts and degree certificates
  • Current CV/resume
  • Detail your background and goals in 500 words
  • Publication/writing sample
  • Three letters of recommendation (must be requested from within the application)
  • Proof of English language proficiency , if required

 Please read the  Faculty of Graduate Studies online application instructions  before beginning your application.

Application deadlines

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Architecture reviews applications in March.

Applications open up to 18 months prior to start term.

Applicants must submit their online application with supporting documentation and application fee by the deadline date indicated.

Start or continue your application

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for City Planning reviews applications in March.

Winter applications are accepted on a case-by-case basis.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Design and Planning reviews applications in March.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Interior Design reviews applications in March.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Landscape Architecture reviews applications in March.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Anthropology reviews applications in March/April.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . Please contact the department for admission committee review timelines.

Applications open September 1 of year prior to start term.

Applications open   up to 18 months prior  to start term.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for History reviews applications in February.

Applications are reviewed on a  rolling basis .

Applications open July 1 of year prior to start term.

Applications are reviewed on a  Committee basis . The Committee for German and Slavic Studies reviews applications in February/March.

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis .

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Management reviews applications in February / March.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Physical Therapy reviews applications in April / May.

Applications open  August 1 of the year prior to start term.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . Please contact the department for admission committee review timelines.

Program currently undergoing review, applications will not be opening at this time.

Select Preventive Dental Science in the Program drop-down on the application form.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology reviews applications in March / April.

Applications to Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology are currently closed.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Education reviews applications in February / March.

Applications to Education PhD are currently closed.

Applications are reviewed after the deadline, with decisions issued in March - April.

Currently not accepting applications to this program.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . Please contact the department for admission committee review timelines.

Applicants must submit their online application with supporting documentation and application fee by the deadline date indicated. Applications received by the March 1 deadline for a September start-date will receive first consideration for any available funding. Late applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis for any available funding, please contact the department for further information.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Human Rights reviews applications in January - March.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Law reviews applications in January - March.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Nursing (MN) reviews applications in April / May.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Nursing PhD reviews applications in February / March.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee reviews applications as per the timelines noted below each table.

Winter applications reviewed in October Summer applications reviewed in February Fall applications reviewed in June

Winter applications reviewed in June Summer applications reviewed in October Fall applications reviewed in February

Applicants must submit their online application with supporting documentation and application fee by the deadline date indicated. This includes having the support of a faculty supervisor before you apply.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Natural Resources Management reviews applications in March - June.

After the annual application deadline (see below), applications are reviewed on a committee basis by the Faculty of Social Work internal admissions committee. Once this process is complete, decisions are sent to all applicants in March / April. 

Applications open  July 1 of year prior to start term.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Social Work reviews applications in March / April.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Music reviews Fall term applications in December / January, and Winter term applications in July.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Occupational Therapy reviews applications in May / June.

Master of Occupational Therapy regular program  applications open September 15 of the year prior to deadline .

Master of Occupational Therapy accelerated program  applications open October 1  of the year prior to deadline .

The name of your confirmed supervisor is required at the time of application. To identify a prospective thesis research supervisor on your application, please  contact Immunology Faculty members .

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Community Health Sciences reviews applications in March / April.

Fall 2025 applications are currently closed.

The name of your preferred supervisor is required at time of application.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . Students selected for in-person interview will be notified in February.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Physician Assistant Studies reviews applications in April.

Offers of admission will be released to successful applicants on May 17, 2024 from the University of Manitoba Master of Physician Assistant Studies, the same day as the University of Toronto BScPA Program and McMaster University Physician Assistant Education Program. The three institutions are pleased to provide applicants their offers on the same day to help with the decision-making process.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Pharmacology and Therapeutics reviews applications one month after the application deadline.

Applications for Pathology MSc are reviewed on a  rolling basis .

Applications for Pathologist Assistant are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Pathologist Assistant reviews applications in April / May. 

The Pathologist Assistant program only admits Canadian and US students every two years. The Fall 2023 intake has been suspended. The next intake is tentatively scheduled for Fall 2025.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Statistics reviews applications in March / April.

Applications are reviewed on a  committee basis . The Admissions committee for Biological Sciences reviews applications one month after deadline.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions committee for Indigenous Studies reviews applications in February and June.

Applicants must submit their online application with supporting documentation and application fee by the deadline date indicated. For those who wish to be considered for scholarships, applications must be received by January 15 of the year in which you're seeking admission.

Applications are reviewed on a committee basis . The Admissions Committee for Applied Human Nutrition reviews applications in February.

Les demandes d’admission sont évaluées par un comité . Le comité d’admission évalu les demandes durant les mois de Mars et Avril.  

Les demandes peut être surmise jusqu’à concurrence de 18 mois avant le début de premier trimestre.

Toute demande d’admission en ligne doit être déposée, avec documents à l’appui, au plus tard aux dates indiquées.

Soumettre ou continuer votre application

Department of Economics

Our department offers a strong record of teaching excellence and a commitment to an environment that facilitates student learning. Plus, meet our faculty and staff.

Tuition and fees

Learn about tuition and fee requirements for graduate studies at UM.

Financial aid and awards

Find the variety of awards and funding options available to help you pay for school as a graduate student in economics.

Explore program requirements and detailed descriptions for required and elective courses throughout the economics program.

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Explore the Faculty of Arts

Discover the wide-ranging opportunities in humanities, social sciences and interdisciplinary studies offered by the Faculty of Arts.

  • Arts research
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Explore the Faculty of Graduate Studies

Discovery happens here. Join the graduate students and researchers who come here from every corner of the world. They are drawn to the University of Manitoba because it offers the opportunity to do transformational research.

  • Funding, awards and financial aid
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Discover more programs

With more than 140 graduate programs across multiple faculties, schools and colleges, the University of Manitoba offers more learning, teaching and research opportunities than any other post-secondary institution in the province.

  • Master’s in Economics
  • Master’s in Canadian Studies
  • Master’s in Political Studies
  • Master’s in Public Administration
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology

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Be adventurous, challenge yourself and make a difference.

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Experience a world-class education in the heart of Canada.

Why international students study with us

The University Of Manitoba Fort Garry campus.

We offer state of the art facilities with 140 years of history.

Admission and application inquiries

Faculty of Graduate Studies Room 500 UMSU University Centre 65 Chancellors Circle University of Manitoba (Fort Garry campus) Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 Canada

[email protected] Phone: 204-474-9377

Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Program inquiries

Department of Economics, Faculty of Arts 501 Fletcher Argue Building 15 Chancellor's Circle University of Manitoba (Fort Garry campus) Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V5 Canada

[email protected] Phone: 204-474-9207

Visit the Department of Economics

Meet Economics faculty and staff  

Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Main Content

Economic Analysis and Policy

What is the relationship between international trade and domestic productivity? What are the roles of urbanization and education in the skill development process? How do firms develop and maintain their market position? These are just some of the pressing issues you have the opportunity to study as a PhD student in Economic Analysis and Policy at the Rotman School.

Learn more about the strengths of the program

Strengths of the Program

The PhD Program in Economic Analysis and Policy at the Rotman School is designed to prepare students for research-oriented careers in university economics departments and management faculties as well as careers in business and government. The PhD provides in-depth knowledge of and training in general economic theory and methodology. Students benefit from a close working relationship with leading scholars throughout their studies.

Learn more about how to enrol in the program

Admission to the Program

The PhD program in Economic Analysis and Policy is looking for accomplished graduate and undergraduate students with degrees in Economics, Statistics, Mathematics / Applied Mathematics or other quantitative fields. Successful applicants demonstrate their excellence through outstanding grades, top scores on standardized test, and quantitative research skills.

Courses offered in the PhD program

PhD Courses

Learn more about the program structure and requirements

Program Structure and Requirements

The Rotman PhD in Economic Analysis and Policy is a challenging program, providing effective training for an academic career. The program includes a full year of mandatory microeconomic, macroeconomic and econometrics courses, a year of economic field courses, a research project, comprehensive examinations and a final dissertation.

Meet our faculty

The Economic Analysis and Policy faculty at the Rotman School are experts in using economic theory and quantitative methods to analyze business enterprises and the factors contributing to the diversity of organizational structures and the relationships of firms with labour, capital and product markets. The Rotman PhD is ranked in the top 10 in the world, and you will be studying from some of the top experts in this academic area.

PhD students currently studying at Rotman

Current PhD Students

Meet the students in the new Economic Analysis and Policy PhD at the Rotman School of Management. Rotman has one of the world's top ranked doctoral programs and is also in the top 10 for faculty and research.

Faculty working in Economic Analysis and Policy

Faculty by Research Focus

As a PhD student at the Rotman School of Management, you will work closely with faculty that share your research interests, are working on similar areas, or can provide a new perspective. Find out about Economic Analysis and Policy faculty in your particular area of specialization.

The Rotman School of Management is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AASCB)

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Contact Information

Graduate Coordinator Sandra Augustine Graduate Office Department of Economics Social Science Centre, Room 4076 Western University London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2 Telephone: 519 661-3505 Fax: 519 661-3666

General Inquiries: Sandra Augustine ( [email protected] )

Graduate Director David Rivers

Requirements:

  • Second Year
  • Fourth Year
  • General Progression

Permission to Enroll in Courses

  • Notes for the Guidance of Graduate Students

First Year Requirements

First year courses.

To obtain the Ph.D. degree in Economics, a student is required to take the first year Ph.D. course sequence consisting of 9601A (Microeconomics I), 9603A (Macroeconomics I), 9605A (Econometrics I) and 9607A (Mathematical Economics I) in the first term. In the second term students are required to take 9602B (Microeconomics II), 9604B (Macroeconomics II), 9606B (Econometrics II) and Economics 9691 (Research Seminar).

Comprehensive Exams

Students must also pass the comprehensive examinations (the Core Exams) in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics. Only students who obtain an average of 85 including all first year courses are allowed to continue in the Ph.D. program and take the summer Core examinations.

The comprehensive examinations are scheduled the first three Mondays in June, approximately five weeks after the regular winter exam period.

A student who fails any of the comprehensive exams on his/her first attempt will have an opportunity to write it a second time during the same summer, in August. If any student fails more than one of the comprehensive exams at the first sitting, and thus must rewrite two exams, there will be at least a week between each component at the second sitting. A student who fails all three comprehensive exams will not be allowed to rewrite. Exceptions to this rule can be made based on non-academic grounds at the discretion of the Graduate Director in consultation with the Comprehensive Exam Committees.

A student who fails in his/her second attempt at any of the Core exams will not be permitted to continue in the program.

Second Year Requirements

Second year courses.

Students are required to take Econ 9609A, one of the Advanced Theory courses (Econ 9611A, 9612B, 9613A, 9614B, 9615A, or 9616B) and at least six option or field courses. These courses are usually taken during the second year.

At the discretion of the Director of Graduate Studies, one or more graduate courses taken at other universities may be counted toward satisfying the preceding requirements provided they have not already been counted toward satisfying the requirements for another degree. To be eligible to apply for this kind of advanced standing credit, the student must be able to demonstrate that the course for which he/she has received credit has a close analogue at the 9600-level at Western. The student must also have received a grade of at least 80 in the course. The student must provide a reading list for the course as well as all materials used to assess his or her performance (i.e., copies of test questions, problem sets, research papers or projects and the like).

Second Year Paper

During the summer term at the end of their second year in the program, students must prepare a research paper (the "Summer Paper"). A short outline of its topic and contents must be approved by a faculty member who will act as the summer paper supervisor. The deadline for approval is May 31. It is the student's responsibility to get a faculty member’s agreement to serve as a summer paper supervisor, something that should be done well before the deadline. While not required, the summer paper supervisor would normally be a faculty member who the student wants to be one of his or her thesis supervisors.

After the paper is completed, it is submitted to a committee consisting of the summer paper supervisor and at least one other faculty member selected in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies. The deadline for submission is September 30. If the committee decides that the paper is not acceptable, the student will be required to revise and resubmit the paper by December 15. Students who fail to submit an acceptable revision will be removed from the program. A "Second Year" Paper Prize will be awarded to the best " Summer Paper ". The Graduate Awards Committee selects the winner based on nominations from summer paper supervisors and faculty members assigned to review the summer papers.

Third Year Requirements

Workshop papers and presentations.

During their third year in the program, students are required to receive course credit in the Communication and Professional Development Workshop I & II (9770A & 9771B).  For further information, please see “ Notes for the Guidance of Graduate Students ”.

Thesis Advisory Committee

By December 30th of the third year in the program, students are required to form a Departmental Thesis Committee consisting of three faculty members, one of which is typically the second year paper advisor. This committee will help the student settle on a specific thesis topic and provide ongoing guidance as the thesis comes together.

Fourth Year Requirements

In the fourth year in the program students are again required to receive credit in the Communication and Professional Development Workshop I & II (9880A & 9881B). For further information, please see “ Notes for the Guidance of Graduate Students ”.

Thesis Prospectus

The student is required to prepare a prospectus of what his/her thesis will consist of, highlighting especially the planned job market paper. Students are required to defend their thesis prospectus during an oral presentation to the department, which will be scheduled during the month of September. Students who are not successful in defending their thesis prospectus in September will be allowed a second chance in December. Students who fail their thesis prospectus twice will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Thesis Requirements

The final requirement a student must satisfy is the writing of a doctoral dissertation. The dissertation represents a contribution to economic knowledge, and it shows that the student is qualified to perform significant, independent economic research.

The specific requirements for an acceptable dissertation are determined by the student's Departmental Thesis Committee. The committee and the student decide when the dissertation is near its final form so that it can be defended in front of at least five faculty members of the department of Economics (including the Director of Graduate Studies or designate and the student's committee members). Students should speak to the Graduate Coordinator about administrative procedures and other arrangements.

Once the departmental defense has been completed and all recommendations for the thesis have been fulfilled, the student is required to present the dissertation in a final oral examination at the university level to two departmental examiners, one university examiner and one external examiner. The supervisor will be present at the university thesis defense.

See the School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

General Progression Requirements

Admission into the Ph.D. program from the MA program, and continuation in the Ph.D. requires an average of 85 over all courses taken while enrolled in the graduate program. Decisions on continuation in the program and financial assistance are made at the end of each academic year.

In courses where the student's grade is based (in whole or in part) on a paper to be submitted by a specified deadline, failure to submit a paper by the deadline will normally result in a grade of zero on the paper. In exceptional circumstances, a grade of "Incomplete" may be awarded. A grade of "Incomplete" must be made up within 1 term beyond the initial registration in a course. If it is not, the student will automatically be assigned a "Fail" (F).

A graduate student in the Ph.D. in Economics may take any 9600 to 9800 level half course in Economics for credit. Ph.D students may take undergraduate/graduate courses from other departments provided that both the Graduate Directors of the home department and the department offering the course approve.

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Institutes, Centres, Groups and Projects

Master of Financial Economics (MFE)

Economics (PhD)

Research in our department addresses vital issues like poverty, climate change and fluctuating housing markets. Our PhD program will provide you with sound knowledge and an expanded range of theory and tools. Learn how to apply these tools to areas of policy importance.

Common areas of research for dissertations include: 

  • Econometrics
  • Environmental and resource economics
  • Labour economics
  • Industrial organization
  • Development and growth
  • Financial economics

Quick facts

Graduates with a PhD in Economics will be able to:

  • use applied and theoretical models to answer economic and policy questions
  • become an expert in one or two chosen fields within economics
  • synthesize existing knowledge and critically assess new economic ideas
  • communicate economics concepts and research results effectively
  • complete a PhD dissertation at a level to be published in top international academic journals
  • work in universities, research institutions, government or the private sector
  • teach economics at the undergraduate or graduate level

Find a supervisor

PhD students must have a faculty member who serves as their academic supervisor. When you apply:

  • you must list a potential supervisor on your application
  • this faculty member must agree to be your supervisor and recommend your admission
  • include an email from your supervisor with your application

To find a supervisor, review the faculty contacts. When you’ve found a faculty member whose research complements your own, contact them by email.

Professor Monetary Economics, Macroeconomics, Development Economics

[email protected]

Chris Willmore

Associate Teaching Professor Engineering Economics, Economics of Health Care, Economics History, Industrial Organization, Labour Economics

[email protected]

Christopher Auld

Professor Health Economics, Microeconometrics

[email protected]

Colette Salemi

Assistant Professor Development Economics, Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

[email protected]

Daniel Rondeau

Professor Environmental and Resource Economics, Microeconomics, Experiential Methods

[email protected]

David Scoones

Associate Professor Applied Microeconomics, Microeconomic Policy, Conflict Economics

[email protected]

Professor Indigenous Economics, Applied Microeconometrics and Economic History

[email protected]

Elisabeth Gugl

Associate Professor; Associate Chair Public Economics, Family Economics, Applied Microeconomic Theory

[email protected] / [email protected]

Emma Hutchinson

Assistant Professor Environmental Economics, Law and Economics, Applied Economics

[email protected]

Felix Pretis

Associate Professor Econometrics, Climate Change, Environmental Economics

[email protected]

G. Cornelis van Kooten

Professor Climate Economics

[email protected]

Graham M. Voss

Professor Applied macroeconomics with a focus on monetary policy, fiscal policy, and exchange rates.

[email protected]

Herbert Schuetze

Associate Professor Labour Economics

[email protected]

Jason Hicks

Limited Term Faculty Regulation, Labour Economics, Public Policy

[email protected]

Justin Wiltshire

Assistant Professor Labour Economics, Urban/Regional Economics, Applied Microeconomics

[email protected]

Associate Professor Financial Market Microstructure Theory and Empirics, Applied Time Series Analysis, Macroeconomics

[email protected]

Kenneth G. Stewart

Professor Econometrics, Macroeconomics

[email protected]

Lijun Zhang

Associate Teaching Professor Pedagogical Research, Research on International Trade & Multinational Firms

[email protected]

Linda A. Welling

Associate Professor Economics of the Family, Applied Microeconomic Theory, Industrial Organization

[email protected]

Marco Cozzi

Associate Teaching Professor Macroeconomics, Empirical Microeconomics, Computational Economics

[email protected]

Martin Farnham

Associate Professor; Graduate Advisor Public Finance, Labour Economics, Urban Economics

[email protected]

Nilanjana Roy

Associate Professor Econometrics, Development Economics

[email protected]

Paola Beneras P.

Assistant Teaching Professor Applied Microeconomics

[email protected]

Pascal Courty

Professor Economics of Competition, Cultural Economics, Sports Economics

[email protected]

Paul Schure

Professor Financial Economics, Financial Intermediation Theory, Industrial Organization

[email protected]

Peter W. Kennedy

Professor Economic Theory

[email protected]

Rob Gillezeau

Assistant Professor Economic History, Labour Economics

[email protected]

Stephen E. Hume

Associate Teaching Professor Economics Writing

[email protected]

Assistant Professor Econometrics, Nonparametric Statistics, Machine Learning

[email protected]

Vasco Gabriel

Professor; Chair Econometrics, Applied Macroeconomics, Empirical Finance

[email protected]

Show me program details

Providing you accurate admission requirements, application deadlines, tuition fee estimates and scholarships depends on your situation. Tell us about yourself:

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Show program details

Your program details

Application deadlines.

September – apply by February 1

All applicants should allow additional time for tests such as the GRE or English language proficiency.

Admission requirements

Program specific requirements.

As part of your application, you must submit:

  • a statement of research interests that explains why you want to pursue a doctorate degree in economics and provides a detailed description of your research interests. You must also identify up to three faculty members from our department who share your research interests and may act as your supervisor
  • a writing sample in the form of one recent research paper
  • a current résumé
  • two reference names and their email addresses
  • post-secondary transcripts

If your undergraduate degree is from a university outside of Canada or the US, you’ll need to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) . Submit your unofficial scores with your application.

Completion requirements

View the minimum course requirements for this program.

Funding & aid

Tuition & fees.

Estimated minimum program cost*

* Based on an average program length. For a per term fee breakdown view the tuition fee estimator .

Estimated values determined by the tuition fee estimator shall not be binding to the University of Victoria.

Ready to apply?

You can start your online application to UVic by creating a new profile or using an existing one.

Apply now     How to apply

Faculties & departments

  • Faculty of Social Sciences

Related programs

  • Economics (MA)

Contact Isaac Earl at [email protected] or 250-472-4409 .

< Back to Economics overview

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PhD in Economics In Canada: Best Doctorate Degrees & Top Universities

  • Updated On December 19, 2022
  • Published In Courses 📖 , Study in Canada 🇨🇦

Candidates wanting to pursue the Doctor of Philosophy or PhD in Economics Canadian universities offer must follow a certain procedure and process in order to be accepted into the specific Canadian university or college. A successful postgraduate degree in Economics or a related discipline is required. A PhD in Economics allows you to specialise in one of the department’s various fields of study. In topics such as applied econometrics, labour economics, monetary economics, financial economics, and game theory, you will work with renowned researchers who will mentor you.

Scope of PhD Economics from Canada

Getting a phD in Economics from a Canadian university can open many opportunities for you. On successful completion of your course, you will have a variety of options, ranging from teaching to conducting research with industrial giants. With your PGWP (post-graduation work permit) you can also stay in Canada for up to three years and gain significant experience working in Canada. 

This knowledge and expertise can be utilised to seek permanent residency in Canada. Obtaining a PhD degree from Canada and working in the industry will boost your application’s PR points and increase your potential to receive permanent residentship.

Best Doctorate Degrees & Top Universities for PhD Economics Canada

McGill University, Montreal, Quebec: PhD Program in Economics

Requirements : Only MA in Economics program holders are eligible for the PhD programme at McGill University. Moreover, students who complete the McGill MA do not automatically qualify for entrance to the PhD programme; students interested in pursuing a master’s degree at McGill must submit a formal appeal to the Graduate Admissions Committee. 

PhD Comprehensive Examination are the required courses for new PhD students. Candidates accepted into the “PhD 2” year must meet four criteria: Coursework, the PhD Written Comprehensive Examination, the dissertation, and oral defence. Students having a strong academic record but no MA in Economics may be considered for admission to the “PhD 1” year. Before moving to PhD 2, they must finish the academic tasks for the MA Non-Thesis option.

Course Work : Over the course of two years, PhD 2 students will be expected to take up to 12 graduate-level courses. The immediate goals of the PhD curriculum are to prepare students to pass comprehensive exams, assist them in selecting a thesis topic, and provide them with the required abilities to conduct research for their thesis.

Fee Structure : $16,000 (Tuition Fee) + $1500 (Student Service Fee) + *$1,300 (Health Coverage) = $18,800-$19,000

Note: You may or may not opt for health coverage  

The University of British Columbia, Vancouver: Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (PhD)

Requirements : The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies sets the minimum admission requirements for all applicants, which is normally a B+ overall average (76 per cent at UBC). There may be additional criteria for the graduate programme to which you are applying.

Applicants from universities outside of Canada must submit the results of an English language competency exam as part of their application. At the time of application submission, all tests must have been taken within the previous 24 months. These include TOEFL (93) and IELTS (6.5).

Documents Needed :

Fee Structure : $168.25 (Application Fee) + $9,131.31 (Tuition Fee per year) + $17,000 (Starting Cost of Living) = $26,299.5 

The University of Waterloo, Ontario: PhD (Applied Economics) – Public Economic Policy

Requirements : 

Note: The Department of Economics program does not examine the applications of overseas applicants not meeting the minimal English language competency standards.

Fee Structure : $7,396 (Tuition Fee per term) + $704 (Incidental Fee Charge per term) + $6,000 (Starting Living Cost) = $14,100

Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec: Doctor of Philosophy in Economics

Requirements : A master’s degree in economics from a reputable university with an overall GPA of 3.50 or above is required.

Students having a high standing in a master’s degree or equivalent in another discipline from a recognised university, such as commerce, mathematics, or business administration, may be admitted, subject to the satisfactory completion of qualifying prerequisites, if necessary. Candidates who are fully qualified must finish a minimum of 90 credits.

Fee Structure : $550 per credit

A PhD Economics from Canada opens up a world of possibilities by allowing you to collaborate with world-renowned researchers and make use of the sophisticated, high-tech facilities available at Canadian universities. For further information, head on to Leap Scholar and speak to our experts.

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Frequently Asked Questions.

In canada, how long is a phd in economics.

Based on 22 graduations between 2017 and 2020, the average time to completion is 6.47 years, with a minimum time of 5.33 years and a maximum time of 7.66 years.

Is it better to look for a PhD supervisor before applying to a PhD Economics in Canada?

No, the Graduate Chair supervises all new PhD candidates for the first two years of their programme. With the help of the Graduate Chair, a student can obtain a PhD supervisor in the department after successfully completing their comprehensive exams.

Do undergraduate   grades   play a role in PhD decisions, or are just master’s grades considered?

No, undergraduate grades are not taken into account while applying for a PhD programme.

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School of Graduate Studies

Program overview.

The Department of Economics offers degree programs leading to the Master of Arts and  Doctor of Philosophy . The ultimate goal of the graduate programs in Economics is to further the student’s capacity for economic analysis through rigorous instruction in theory, econometrics, and a wide variety of fields. Graduates of the programs have obtained desirable university positions, responsible employment in the public sector, and in private industry. Because of the size and diversity of the department’s faculty, students can readily specialize in almost any area of interest in economics.

Students may also be interested in a combined degree program:

  • Law, Juris Doctor / Economics, Master of Arts or
  • Law, Juris Doctor / Economics, Doctor of Philosophy ​

The degree program, Financial Economics (MFE) , is jointly offered by the Department of Economics and the Rotman School of Management.

Quick Facts

Master of arts, program description.

The MA is a coursework-only program (i.e., has no thesis requirement) that may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. It is designed for individuals who wish to work in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors, and also for students intending to pursue a PhD in economics.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Economics' additional admission requirements stated below.

An appropriate bachelor's degree with at least a mid-B (75%) standing in the final year of the program.

Successful completion of full-year courses in calculus, intermediate microeconomics, intermediate macroeconomics, and statistics.

Admission is competitive, so accepted applicants will normally have achieved a standing considerably higher than the minimum of at least a mid-B (75%) in the final year.

All applicants who do not hold a degree from a Canadian university must submit an official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test score. Applicants who hold a degree from a Canadian university are strongly encouraged to submit an official GRE General Test score. See the departmental website for details.

Program Requirements

Successful completion of 4.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

0.5 FCE mathematics and statistics course (ECO1010H);

4.0 FCEs including the core courses in micro (ECO1200H), macro (ECO1100H), and econometrics (ECO1400H). Five 0.5 FCE elective courses are selected from current courses or may be graduate courses offered by another unit, provided they make a strong contribution to the student's economic training. At most two (1.0 FCE) of the five courses may be offered by another unit, and these courses must be approved by the Associate Chair, Graduate Studies. Units that offer courses that we may approve include Mathematics, Statistical Sciences, and the Rotman School of Management.

An MA student may be permitted to fulfil core course requirements by taking the corresponding PhD-level core courses (ECO2200H and ECO2201H for microeconomics, ECO2100H and ECO2101H for macroeconomics, or ECO2400H and ECO2401H for econometrics). To make this substitution, the student will be required to take the PhD-level ECO2010H (mathematics and statistics course), and must obtain written permission from the Associate Chair, Graduate Studies prior to starting the mathematics and statistics course in August.

Program Length

2 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W); 6 sessions part-time

3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Economics offers two PhD programs: a regular-entry program for students who have completed a master’s degree in economics or a closely related field, and a direct-entry program for students with only an undergraduate degree. Both are full-time programs.

PhD Program

Minimum B+ standing in an MA program in economics. Admission is competitive, so accepted applicants will normally have achieved a standing considerably higher than the minimum B+.

A strong preparation in advanced mathematics, statistics, and economics, including successful completion of MA-level microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, and econometrics.

Students must maintain a minimum average of B+ throughout their coursework and successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

Year 1: 3.0 FCEs, normally consisting of two half courses in each area:

Microeconomics (ECO2200H and ECO2201H)

Macroeconomics (ECO2100H and ECO2101H)

Econometrics (ECO2400H and ECO2401H)

Year 2: at least two half courses (1.0 FCE), including the required courses for a major field of specialization and a minor field of specialization.

Students must write an original paper in Year 2 and present it in the relevant workshop in the Fall session of Year 3.

Students must also take ECO4060Y 0 Graduate Research Seminar (1.0 FCE) in Year 2 and complete it by the end of Year 3.

Suitable PhD-level courses taken by a student in the MA program in the Department of Economics may, with the permission of the Associate Chair, Graduate Studies, fulfil a portion of the major and minor field requirements of the PhD program.

A thesis based on original research.

General examinations

Successful completion of theory comprehensive examinations. Students are required to take two comprehensive examinations in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory after the end of the Winter session (usually June) in Year 1 of their program. Performance on these exams is evaluated on a distinction/pass/fail basis. If a theory comprehensive examination is failed on the first attempt, it must be re-taken later in the Summer (usually in August) of the same year.

If a student does not obtain a minimum grade of A in every course required for their major field of specialization, or took some of the required courses during their MA in Economics program at the University of Toronto, the student is required to take a field comprehensive examination in their major field of specialization after the end of the Winter session in Year 2 (usually June). If the exam is failed, it must be re-taken later in the Summer (usually in August) of the same year. The major fields of specialization offered regularly are:

Behavioural Economics

Econometrics

Economic Development

Financial Economics

Industrial Organization

International Economics

Labour Economics

Macroeconomics

Microeconomic Theory

Public Economics.

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum A– standing in the last two years of study in a bachelor’s program in economics or a related field, such as finance, statistics, or mathematics. Because admission is competitive, accepted applicants will normally have achieved a standing considerably higher than the minimum A–.

A strong preparation in advanced mathematics, statistics, and economics.

Students must maintain a minimum average of B+ throughout their coursework and successfully complete a total of 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

Year 1: normally two half courses in each area (3.0 FCEs), as follows:

Year 2: six half courses (3.0 FCEs), including the required courses for a major field of specialization and a minor field of specialization.

General examinations.

Successful completion of theory comprehensive examinations . Students must take two comprehensive examinations in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory after the end of the Winter session (usually June) in Year 1 of their program. Performance on these exams is evaluated on a distinction/pass/fail basis. If a theory comprehensive examination is failed on the first attempt, it must be re-taken later in the Summer (usually in August) of the same year.

If a student does not obtain a minimum grade of A in every course required for their major field of specialization, the student must take a field comprehensive examination in their major field of specialization after the end of the Winter session in Year 2 (usually June). If the exam is failed, it must be re-taken later in the Summer (usually in August) of the same year. The major fields of specialization offered regularly are:

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

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MA and PhD programs

Associate chair, graduate studies, ma director, placement officers, graduate administrator, graduate assistant.

For questions about the MA and PhD programs (including questions about admission requirements and the online application), please see our contact page .

For questions about the Master of Financial Economics (MFE) program, please write to [email protected] .

PhD job candidates PhD student placement MA student placement

Department of Economics University of Toronto Max Gluskin House 150 St. George Street Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G7, Canada (416) 978-4622

  • University of Toronto
  • Faculty of Arts & Science
  • UTM Economics

International Economics and Finance (MA), Economics (PhD)

Part of the  Faculty of Arts

Economics graduate students studying in classroom

Program Overview

Format : Full-time, part-time (MA); Full-time (PhD)

Degree Earned : Master of Arts or PhD

Designed with input from renowned Canadian economists and business leaders, this program features extensive opportunities for one-on-one interaction with professors, program co-ordinators and fellow students. Combining rigorous analytical training with an empirical orientation, the MA program produces graduates who excel as researchers and managers at national and international organizations. PhD graduates become highly qualified economists with the analytical and empirical expertise required to succeed in the global economy.

Diana Yang, PhD candidate

At a Glance

Admissions information.

  • Completion of a four-year undergraduate (or equivalent) degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum GPA or equivalent of 3.00/4.33 (B)
  • Statement of interest
  • Transcripts
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • English language proficiency requirement
  • Completion of a master’s degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum grade point average (GPA) or equivalent of 3.33/4.33 (B+)

More information on  admission requirements . Due to the competitive nature of our programs, it is not possible to offer admission to everyone who applies that meets the minimum entrance requirements for the program. 

Program-specific requirements for MA and PhD .

Check Application Deadline

Students are encouraged to submit applications prior to the first consideration date to increase their chances of securing financial support for their graduate studies. Applications received after the first consideration date will be accepted and reviewed based on spaces remaining in the program.

See application dates .

Financing Your Studies

For detailed graduate tuition and fees information please visit  Fees by Program .

For information on scholarships, awards and financing your graduate studies visit  Financing Your Studies.

Research Areas

  • Applied Econometrics
  • Applied Theory
  • Asset Pricing
  • Decision Theory
  • Econometrics
  • Economic Development
  • Economic Growth
  • Economic History
  • Economics Inequality
  • Empirical Finance
  • Environmental Economics
  • Financial Econometrics
  • Game Theory
  • Housing and Land
  • Industrial Organization
  • International Finance
  • International Institutions
  • International Migration
  • International Monetary Economics
  • International Trade
  • Labour Economics
  • Macro-Monetary Economics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Mathematical Economics
  • Microeconomics
  • Monetary Economics
  • Public Finance
  • Theoretical Econometrics

Sample Courses

Economics (MA, PhD) graduate program calendar

  • Economics Help Centre
  • Yearly membership with TABE

Graduate Admissions

Admissions information and how to apply

Graduate Studies Admissions Office 11th Floor, 1 Dundas Street West Toronto, ON Telephone: 416-979-5150 Email:  [email protected] For information specific to programs, please see the program contact information below.

Program Contacts

Dr. Germán Pupato Graduate Program Director Telephone: 416-979-5000 ext. 553143 Email: [email protected]

Karen Fajardo Graduate Program Administrator Telephone: 416-979-5000 ext. 557856 Email:  [email protected] / [email protected]

“The [TMU] Economics PhD program was one of the most valuable experiences of my life. The education I received provided me with a sound foundation to continue learning throughout my career. The faculty members in the Department truly care about their students professionally and personally. I am proud to be a graduate." Chuyi Fang, PhD alumna, currently an assistant professor at Shanghai University

Student Profile: My Voice, Our Future Honourable Mention  (external link) 

Angélique Bernabé (economics PhD student and founding member of GRADShowcase ) uses her graduate education to help homeless youth in Toronto.

economics phd programs in canada

Find curriculum, course descriptions and important dates for Economics (MA, PhD).

economics phd programs in canada

Once you’ve made an informed choice about which program(s) you are going to apply to, preparing your application requires careful research and planning.

At Toronto Metropolitan University, we understand that pursuing graduate studies is a significant financial investment. Funding comes from a combination of employment contracts (as a teaching assistant), scholarships, awards and stipends. There are a number of additional funding sources – internal and external – available to graduate students that can increase these funding levels.

As an urban innovation university, Toronto Metropolitan University offers 60+ cutting-edge, career-oriented graduate programs, as well as 125+ research centres, institutes and labs, in a wide range of disciplines. Our close connections with industry, government and community partners provide opportunities to apply your knowledge to real-world challenges and make a difference.

Best Global Universities for Economics and Business in Canada

These are the top universities in Canada for economics and business, based on their reputation and research in the field. Read the methodology »

To unlock more data and access tools to help you get into your dream school, sign up for the  U.S. News College Compass !

Here are the best global universities for economics and business in Canada

University of toronto, university of british columbia, universite de montreal, western university (university of western ontario), university of alberta, york university - canada, mcgill university, simon fraser university, university of waterloo, university of calgary.

See the full rankings

  • Clear Filters

economics phd programs in canada

  • # 32 in Best Universities for Economics and Business
  • # 18 in Best Global Universities

The University of Toronto is a public institution that was founded in 1827. Around 80 percent of its students study at... Read More

economics phd programs in canada

  • # 68 in Best Universities for Economics and Business
  • # 35 in Best Global Universities

The University of British Columbia is a public institution located in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The... Read More

economics phd programs in canada

  • # 94 in Best Universities for Economics and Business
  • # 156 in Best Global Universities  (tie)

The University of Montreal is a public institution that traces its roots back to 1878. Initially a branch of the... Read More

  • # 98 in Best Universities for Economics and Business  (tie)
  • # 300 in Best Global Universities  (tie)

economics phd programs in canada

  • # 102 in Best Universities for Economics and Business  (tie)
  • # 136 in Best Global Universities  (tie)

The University of Alberta is a public institution that was founded in 1908. Located in the province of Alberta in... Read More

  • # 113 in Best Universities for Economics and Business  (tie)
  • # 426 in Best Global Universities  (tie)

economics phd programs in canada

  • # 147 in Best Universities for Economics and Business
  • # 54 in Best Global Universities

McGill University is a public institution that was founded in 1821 and is located in Quebec, Canada. The university has... Read More

  • # 170 in Best Universities for Economics and Business
  • # 317 in Best Global Universities  (tie)
  • # 194 in Best Universities for Economics and Business  (tie)
  • # 191 in Best Global Universities

The University of Waterloo is a public institution that was founded in 1957. The Canadian university's main campus is in... Read More

  • # 205 in Best Universities for Economics and Business  (tie)
  • # 175 in Best Global Universities  (tie)

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Thinking of Pursuing a PhD in Economics? Info on Graduate School and Beyond

Kasey Chatterji-Len and Anna Kovner

Photo of three young students writing a formula on a green blackboard with white chalk.

Becoming a PhD economist can provide a fulfilling and financially secure career path. However, getting started in the field can be daunting if you don’t know much about the preparation you’ll need and the available job opportunities. If you’re wondering what it means to be an economics researcher or how to become one, please read on. We’ll review how to prepare for a career in economics research, what an economics PhD program entails, and what types of opportunities it might bring. Economic education is a core component of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s mission to serve the community. To empower would-be economists, this post provides information for students who seek a career in economics research. We hope this information will be helpful to students interested in economics, regardless of their background and economic situation.  This information is most applicable to students applying to programs in the United States.  

The Breadth of Economics Research  

Academic disciplines conduct research in different ways, so it’s important to have a basic understanding of the types of questions economists ask and how they approach answering them. There are many definitions of economics, but a broadly useful one is the study of how people, organizations, and governments make decisions under different constraints, and how those decisions may affect their outcomes. 

When answering these questions, economists seek to ground their analyses in models and to be quantitatively precise about the effects they assign to any given cause. The range of topics economists can study is wide, but the accepted approaches to answering questions are stricter. Some examples of what economists might ask: 

  • How do different public housing programs affect the children who live there? 
  • Does a certain type of law encourage businesses to innovate? 
  • How will a change in the interest rate affect inflation and unemployment rates? 
  • How much does affordable health insurance improve people’s health? 
  • How can poor countries eradicate poverty? 

There are many different subfields within economics, including, but not limited to behavioral, econometrics, energy/environmental, development, financial, international, monetary, public, and urban economics. You can familiarize yourself with the latest work in economics by subscribing to working paper series, such as NBER’s New This Week or the New York Fed’s Staff Reports . To get an idea of the breadth of questions economists can answer, you could listen to Stephen Dubner’s “ Freakonomics Radio ” podcast. You may also want to explore the Journal of Economic Perspectives , the New York Fed’s Liberty Street Economics blog, VoxDev , or VoxEU .  

What Is a PhD Program Like?    

Economics PhD programs typically last five to seven years. Unlike masters programs, they are often fully funded with a stipend, though most require students to complete teaching assistant and/or research assistant (RA) work as part of their funding package. In the first two years, students take classes, many of which are mathematically demanding. The rest of the program can include additional classes but is primarily devoted to original research with the aim of producing publishable papers that will constitute the dissertation.  

Faculty advisors are a central part of PhD programs, as students look to them for guidance during the research process. Economics PhD programs are offered within university economics departments, but there are similar programs in public policy and business schools. You can look at their websites to understand any differences in coursework and subsequent job placements. 

What Can You Do with an Economics PhD?  

Upon graduation, students can obtain jobs in a variety of industries. Many PhD students hope to become university professors. Governments and public policy-related institutions such as the Federal Reserve System, the U.S. federal government, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) also hire economists to work on policy, lead programs, and conduct research. Finally, economics PhD graduates can also find employment at a variety of private sector companies, including banks, economic consulting firms, and big tech companies. The pay for these different positions can vary. According to the American Economics Association (AEA), the average starting salary for economics assistant professors in 2022-23 was approximately $140,000 at PhD granting institutions and $98,000 at BA granting institutions. 

Programs often publish the placements of their PhD graduates, so you can look online to see specific employment outcomes. See, for example, the University of Maryland’s placements . Ultimately, economists are highly regarded as authorities on a variety of topics. Governments, nonprofits, philanthropic foundations, financial institutions, and non-financial businesses all look to economists to answer important questions about how to best achieve their goals. Thus, earning an economics Ph.D. can potentially help you to influence issues that are important to you. 

Preparing for an Economics PhD Program  

There are several components to an economics PhD program application: college transcripts, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and personal statements. Please download the Appendix linked below to learn more about transcripts and letters of recommendation. The Appendix details ways in which you can select coursework, obtain research experience, and develop relationships to position yourself for success as a PhD applicant.  

If you feel that you are too far along in your academic career to take enough of the classes described in the Appendix, this does not necessarily preclude you from pursuing an economics PhD. For example, it’s possible to take some of these classes through a master’s program, or through a pre-doctoral RA job. Some pre-doctoral RA jobs, such as the one here at the New York Fed , may enable you to take classes in preparation for graduate school. If you are concerned about your transcript, reach out to an economist at your university for advice; program standards for coursework and grades vary, and it’s a good idea to get more personalized advice. 

Research Experience   

If you’re interested in becoming an economics researcher and applying to PhD programs, it’s best to get research experience as soon as possible. Working as an RA is a great way to learn how to conduct research and get a better idea of whether it’s the right career path for you. Additionally, it can help you obtain a letter of recommendation for graduate school applications and improve your qualifications.  

All types of academic research can be enriching, but it’s beneficial to gain experience working directly with an economist. To find a position, you can reach out to professors whose work you find interesting or find an RA program at your school. Typical RA tasks may involve data collection and cleaning, as well as running analyses and creating charts to represent results. This is where coding skills become crucial; having taken math, statistics, and econometrics courses will also enable you to take on more responsibilities. 

You may also have the opportunity to conduct your own research, possibly under the supervision of a professor at your university. This research could be self-initiated or part of a course such as a thesis workshop. Self-directed research is a great opportunity to learn about all stages of the research process. It’s also an excellent opportunity to create a writing sample for graduate school applications. Ultimately, though, your motivation for conducting your own research project should be that you want to answer a question.  One thing economists have in common is a love of answering questions using data and theory. 

Research experience is also often obtained after completing an undergraduate or master’s degree. Taking on a full-time RA position before applying to PhD programs is very common and can make you a more competitive applicant. You may either get an RA job working for a professor or participate in a pre-doctoral RA program.  

Research assistant programs are more structured than positions with individual professors or projects, which could be helpful. Universities, parts of the government, think tanks, research organizations, and the Federal Reserve System are all good places to look for research assistant programs. To help you decide which opportunities are most desirable, you may want to ask potential employers : Where do people in this program tend to go afterward? Will I be working directly with an economist? How much of my time will be spent on academic research work? Will I be able to take classes as part of this program? Considering whether an economist will be able to evaluate your performance is an important factor for recommendation letters. The ability to take classes, either through tuition reimbursement or waivers, can also be an important benefit. 

The Research Analyst program here at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York is one example of these programs and you should check it out here . The Federal Reserve Board of Governors also has a large program, and many other regional Federal Reserve Banks have similar programs. In addition, the PREDOC website and the  NBER post listings of RA opportunities. J-PAL and IPA also tend to recruit RAs for economic development projects. Another source of RA opportunities is the @econ_ra account on X. 

Who Should Get a PhD in Economics?  

A PhD may not be for everyone, but it is for anyone—people of all genders, religions, ethnicities, races, and national origins have PhDs in economics. Many economists majored in economics, but others majored in math, physics, or chemistry. Because economics is such an integral part of policymaking, it is important that economists come from a wide range of backgrounds so policy can be stronger and more effective. The inclusion of differing perspectives helps ensure that the contribution of economists to work in public policy, academia, and beyond effectively serves the broadest range of society. 

  • Coursework Appendix

economics phd programs in canada

Kasey Chatterji-Len is a research analyst in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Research and Statistics Group.

economics phd programs in canada

Anna Kovner  is the director of Financial Stability Policy Research in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group.

How to cite this post: Kasey Chatterji-Len and Anna Kovner, “Thinking of Pursuing a PhD in Economics? Info on Graduate School and Beyond,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics , May 31, 2024, https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2024/05/thinking-of-pursuing-a-phd-in-economics-info-on-graduate-school-and-beyond/.

You may also be interested in: AEA: Resources for Students

PREDOC: Guidance for Undergraduates

RA Positions-Not at the NBER

Disclaimer The views expressed in this post are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the author(s).

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Education Rankings by Country 2024

There is a correlation between a country's educational system quality and its economic status, with developed nations offering higher quality education.

The U.S., despite ranking high in educational system surveys, falls behind in math and science scores compared to many other countries.

Educational system adequacy varies globally, with some countries struggling due to internal conflicts, economic challenges, or underfunded programs.

While education levels vary from country to country, there is a clear correlation between the quality of a country's educational system and its general economic status and overall well-being. In general, developing nations tend to offer their citizens a higher quality of education than the least developed nations do, and fully developed nations offer the best quality of education of all. Education is clearly a vital contributor to any country's overall health.

According to the Global Partnership for Education , education is considered to be a human right and plays a crucial role in human, social, and economic development . Education promotes gender equality, fosters peace, and increases a person's chances of having more and better life and career opportunities.

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." — Nelson Mandela

The annual Best Countries Report , conducted by US News and World Report, BAV Group, and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania , reserves an entire section for education. The report surveys thousands of people across 78 countries, then ranks those countries based upon the survey's responses. The education portion of the survey compiles scores from three equally-weighted attributes: a well-developed public education system, would consider attending university there, and provides top-quality education. As of 2023, the top ten countries based on education rankings are:

Countries with the Best Educational Systems - 2021 Best Countries Report*

Ironically, despite the United States having the best-surveyed education system on the globe, U.S students consistently score lower in math and science than students from many other countries. According to a Business Insider report in 2018, the U.S. ranked 38th in math scores and 24th in science. Discussions about why the United States' education rankings have fallen by international standards over the past three decades frequently point out that government spending on education has failed to keep up with inflation.

It's also worthwhile to note that while the Best Countries study is certainly respectable, other studies use different methodologies or emphasize different criteria, which often leads to different results. For example, the Global Citizens for Human Rights' annual study measures ten levels of education from early childhood enrollment rates to adult literacy. Its final 2020 rankings look a bit different:

Education Rates of Children Around the World

Most findings and ranking regarding education worldwide involve adult literacy rates and levels of education completed. However, some studies look at current students and their abilities in different subjects.

One of the most-reviewed studies regarding education around the world involved 470,000 fifteen-year-old students. Each student was administered tests in math, science, and reading similar to the SAT or ACT exams (standardized tests used for college admissions in the U.S.) These exam scores were later compiled to determine each country's average score for each of the three subjects. Based on this study, China received the highest scores , followed by Korea, Finland , Hong Kong , Singapore , Canada , New Zealand , Japan , Australia and the Netherlands .

On the down side, there are many nations whose educational systems are considered inadequate. This could be due to internal conflict, economic problems, or underfunded programs. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's Education for All Global Monitoring Report ranks the following countries as having the world's worst educational systems:

Countries with the Lowest Adult Literacy Rates

  • Education rankings are sourced from both the annual UN News Best Countries report and the nonprofit organization World Top 20

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Which country ranks first in education?

Which country ranks last in education, frequently asked questions.

  • Best Countries for Education - 2023 - US News
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  • World’s 10 Worst Countries for Education - Global Citizen
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Ontario requiring high school financial literacy test

Education minister says students will learn home economics, how to protect against fraud.

Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce speaks to journalists at Queen's Park in Toronto on Aug. 25, 2023.

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Ontario students will soon be required to pass a financial literacy test as part of a number of changes coming to the requirements needed to earn a high school diploma.

Education Minister Stephen Lecce says students will learn home economics such as managing a household budget and how to protect themselves against financial fraud.

He says students will need at least 70 per cent on the financial literacy test in order to graduate and it will first be offered in Grade 10 math.

Lecce says students will need the financial literacy requirement beginning in 2025.

"Too many parents, employers and students themselves tell me that students are graduating without sufficient financial literacy and basic life skills," Lecce said in a statement.

"By elevating life skills in the classroom, along with better career education and higher math standards on educators, we are setting up every student for lifelong success. Our bottom line: ensuring students graduate with practical learning that leads them to better jobs and bigger paycheques."

  • Ontario's 'back to basics' push in education: Here's what you need to know
  • Ontario kids are now taught Indigenous curriculum earlier. Here's why that matters, say advocates

The province will also reinstate the math proficiency test for students applying to teachers' college.

Lecce says the province will also modernize guidance and career education as it has not been updated since 2013.

With files from CBC News

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