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Problem-Solution Speech [Topics, Outline, Examples]

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Jim Peterson has over 20 years experience on speech writing. He wrote over 300 free speech topic ideas and how-to guides for any kind of public speaking and speech writing assignments at My Speech Class.

problem solution

In this article:

Problem-Solution Outline

Problem-solution examples, criminal justice, environment, relationships, teen issues.

What to include in your problem-solution speech or essay?

Problem-solution papers employ a nonfiction text structure, and typically contain the following elements:

Introduction: Introduce the problem and explain why the audience should be concerned about it.

Cause/Effect : Inform the audience on what causes the problem. In some cases, you may also need to take time to dispel common misconceptions people have about the real cause.

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Thesis Statement: The thesis typically lays out the problem and solution in the form of a question and answer. See examples below.

Solution : Explain the solution clearly and in detail, your problem-solving strategy, and reasons why your solution will work. In this section, be sure to answer common objections, such as “there is a better solution,” “your solution is too costly,” and “there are more important problems to solve.”

Call to Action: Summarize the problem and solution, and paint a picture of what will happen if your final solution is adopted. Also, let the reader know what steps they should take to help solve the problem.

These are the most used methods of developing and arranging:

Problem Solution Method Recommended if you have to argue that there is a social and current issue at stake and you have convince the listeners that you have the best solution. Introduce and provide background information to show what is wrong now.

List the best and ideal conditions and situations. Show the options. Analyze the proper criteria. And present your plan to solve the not wanted situation.

Problem Cause Solution Method Use this pattern for developing and identifying the source and its causes.

Analyze the causes and propose elucidations to the causes.

Problem Cause-Effect Method Use this method to outline the effects of the quandary and what causes it all. Prove the connection between financial, political, social causes and their effects.

Comparative Advantage Method Use this organizational public speaking pattern as recommendation in case everyone knows of the impasse and the different fixes and agrees that something has to be done.

Here are some examples of problems you could write about, with a couple of potential solutions for each one:

Marriage Problem: How do we reduce the divorce rate?

Solution 1: Change the laws to make it more difficult for couples to divorce.

Solution 2: Impose a mandatory waiting period on couples before they can get married.

Environmental Problem: What should we do to reduce the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?

Solution 1: Use renewable energy to fuel your home and vehicles.

Solution 2: Make recycling within local communities mandatory.

Technical Problem: How do we reduce Windows error reporting issues on PCs?

Solution 1: Learn to use dialogue boxes and other command prompt functions to keep your computer system clean.

Solution 2: Disable error reporting by making changes to the registry.

Some of the best problems to write about are those you have personal experience with. Think about your own world; the town you live in, schools you’ve attended, sports you’ve played, places you’ve worked, etc. You may find that you love problem-solution papers if you write them on a topic you identify with. To get your creativity flowing, feel free to browse our comprehensive list of problem-solution essay and paper topics and see if you can find one that interests you.

Problem-Solution Topics for Essays and Papers

  • How do we reduce murder rates in the inner cities?
  • How do we stop police brutality?
  • How do we prevent those who are innocent from receiving the death penalty?
  • How do we deal with the problem of gun violence?
  • How do we stop people from driving while intoxicated?
  • How do we prevent people from texting while driving?
  • How do we stop the growing child trafficking problem?
  • What is the best way to deal with domestic violence?
  • What is the best way to rehabilitate ex-cons?
  • How do we deal with the problem of overcrowded prisons?
  • How do we reduce binge drinking on college campuses?
  • How do we prevent sexual assaults on college campuses?
  • How do we make college tuition affordable?
  • What can students do to get better grades in college?
  • What is the best way for students to effectively balance their classes, studies, work, and social life?
  • What is the best way for college students to deal with a problem roommate?
  • How can college students overcome the problem of being homesick?
  • How can college students manage their finances more effectively?
  • What is the best way for college students to decide on a major?
  • What should be done about the problem of massive student loan debts?
  • How do we solve the global debt crisis?
  • How do we keep countries from employing child labor?
  • How do we reduce long-term unemployment?
  • How do we stop businesses from exploiting consumers?
  • How do we reduce inflation and bring down the cost of living?
  • How do we reduce the home foreclosure rate?
  • What should we do to discourage consumer debt?
  • What is the best way to stimulate economic growth?
  • How do we lower the prime cost of manufacturing raw materials?
  • How can book retailers deal with rising bookseller inventory costs and stay competitive with online sellers?
  • How do we prevent kids from cheating on exams?
  • How do we reduce the illiteracy rate?
  • How do we successfully integrate English as a Second Language (ESL) students into public schools?
  • How do we put an end to the problem of bullying in schools?
  • How do we effectively teach students life management skills?
  • How do we give everyone access to a quality education?
  • How do we develop a system to increase pay for good teachers and get rid of bad ones?
  • How do we teach kids to problem solve?
  • How should schools deal with the problem of disruptive students?
  • What can schools do to improve reading comprehension on standardized test scores?
  • What is the best way to teach sex education in public schools?
  • How do we teach students to recognize a noun clause?
  • How do we teach students the difference between average speed and average velocity?
  • How do we teach math students to use sign charts?
  • How can we make public education more like the Webspiration Classroom?
  • How do we stop pollution in major population centers?
  • How do we reduce the negative effects of climate change?
  • How do we encourage homeowners to lower their room temperature in the winter to reduce energy consumption?
  • What is the best way to preserve our precious natural resources?
  • How do we reduce our dependence on fossil fuels?
  • What is the best way to preserve the endangered wildlife?
  • What is the best way to ensure environmental justice?
  • How can we reduce the use of plastic?
  • How do we make alternative energy affordable?
  • How do we develop a sustainable transportation system?
  • How can we provide quality health care to all our citizens?
  • How do we incentivize people to stop smoking?
  • How do we address the growing doctor shortage?
  • How do we curb the growing obesity epidemic?
  • How do we reduce dependence on prescription drugs?
  • How do we reduce consumption of harmful substances like phosphoric acid and acetic acid?
  • How can we reduce the number of fatal hospital errors?
  • How do we handle the health costs of people living longer?
  • How can we encourage people to live healthier lifestyles?
  • How do we educate consumers on the risk of laxatives like magnesium hydroxide?
  • How do we end political corruption?
  • How do we address the problem of election fraud?
  • What is the best way to deal with rogue nations that threaten our survival?
  • What can our leaders do to bring about world peace?
  • How do we encourage students to become more active in the political process?
  • What can be done to encourage bipartisanship?
  • How can we prevent terrorism?
  • How do we protect individual privacy while keeping the country safe?
  • How can we encourage better candidates to run for office?
  • How do we force politicians to live by the rules they impose on everyone else?
  • What is the best way to get out of a bad relationship?
  • How do we prevent cyberbullying?
  • What is the best solution for depression?
  • How do you find out where you stand in a relationship?
  • What is the best way to help people who make bad life choices?
  • How can we learn to relate to people of different races and cultures?
  • How do we discourage humans from using robots as a substitute for relationships?
  • What is the best way to deal with a long-distance relationship?
  • How do we eliminate stereotypical thinking in relationships?
  • How do you successfully navigate the situation of dating a co-worker?
  • How do we deal with America’s growing drug problem?
  • How do we reduce food waste in restaurants?
  • How do we stop race and gender discrimination?
  • How do we stop animal cruelty?
  • How do we ensure that all citizens earn a livable wage?
  • How do we end sexual harassment in the workplace?
  • How do we deal with the water scarcity problem?
  • How do we effectively control the world’s population?
  • How can we put an end to homelessness?
  • How do we solve the world hunger crisis?
  • How do we address the shortage of parking spaces in downtown areas?
  • How can our cities be made more bike- and pedestrian-friendly?
  • How do we balance the right of free speech and the right not to be abused?
  • How can we encourage people to use public transportation?
  • How do we bring neighborhoods closer together?
  • How can we eliminate steroid use in sports?
  • How do we protect players from serious injuries?
  • What is the best way to motivate young athletes?
  • What can be done to drive interest in local sports?
  • How do players successfully prepare for a big game or match?
  • How should the revenue from professional sports be divided between owners and players?
  • What can be done to improve local sports venues?
  • What can be done to ensure parents and coaches are not pushing kids too hard in sports?
  • How can student athletes maintain high academic standards while playing sports?
  • What can athletes do to stay in shape during the off-season?
  • How do we reduce teen pregnancy?
  • How do we deal with the problem of teen suicide?
  • How do we keep teens from dropping out of high school?
  • How do we train teens to be safer drivers?
  • How do we prevent teens from accessing pornography on the Internet?
  • What is the best way to help teens with divorced parents?
  • How do we discourage teens from playing violent video games?
  • How should parents handle their teens’ cell phone and social media use?
  • How do we prepare teens to be better workers?
  • How do we provide a rational decision-making model for teens?
  • How do we keep companies from mining our private data online and selling it for profit?
  • How do we prevent artificial intelligence robots from taking over society?
  • How do we make high-speed internet accessible in rural areas?
  • How do we stop hackers from breaking into our systems and networks?
  • How do we make digital payments more secure?
  • How do we make self-driving vehicles safer?
  • What is the best way to improve the battery life of mobile devices?
  • How can we store energy gleaned from solar and wind power?
  • What is the best way to deal with information overload?
  • How do we stop computer makers from pre-installing Internet Explorer?

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Public Speaking Resources

80+ Problem Solution Speech Topics

A problem/solution speech takes the approach of highlighting an issue with the intent to provide solutions. It is a two-phase approach where first the speaker lays out the problem and explains the importance. Secondly, a variety of solutions are provided to tackle the said issue. The best solutions are those that can be actively applied.

The first problem to tackle is picking a topic. It is a good idea to pick something topical but then again, the world just supplies so many options that it can be overwhelming.

When you are assigned to write a problem-solution essay or research paper, choosing a good topic is the first dilemma you need to work out. 

The world is full of issues that need to be resolved. However, it is not sufficient to simply pick a subject because it is topical. Ideally, you should pick a subject that is important to you on some level as well. Speaking about an issue you care about brings out an irreplicable passion that people are sure to respond to. If you’re still confused, we have included a wide variety of topics so that you can pick one that calls out to you.

Let’s get started!

Problem Solution Speech Topics

Table of Contents

  • Introduction: 
  • Thesis Statement: 
  • Cause/Effect: 
  • Call to Action: 

Problem Solution Method

Comparative advantage method, social issues, environment, relationships, wrapping up, problem/solution speech outline.

Before we jump into the topics, it can be handy to understand the speech structure of a problem-solution speech. Understanding how to approach a speech script can have an effect on the topic you pick. Oftentimes, we are confident we can speak about a subject but once we begin the draft, we realize we don’t actually have that much to say.

So take a good look at what elements you need to include in your problem/solution speech:

Introduction:  

The introduction is a key part of any speech. This is where you will try to grab the audience’s attention, establish the problem statement, and highlight your key points. It is in your introduction that you will need to explain why the presented issue is an issue. The objective is to convince the audience that the problem at hand is one that requires attention.

If you need help with effective attention-grabbers, you can browse our article on 12 Effective Attention-Grabbers for your speech .

Thesis Statement:  

The thesis statement is where you will present the problem you are about to tackle. Typically the problem is laid out in the form of a question. You will also be talking about your stance on the presented problem.

Cause/Effect:  

Before you launch into giving solutions after highlighting the problem, you need to explain the gravity of the problem at hand. You can do so by explaining what negative consequences occur due to said problem. The more you personalize the effects, the more likely you are to capture their attention.

Solution:  

Once you talk about all the negative impacts of the presented problem, it is time to give the audience the solutions. Explain all the solutions step-by-step and talk about the evidence why the said solution will work. Make sure not to give solutions that are too vague. If there are common misconceptions about the solutions, address them as well. Discuss both pros and cons of the proposed solutions and explain why the pros outweigh the cons.

Call to Action:  

The most important part of a problem/solution type speech is the call to action. This is when you encourage the audience to take the necessary steps to solve the problem. You can do so by painting a picture of the expected results of your proposed solutions. Don’t end on a vague note that sounds like “Together, we can.” Instead, give actionable steps, such as “I encourage each and every one of you to go home and separate your recycling trash.”

Problem/Solution Presentation Techniques

There is more than one way to present a problem/solution model. You might want to look into these techniques to switch up your speaking style.

The classic take is best used for taking a stance against a social or current issue. In such a case, you will highlight a known issue and suggest probable solutions for it. You can approach this method by informing the audience about the issue, a brief history, all geared to explain why the topic is a problem in the first place.

Follow that up by describing an ideal condition without the said issue. Once you create a tempting picture, offer up more than one solution that is applicable to the situation. Explain the hurdles and how they can be overcome. Make sure it is clear that you’ve thought about the problem from both sides of the issue.

Comparative advantage models are useful when tackling a problem that seems to be at an impasse. It is when an issue is well known and has multiple fixes with their own group of supporters. Here, you can take a comparative approach to show the pros and cons of all the different solutions. The key difference is that the general consensus is already there about the importance of tackling the problem, but only the correct solution needs to be selected.

Problem-Solution Speech Topics

Here is our extensive list of problem/solution speech topics:

  • Adopting dogs is more ethical than getting a new puppy.
  • How education can solve generational poverty.
  • Tackling anxiety by adopting a pet.
  • Ebooks over books to save the environment.
  • One-child policy: unethical but effective.
  • Donating as a solution to fight global poverty.
  • Do your part, go vegan to fight world hunger.
  • Keep wikipedia alive for free information with donations.
  • Kindness can begin with a compliment.
  • What can we do to ensure government sanctions against companies using child labor?
  • Sorting out your waste and what it can do for the environment.
  • The necessary switch to bicycles to tackle pollution.
  • Why encouraging volunteering at an early age can produce better citizens.
  • High time to make the switch to solar and wind energy.
  • Self-driving cars are the future of road safety.
  • Bike lanes and bike laws enhance traffic safety.
  • Effective gun sales management can help reduce reckless deaths.
  • Normalize selling colored dolls in all shapes and sizes to promote confidence in children.
  • How data became the new oil?
  • How to stay private in an increasingly social world?
  • Why is high-speed internet still not considered a basic need for rural areas?
  • Ethical hacking and why is there a draw to it?
  • Digital payments and how to guarantee security.
  • Change your passwords. Why your data is in danger!
  • Self-driving vehicles, should we handover 100% of the control?
  • Have lithium batteries on mobile phones already reached their peak?
  • How can technology promote the use of renewable energy?
  • How to keep up with the overwhelming news cycle?
  • How can we destigmatize video game addiction?
  • How can we shift education to a virtual platform?
  • How to smoothen the transition from home-schooling to college.
  • What are some new methods to tackle the rampant cheating on exams?
  • How can we reduce the illiteracy rate?
  • It’s high time to end bullying in schools.
  • How to normalize homesickness as a problem and tackle it?
  • Education is not enough, students need life management skills.
  • Is accessibility to quality education sufficient currently?
  • How can we guarantee sufficient pay for quality teachers?
  • How can problem-solving be taught in schools?
  • Is detention an effective solution for disruptive students?
  • How you can help your suicidal friend.
  • Are we doing enough to improve standardized test score results?
  • Effective ways to increase attention in class.
  • How can we make sex education mandatory in public schools?
  • Creative ways to get students to love maths.
  • Does looking at the stars stimulate brain activity?
  • How can we tackle the growing obesity epidemic?
  • How spending time outdoors can boost your mood.
  • The Pomodoro Technique and why it works for productivity.
  • Can meditation be the answer to growing stress?
  • Can we incentivize smokers to give up smoking?
  • How to increase responsibility for fatal hospital errors?
  • Fitness apps and how it can benefit health.
  • How augmented reality glasses can be a gamechanger for people with disabilities.
  • How does taking baths reduce stress and anxiety?
  • Burnout: the need to go offline.
  • Better posture to tackle back pain.
  • Does reading out loud help improve critical thinking?
  • Child obesity: a preventable evil.
  • Encouraging more greens to help children improve their memory.
  • How global pollution can be tackled locally.
  • Climate change. Why it is too late and what can still be done.
  • Does lower room temperature really help reduce energy consumption?
  • How to do our part in preserving natural resources?
  • Is it time to stop depending on fossil fuels?
  • How to preserve wildlife from going extinct?
  • Are current environmental laws sufficient to keep it protected?
  • Improving public transport to reduce the number of private cars.
  • How can we upgrade our transportation to be more sustainable?
  • Why hunting should be illegal in any circumstances.
  • It is high time to replace plastic. What are our options?
  • Is it enough to make alternative energy affordable?
  • Signs of a toxic relationship.
  • How to pull yourself out of an emotionally abusive relationship.
  • Should parents be allowed to control teens’ social media accounts?
  • How to manage expectations in a relationship?
  • Recognize negative people and take active steps to avoid them.
  • How to help domestic violence victims?
  • Why it is pointless to try changing someone.
  • How to say “no” in a way that they listen?
  • How to maintain a work-life balance in today’s world.
  • Why couples counseling needs to stop being taboo.
  • Is it possible to bridge the gap across different races and cultures?
  • How technology is capitalizing on the growing need for human contact.
  • Long-distance relationships. Can you make it work?
  • Modern-day relationships and how expectations have changed.

A problem/solution speech is a great topic as it falls under the informational category. As such, it is much easier to capture the audience’s attention. In terms of delivery, make sure you sell the problem before handing out the solution. Following the above outline and tips paired with your amazing content, we are sure you will be able to win over any audience with ease. Make sure you do your research well and triple-check your sources. All that is left to do is practice. See you on the stage!

Public Speaking Mentor

Problem Solution Speech Topics, Outline & Examples

delivering problem-solution speech

The problem solution speech is a type of informative speech that enumerates various problems and provides possible solutions to those problems.

If you have been asked to give such a speech, your goal should be to explain the problem and provide realistic and achievable suggestions to address it. In most cases, problem solution speeches are given with the hope that the audience will be inspired to do something about the problems that they are facing.

There are many pressing issues in society today that could be considered ripe material for a problem solution speech. For example, racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism, and ageism are all major social problems that need to be addressed.

Of course, you can’t just pick any old problem and start talking about it – you need to make sure that your topic is something that your audience will actually care about and be interested in hearing.

Problem-Solution Speech Outline

The key to delivering an effective problem-solution speech is to develop an outline and a step-by-step plan that will help focus on different parts of your speech.

Here is a basic outline that you can use for your problem-solution speech:

Introduction

Introduce yourself and give a brief overview of the problem that you will be discussing. This is also where you will need to state your thesis – that is, what solution you think is best for the problem.

Make sure that you are concise and to the point – you don’t want to give your audience too much information, as they will likely tune out if you do.

Thesis/Statement of the problem

Explain what the problem is that you will be discussing. This is where you will need to do your research and really dig into the details of the issue so it is interesting and your speech has gravity.

Also, make sure that your problem is something that can actually be solved – there is no point in discussing a problem if there is no possible solution.

Cause/Effect

Discuss the causes of the problem and the effects that it has on different people or groups. This is where you will really start to get into the nitty-gritty of your topic and show your audience that you understand the issue at hand.

Make sure to back up any claims that you make with research or data so that your speech is credible. Use attention getters to hook your audience and keep them interested.

Potential solutions

This is the meat of your problem-solution speech. Discuss different potential solutions to the problem and explain why you think they would be effective.

Again, make sure to back up your claims with research or data so that your audience knows that you have thoughtfully considered the issue and possible solutions. Keep it realistic – don’t propose a solution that is impossible to achieve.

Call to action

You have now armed your audience with the knowledge of the problem and potential solutions – now what? You will need to challenge your audience to actually do something about the issue.

This could be something as simple as signing a petition or donating to a cause, or it could be something more ambitious like starting a new organization or campaign. Whatever you choose, make sure it is achievable and that your audience knows how they can take action.

Use the outline above to tailor the specifics of your speech to fit your particular audience and situation and deliver an effective problem-solution speech.

Problem-Solution Presentation Techniques

Once you have your outline ready, it’s time to start working on your delivery. Here are some tips to keep in mind as you prepare your problem-solution speech:

  • Be passionate : This is not the time for a dry, academic approach. You need to be enthusiastic about the issue at hand and really sell your audience on why they should care.
  • Be clear : Make sure that your audience understands the problem and potential solutions. Use straightforward language and avoid jargon.
  • Be concise : Remember, you only have a limited amount of time to make your case. Get to the point and don’t ramble.
  • Use stories : A personal story or anecdote can be a powerful way to connect with your audience and make your speech more relatable.
  • Use visuals : Visual aids can be a great way to engage your audience and break up your speech. Just make sure that they are clear and easy to understand.
  • Practice, practice, practice : The only way to get comfortable with delivering a problem-solution speech is to practice it as much as you can. So get in front of a mirror, or even better, ask a friend or family member to listen to you and give feedback. The more you practice, the more confident you will be and overcome your fear of public speaking .

Problem-Solution Speech Topics

1. How can we make sure that all animals are treated humanely?

2. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to animal welfare?

3. How can we make sure that all animals have access to proper care and shelter?

4. Why should we care about animal rights?

5. Why is wildlife conservation important?

6. Why animal testing is cruel?

7. Why should the exotic pet trade be stopped?

9. What can we do about the food industry and mass animal killing?

1. How can we make sure that our technology is accessible to everyone?

2. What are the most important things to keep in mind when using social media?

3. How can we make sure that our online information is safe and secure?

4. What should we do about cyberbullying?

6. How can we make sure that our technology is sustainable?

7. What are the most important things to keep in mind when using new technology?

8. How can we make sure that our technology is user-friendly?

9. What should we do about outdated technology?

10. How can we make sure that our technology is accessible to people with disabilities?

11. What are the most important things to keep in mind when using technology in the classroom?

12. How can we make sure that our technology is used for good and not for evil?

13. What should we do about the digital divide?

14. How can we make sure that our technology is used responsibly?

15. What should we do about the growing problem of e-waste?

16. What are the most important things to keep in mind when using technology in the workplace?

17. What should we do about the increasing dependence on technology?

Relationships

1. How can we improve communication in relationships?

2. What are the biggest problems faced by long-distance relationships?

3. How can we make sure that our relationships are built on trust?

4. What causes jealousy in relationships and how can it be overcome?

5. When is it time to end a relationship?

6. How can we deal with infidelity in a relationship?

7. How can we make sure that our relationships are healthy and balanced?

8. What causes arguments in relationships and how can they be resolved?

9. What are the most important things to keep in mind when raising a family?

10. How can single parents make sure that their children are getting the attention they need?

11. What effect does social media have on relationships?

12. How can we make sure that our relationship with our parents is healthy and supportive?

13. What should we do when our friends or family get into a toxic relationship?

14. How can we deal with envy or jealousy within our friendships?

15. How can we deal with a friend or family member who is going through a tough break-up?

16. How can new relationships be started off on the right foot?

17. What are the most important things to keep in mind when moving in with a partner?

18. What should we do when our relationship starts to fizzle out?

19. How can we deal with the death of a loved one?

20. How can therapy help us improve our relationships?

Social Issues

1. How can we make sure that everyone has access to clean water?

2. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to food security?

3. How can we make sure that all children have access to education?

4. What are the most effective ways of helping people who are homeless?

5. How can we make sure that everyone has access to healthcare?

6. What are the most effective ways of combating climate change?

7. How can we make sure that our cities are sustainable?

8. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to transportation?

9. How can we make sure that our economy is fair and just?

10. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to social inequality?

11. How can we make sure that our government is effective and efficient?

12. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to voting?

13. How can we make sure that our media is responsible and ethical?

14. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to privacy?

15. How can we make sure that our technology is used responsibly?

16. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to security?

17. How can we make sure that our world is peaceful?

18. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to human rights?

19. How can we make sure that our world is sustainable?

20. What are the most important things to keep in mind when it comes to the environment?

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10.2 Using Common Organizing Patterns

Learning objectives.

  • Differentiate among the common speech organizational patterns: categorical/topical, comparison/contrast, spatial, chronological, biographical, causal, problem-cause-solution, and psychological.
  • Understand how to choose the best organizational pattern, or combination of patterns, for a specific speech.

A motivational poster of water running over rocks. The caption says

Twentyfour Students – Organization makes you flow – CC BY-SA 2.0.

Previously in this chapter we discussed how to make your main points flow logically. This section is going to provide you with a number of organization patterns to help you create a logically organized speech. The first organization pattern we’ll discuss is categorical/topical.

Categorical/Topical

By far the most common pattern for organizing a speech is by categories or topics. The categories function as a way to help the speaker organize the message in a consistent fashion. The goal of a categorical/topical speech pattern is to create categories (or chunks) of information that go together to help support your original specific purpose. Let’s look at an example.

In this case, we have a speaker trying to persuade a group of high school juniors to apply to attend Generic University. To persuade this group, the speaker has divided the information into three basic categories: what it’s like to live in the dorms, what classes are like, and what life is like on campus. Almost anyone could take this basic speech and specifically tailor the speech to fit her or his own university or college. The main points in this example could be rearranged and the organizational pattern would still be effective because there is no inherent logic to the sequence of points. Let’s look at a second example.

In this speech, the speaker is talking about how to find others online and date them. Specifically, the speaker starts by explaining what Internet dating is; then the speaker talks about how to make Internet dating better for her or his audience members; and finally, the speaker ends by discussing some negative aspects of Internet dating. Again, notice that the information is chunked into three categories or topics and that the second and third could be reversed and still provide a logical structure for your speech

Comparison/Contrast

Another method for organizing main points is the comparison/contrast speech pattern . While this pattern clearly lends itself easily to two main points, you can also create a third point by giving basic information about what is being compared and what is being contrasted. Let’s look at two examples; the first one will be a two-point example and the second a three-point example.

If you were using the comparison/contrast pattern for persuasive purposes, in the preceding examples, you’d want to make sure that when you show how Drug X and Drug Y differ, you clearly state why Drug X is clearly the better choice for physicians to adopt. In essence, you’d want to make sure that when you compare the two drugs, you show that Drug X has all the benefits of Drug Y, but when you contrast the two drugs, you show how Drug X is superior to Drug Y in some way.

The spatial speech pattern organizes information according to how things fit together in physical space. This pattern is best used when your main points are oriented to different locations that can exist independently. The basic reason to choose this format is to show that the main points have clear locations. We’ll look at two examples here, one involving physical geography and one involving a different spatial order.

If you look at a basic map of the United States, you’ll notice that these groupings of states were created because of their geographic location to one another. In essence, the states create three spatial territories to explain.

Now let’s look at a spatial speech unrelated to geography.

In this example, we still have three basic spatial areas. If you look at a model of the urinary system, the first step is the kidney, which then takes waste through the ureters to the bladder, which then relies on the sphincter muscle to excrete waste through the urethra. All we’ve done in this example is create a spatial speech order for discussing how waste is removed from the human body through the urinary system. It is spatial because the organization pattern is determined by the physical location of each body part in relation to the others discussed.

Chronological

The chronological speech pattern places the main idea in the time order in which items appear—whether backward or forward. Here’s a simple example.

In this example, we’re looking at the writings of Winston Churchill in relation to World War II (before, during, and after). By placing his writings into these three categories, we develop a system for understanding this material based on Churchill’s own life. Note that you could also use reverse chronological order and start with Churchill’s writings after World War II, progressing backward to his earliest writings.

Biographical

As you might guess, the biographical speech pattern is generally used when a speaker wants to describe a person’s life—either a speaker’s own life, the life of someone they know personally, or the life of a famous person. By the nature of this speech organizational pattern, these speeches tend to be informative or entertaining; they are usually not persuasive. Let’s look at an example.

In this example, we see how Brian Warner, through three major periods of his life, ultimately became the musician known as Marilyn Manson.

In this example, these three stages are presented in chronological order, but the biographical pattern does not have to be chronological. For example, it could compare and contrast different periods of the subject’s life, or it could focus topically on the subject’s different accomplishments.

The causal speech pattern is used to explain cause-and-effect relationships. When you use a causal speech pattern, your speech will have two basic main points: cause and effect. In the first main point, typically you will talk about the causes of a phenomenon, and in the second main point you will then show how the causes lead to either a specific effect or a small set of effects. Let’s look at an example.

In this case, the first main point is about the history and prevalence of drinking alcohol among Native Americans (the cause). The second point then examines the effects of Native American alcohol consumption and how it differs from other population groups.

However, a causal organizational pattern can also begin with an effect and then explore one or more causes. In the following example, the effect is the number of arrests for domestic violence.

In this example, the possible causes for the difference might include stricter law enforcement, greater likelihood of neighbors reporting an incident, and police training that emphasizes arrests as opposed to other outcomes. Examining these possible causes may suggest that despite the arrest statistic, the actual number of domestic violence incidents in your city may not be greater than in other cities of similar size.

Problem-Cause-Solution

Another format for organizing distinct main points in a clear manner is the problem-cause-solution speech pattern . In this format you describe a problem, identify what you believe is causing the problem, and then recommend a solution to correct the problem.

In this speech, the speaker wants to persuade people to pass a new curfew for people under eighteen. To help persuade the civic group members, the speaker first shows that vandalism and violence are problems in the community. Once the speaker has shown the problem, the speaker then explains to the audience that the cause of this problem is youth outside after 10:00 p.m. Lastly, the speaker provides the mandatory 10:00 p.m. curfew as a solution to the vandalism and violence problem within the community. The problem-cause-solution format for speeches generally lends itself to persuasive topics because the speaker is asking an audience to believe in and adopt a specific solution.

Psychological

A further way to organize your main ideas within a speech is through a psychological speech pattern in which “a” leads to “b” and “b” leads to “c.” This speech format is designed to follow a logical argument, so this format lends itself to persuasive speeches very easily. Let’s look at an example.

In this speech, the speaker starts by discussing how humor affects the body. If a patient is exposed to humor (a), then the patient’s body actually physiologically responds in ways that help healing (b—e.g., reduces stress, decreases blood pressure, bolsters one’s immune system, etc.). Because of these benefits, nurses should engage in humor use that helps with healing (c).

Selecting an Organizational Pattern

Each of the preceding organizational patterns is potentially useful for organizing the main points of your speech. However, not all organizational patterns work for all speeches. For example, as we mentioned earlier, the biographical pattern is useful when you are telling the story of someone’s life. Some other patterns, particularly comparison/contrast, problem-cause-solution, and psychological, are well suited for persuasive speaking. Your challenge is to choose the best pattern for the particular speech you are giving.

You will want to be aware that it is also possible to combine two or more organizational patterns to meet the goals of a specific speech. For example, you might wish to discuss a problem and then compare/contrast several different possible solutions for the audience. Such a speech would thus be combining elements of the comparison/contrast and problem-cause-solution patterns. When considering which organizational pattern to use, you need to keep in mind your specific purpose as well as your audience and the actual speech material itself to decide which pattern you think will work best.

Key Takeaway

  • Speakers can use a variety of different organizational patterns, including categorical/topical, comparison/contrast, spatial, chronological, biographical, causal, problem-cause-solution, and psychological. Ultimately, speakers must really think about which organizational pattern best suits a specific speech topic.
  • Imagine that you are giving an informative speech about your favorite book. Which organizational pattern do you think would be most useful? Why? Would your answer be different if your speech goal were persuasive? Why or why not?
  • Working on your own or with a partner, develop three main points for a speech designed to persuade college students to attend your university. Work through the preceding organizational patterns and see which ones would be possible choices for your speech. Which organizational pattern seems to be the best choice? Why?
  • Use one of the common organizational patterns to create three main points for your next speech.

Stand up, Speak out Copyright © 2016 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Problem Solution Speech Topics Ideas

Problem Solution Speech Topics Ideas

Problem solution speech topics ideas should be aimed at fulfilling two aims of problem-solving:

  • To convey a specific problem you have chosen to reflect on;
  • To provide persuasive solutions to it.

How to Choose a Problem and Make the Essay Interesting

The matter of selecting a problem for discussion and critical analysis directly depends on the type of target audience you will present a paper. For instance, if the audience consists of people belonging to a specific profession or research area, then, before designing a problem-solution speech outline, it would be logical to come up with a topic connected with their area of research or the scope of their interest. There are also cases when the audience selects the topic of presentation or speech for you beforehand. If it is a general audience, then it is prudent to select topics that are controversial, appealing to the general public, or that are rather challenging, such as environmental concerns and threats, ethical dilemmas, financial aspects, crime rates in the community, international problems and challenges, and so on. With these tips in mind, you will definitely provide the best proposal speech ever.

Another method to come up with the right entertainment speech ideas is to ask the event organizer to gather ideas from the audience regarding what topics they would love to hear about and further discuss.

On the whole, whatever method of topic selection you choose, the most important thing is to make sure you have sufficient evidence and clear illustrative examples to reflect on the topic in-depth and provide convincing arguments. In any case, if you are lost among the ideas for the topic discussion, opt for one of your personal experience speech ideas.

Whatever method you use to select your problem topic, ensure that you have clear examples, convincing facts, or credible data that supports your position on the matter.

How to Find Solutions

The solutions and recommendations that you put forward should be practical and resourceful. Besides, it should be clear how exactly they can be applied to the real case you are discussing. As you are contemplating how the solution will be effective, keep in mind that your audience will be involved in their own reflection on the topic as well. So, make sure you are persuasive enough.

How to Provide Proper Support for Your Argument

Supporting examples can be related to your personal experience with the help of which you can make the argument stronger and more convincing. When critically analyzing the topic, make sure you know how much the audience knows about it. If much information is left to be explained, interpreted, and so on, make sure you do it. If there is a need to provide background information to make everything clear, then do it as well.

On the contrary, if the audience comprises experts in the scope of research you have focused on, they will surely expect more originality and novelty from you. Therefore, make sure you provide adequate problem-solving examples for your proposal paper. Generally known standard information won’t be the best option.

If the listeners are complete novices to the topic, then try to introduce them to the topic gradually. When it comes to solutions, make sure they are more related to tried and tested principles and approaches. If you are delivering a speech to an audience that is not well-versed in the topic of your proposal essay, then it is recommended to provide a detailed and clear discussion wherein you provide a solution right after each problem you mention.

Problem-solution articles can also have such a structure where you provide the causes of the issue prior to the discussion of solutions. This strategy comes in handy as concentrating on the underlying cause assists in providing more solid support for the explanations, thus providing more reliability and credibility to the solutions.

Moreover, your personal viewpoint on the central issue should be presented in the process of proposing a solution. This way, your speech will be more convincing in that you will share your experience with the people who listen to you.

Concluding your problem/solution speech, make sure you provide a brief synopsis of the core issues, particularly solutions as your audience should remember them particularly well.

The Best Problem Solution Speech Topics for College Students

Professors frequently assign problem-solution speech topics for college students either for written assignments or oral presentations. Regardless of the type of speech topics for college that you have been assigned, you need to select a topic that is of particular interest to you and your target audience. Only when you demonstrate originality in the choice of your topic will you stand out as an original speaker/ writer and will thus be more appreciated by your professor and the audience. When you want just to provide an overview of the problem, then you have to search among the list of good informative speech topics for college students. Still, when you need to demonstrate your skills in critical and analytical writing, it is recommended to organize the essay as a persuasive one.

From the persuasive writing prompts enlisted below, try to select the one that you are well versed in and that aroused the greatest deal of interest in you. Only with these two basic criteria kept in mind will you be able to provide a successfully written problem-solution persuasive paper.

A List of Problem Cause Solution Persuasive Speech Topics for College Students

The list of problem-cause solution persuasive speech topics provided below will help you come up with interesting research ideas for your speech. Take a look at the numerous options for social issues and other problems in society to write about.

  • The problem of spying and media leaks in international and domestic communications.
  • How to ensure local food movement support? Will it have a positive impact on the local entrepreneurship?
  • The restrictions on the exploitation of the Antarctic resources should be maintained and the Antarctic should be viewed as a preserved place merely devoted to science.
  • Media marketed for youths and teens convey immoral and unethical ideas.
  • The FBI should keep the self-proclaimed militia under scrutiny.
  • Tax incentives should be introduced for adopting children internationally.
  • Foreign help to dictatorships should be eradicated by the government.
  • Online learning can be equaled to classroom education in terms of its effectiveness and accessibility.
  • In-vitro fertilization should be prohibited.
  • The issue of minors getting tattoos should be more controlled by legal institutions: minors should either be accompanied by their guardians or be given written consent from them.
  • Dependence on ACT and SAT scores during admissions should be abolished.
  • Surveillance cameras should record all trials in court.
  • Student-athletes representing their educational establishment in competitions should be given scholarships to cover at least partial college expenses.
  • All students should be encouraged to enroll in foreign language courses and speaking clubs.
  • Usage of technological advancement in teaching.
  • Beauty contests in schools and colleges should be banned.
  • Staffed flights into space are far more expensive than unstaffed research missions.
  • Students should not be harshly encouraged or pushed to participate in sports competitions.
  • The federal government should adopt a law that standardizes trunk release systems in new transport.
  • Race, ethnicity, and gender equality should be supported in politics.
  • Mobile phone usage, texting, and Internet use in the classroom prevent students from being involved in the studying process and lower their attention span.
  • The usage of paperback textbooks should be eradicated and changed into e-book usage.
  • College students should be more cautious and prudent when posting controversial or personal information online.
  • The acute immigration problem will hardly ever be solved by constructing the border fence.
  • Cyber-attacks pose threats internationally.
  • Recycling should be encouraged worldwide.
  • The contemporary taxation system does not fairly treat lower-income and middle-income population groups.
  • Media advertisements targeted at children population should be banned by the government.
  • Oil companies should get disaster control before engaging in offshore drilling.
  • Feminists’ standpoint devalues family and motherhood.
  • The problem of identity theft is extremely aggravated and the community should pay attention to it.
  • Girls should be prohibited from participating in football and wrestling competitions.
  • Social networks do not interfere with school education.
  • Networks in educational establishments should have special filters to prevent students from accessing inappropriate material.
  • The pressing need for school system reform.
  • Advertisements engaging children should be restricted at the government level.
  • Fast food restaurants should initiate the campaign of publicly displaying calories next to each meal.
  • The government should release churches from tax incentives.
  • Patients suffering from chronic mental diseases should be preserved in “halfway houses” instead of mental hospitals.
  • The government should not allow the allocation of billboards on interstate highways.
  • Weapons should not be sold internationally across the countries.
  • Marriage should not be allowed before school graduation.
  • The role of the United Nations internationally.
  • The role of art and music therapy in patients’ rehabilitation.
  • Educated people should work as tutors of literacy on a voluntary basis in third-world countries.
  • People molesting children should be restricted from the right to adopt.
  • Psychologists and psychiatrists should witness and testify in the court of law representing the non-guilty-by-reason-of-insanity.
  • Security should be increased in motels and hotels as a means to guarantee security for all its residents regardless of their income.
  • The National Health Insurance Program is supposed to provide basic health care for all US citizens independent of their income.
  • The construction and building of venues before the Olympic Games should be banned by UNESCO as it harms a lot.

Evidently, the argument topics list entails current issues that are taking place in the contemporary world. To submit a successful paper, make sure to conduct in-depth research on your selected topic and create an impressive paper that will last in memory for a long.

Problem Solution Speech on the Topic of Policy Advocacy

The question of policy persuasive speech topics remains extremely acute for students because frequently they do not know where to start after they have read numerous essay samples. Particularly, students may be confused about the way of organizing information for a speech. To ease the task of writing a properly structured speech paper, check out the following recommended way of paper organization for a policy advocacy speech.

I. Introduction

Attention-grabber: you might provide some controversial fact, relate to personal experience, provide shocking/ impressive statistics, use a rhetorical question or a dramatic quote, etc. (all these devices are used for capturing attention from the target audience);

Relation to the audience: Pinpoint to how the issue under discussion relates to the target audience. Do it either implicitly or explicitly, but regardless of the option you choose, make sure the listeners understand their relation to the topic. If you have chosen to focus on a problem seriously affecting people, express your point of view on how exactly the problem influences the audience.

Credibility of the problem: Emphasize the problem’s significance and why it is worth others’ attention. Provide one or more reasons to make the audience understand why you have decided to speak on this subject area.

Preview: Provide a brief synopsis (overview) of the paper. You need to provide sufficient background information on the topic, especially if the audience is not well-versed in it. For example, you might briefly describe the problem in a few words and then switch over to focusing on the possible solutions.

II. Body: The Problem Identification and Solution Proposal

Identify the problem: Develop a paragraph where you provide an overview of the central problem. Appeal to ratio and emotion, as it is preferable to engage the reader both on an intellectual and emotional level. There are two recommended ways of problem identification and development – qualitative and quantitative.

According to the qualitative approach, you have to present argumentation for the claims that answer the following questions:

  • What makes me indifferent about the problem? Or why should I actually care?
  • How am I affected by the problem?
  • How serious is the issue under discussion?

To help readers understand the problem in depth, make sure to provide examples from your personal experience or provide real-life examples related to other people. This data will not make the statistics too narrow but will add more appealing details to demonstrate how serious the issue is.

According to the quantitative approach, the arguments and support you provide should be related to such questions:

  • How large is the problem?
  • How much is it widespread and what is the problem scope?

When a writer investigates the scope of the problem, the larger it is – the less detailed evidence is required.

Focus on the causes: The causes of the problem should be closely examined: provide ample evidence, examples, and recent study results. Keep in mind that not every topic requires developing the problem’s causes. Still, if you think that the causes you provide will make the audience more susceptible to trusting your viewpoint. Such an approach is used when there exist multiple opinions on causes.

Put forward the solution: When investigating the possible solution(s), make sure to organize the information in the following way:

  • Provide a plan: First and foremost, pinpoint the exact change in policy, law, or campaign you are suggesting. Briefly describe the step (the introduction of the new law, implementation of the new program, short synopsis of the program, etc.). The main aim at this point is to make the audience understand the kind of change you are suggesting.
  • Provide supporting argumentation and evidence for the suggested solutions: You should clearly pinpoint how the solution will eliminate the ongoing risks or threats caused by the pending problem. Make sure that you link supporting evidence to the plan.

Provide credible expert evidence that clearly highlights the ways the solution would reduce the burning issue: When citing outside sources and specific examples/ materials researched by scholars, make sure you tell the audience about the credentials of the researchers. Your target audience should be sure that the information you rely on can be trusted and that is it believable overall. If you provide information that even you don’t know by whom it was put forward, then your paper will have no expert value.

Results of the study: If the research included some experimental study that aimed at supporting your solution, make sure you discuss the results and interpret them properly. Provide a brief synopsis of how many people took part in the experiment/ interview/ sociological study and what the results indicate.

Empirical evidence and pilot studies: With the help of such supporting evidence, you will emphasize that the problem has solutions related to real-life events and experiences. You might also pinpoint how small changes in the localities might affect the problem in a large-scale area. Such supporting evidence is really beneficial as it indicates that the effects happened in real surroundings with real people rather than in a laboratory environment.

Personal or peer testimony: It is not recommended to use this evidence as a priority as it is rather weak on its own. Still, if you add this evidence together with the other aforementioned types, it can significantly add up to the paper’s credibility.

Address general disadvantages: When coming up with a policy change, keep in mind that it can solve the existing problem as well as create a new one. Therefore, it is advisable to outline the potential disadvantages of the problem after you have discussed its benefits and positive effects. To make your position strong, make sure to refute the counter-arguments because when you just ignore the negative aspects, the audience will not accept or perceive your solution.

III. Conclusion

Provide a short review of the persisting problem and suggested ways out. Make sure you provide a call for action at the end of the conclusive paragraph, where you provide encouraging information that will make the audience remember your paper.

  • Review of the problem and solution
  • Closing thought to encourage the audience to remember the speech.

Problem Solution Topics for Your Perfect Speech

The problem solution speech topics that you will find below will help you choose, identify, and organize the way of presenting your essay. As you select the topic, you will research it properly in order to persuade the audience that a particular problem exists and that it is possible to come up with solutions to it. Moreover, you will learn how to convince the audience and make them accept your viewpoint and maybe even change their previously existing biases regarding the issue. Before you start the topic selection process, make sure you are well aware of the core elements that are necessary in such a type of writing. Check them out:

  • Indicate the problem and mention specifically what factors make it an actual problem. Provide sufficient background information, pinpoint to the problem’s significance, and let the audience understand the scope of the problem and its overall effect. Make sure you appeal to reasoning and emotion: let the audience understand the needs so that it is convinced by the information you provide.
  • Advocate for a solution and provide a detailed plan on how it can be applied in practice.
  • Visualize the practical aspect of your solution. Demonstrate how the solutions will come in handy in improving the situation. Emphasize on their practical aspect and general effectiveness. Pay attention to a brief discussion of alternatives with which you do not agree. State how they are impractical and problematic. To put it briefly, you need to highlight the counterarguments and refute them.
  • Call to action. Convince the audience to accept your position on the change implementation of the proposed policy or campaign. Or provide an implicit call to action, wherein you make a hint on the policy change.

How to Choose a Proper Problem Solution Speech Topic

If you have been invited to deliver a speech to the public, first of all, find out who your target audience comprises in terms of professional and personal interests. Despite the solid experience you might have about the research area, the audience may not find interest in your topic if it is not adjacent to their scope of interest. Therefore, be cautious when coming up with the topic of your speech or presentation. If the type of your speech has to be structured in the form of a problem-solution paper, then make sure to identify the burning issue, investigate questions and opinions concerning it, and also identify the controversy behind the issue.

When thinking of which topic might be interested in writing about, ask yourself the following questions:

  • What would you like to talk about (here choose more than one option).
  • How do you think – will your potential audience like the topic of your choice? Explain your viewpoint.
  • How long do you plan to talk? Is your chosen topic sufficient for this type of presentation?
  • What are your personal opinions and biases regarding the problem?
  • Which topic are you most interested in? Which topic would be easy to talk about?
  • After you have explored the professional realms of your listeners, think of the most topical problems pertaining to the topic.
  • Think of whether you can provide personal experience examples or share your personal goals.

List of Speech Topics for Problem-Solution Presentation

Business area: work surroundings; career goals; bankruptcy; corporate ethics; abuse in marketing.

Teaching and education: peer pressure at school; cheating during exams; online learning versus classroom learning; education at home; sex education at school; internship opportunities.

Environmental aspects: climate change; global warming; alternative sources of energy; depletion of natural resources.

Nourishment and health: food labeling; diets and how to maintain healthy eating; problems of mentally ill people; health care in third-world countries; being vegetarian.

Politics and global issues: spying; international threats; problems with overpopulation.

Legislation and issues in the court of law: punishment for child molesters; drunk driving; frequency of juvenile aggression and delinquency; immigration and fence borders; tax incentives on church property.

Social problems: dealing with the homeless; sexual abuse; domestic violence; the effect of divorce on families; peer pressure; bullying; self-esteem; wage levels; teen drinking; gambling; discrimination on racial, ethnic, and gender backgrounds.

So far, you have a brief list of possible problem-solving essay topics. You may choose some of them for discussion or maybe they will inspire you to choose some other topic to reflect on. To properly develop the topics, make sure to examine them more closely and find some adjacent areas to them. Also thoroughly examine the dimensions of each topic investigation.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • What aspects of the problem have already been researched? Why have some been omitted?
  • How could one describe the existing obstacles to solving the problem?
  • How long does the problem persist?
  • What are the costs needed for problem-solving?
  • Will the problem aggravate if no measures are taken?
  • Should the problem be immediately addressed?
  • Has your target audience in particular been affected by your selected problem? In what way?
  • What supporting evidence could you provide to emphasize the importance of the problem?
  • What argumentation can you provide to demonstrate that your solutions are right and worth attention?
  • What facts/ figures/ supporting evidence could help the target audience understand the issue more comprehensively?

Working on the Solution

  • Write down all potential and alternative solutions. Keep in mind various aspects, merits, and features that could convince the audience to accept your standpoint. Investigate figures and facts; provide illustrations and real-life examples as support for your solutions. Do it consistently, step-by-step for each of the proposed solutions.
  • Choose the most important and effective solution to the existing problem. Pinpoint to how your solution plan can be applied in practice. Refer to outside sources; cite credible sources; consult sources written by experts in their field of study.
  • Devise a step-by-step implementation plan for each of the suggested solutions. Recommend specific procedures. Investigate the cost, effect, and necessary actions.
  • Call to action; time and place.
  • Other required constituents for the implementation of the plan.

If your listeners comprise people from different educational backgrounds or various professional spheres, then the decisive factor for choosing the topic should lie in choosing the topic that is most topical for the majority. Another option is to come up with a topic that presumably meets the needs of the bulk of the audience. If all of your listeners are well aware of the problem, then pay more attention to the fact of how much the topic is workable and reasonable. If you want to provide counter-arguments for the change policy campaign, then focus on the probable limitations and drawbacks of the policy.

How to Provide an Outline for a Problem Solution Speech

Below you will find the most appropriate methods for developing problem-solution topics:

  • Problem Solution Method

This strategy is advisable if you have chosen a contemporary social problem and have to convince the audience that your solution is the best one among those that have been previously provided. As such, provide a proper introduction where you entail sufficient background information in order to pinpoint the problem’s significance. Afterward, list the most appropriate situations and conditions that might serve as supporting evidence for justifying your position. Present a clearly defined plan for solving the problem.

  • Problem Cause Solution Method

This strategy is the most appropriate for solution topics. Here you need to single out the problem and investigate its causes. Further, you have to provide a critical analysis of the causes and put forward adequate solutions.

  • Problem Cause-Effect Method

This strategy comes in handy when outlining the aftermath of your problem-cause topic.

  • Comparative Advantage Method

You need to compare and contrast the identified solutions to the problem outlined.

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Maze Problem Solution Speech Topics

When working with problem solution speech topics there are two main objectives to consider:

  • to articulate clearly a particular problem, and
  • to present convincing solutions.

The requirement to fix the problem defines the problem-solution speech as a persuasive presentation. You may consider any of the persuasive speech topics that you have a proposal or a plan as a question for a problem-solution speech.

Selecting Problems

Deciding on what problem or issue you want to discuss may depend on the type of audience you'll be addressing.

If they comprise people from a particular profession, industry or social group, then it's quite natural to select an issue from their field. The audience might even have selected your topic for you beforehand.

For a generic audience, matters of public interest are a good place to pick subjects, such as national challenges, community crime, environmental concerns or personal finances.

Problem Solution Speech Topics

Another method is to ask the event facilitator ahead of time to get ideas from the audience as to issues they might want you to discuss. This way you'll be addressing concerns specific to the audience.

A slightly more complex approach is taking a generally accepted issue, proposing a contrary view and presenting alternative viewpoints.

For example, 'beer is healthy for you' or that 'animal-derived clothing textiles are better for the environment than synthetics'. This can only be pulled off if you are very well versed in the matter, have strong supporting evidence and fairly good speaking skills because you'll be a minority in the face of a majority audience with opposing opinions.

Whatever method you use to select your problem topic ensure that you have clear examples, convincing facts or credible data that supports your position on the matter.

Finding Solutions

The alternatives that you offer should be practical and applicable. Remember that as you are explaining the solution, your listeners will be thinking to themselves how possible it is to apply what you are saying.

Therefore, relating real life solutions, using various props and incorporating valid statistics can be really useful in supporting your argument.

Keep in mind how acquainted the audience is with the topic. If they are experts in the field, they will be expecting you to present novel ideas or innovative solutions that are over and above the standard procedures.

Handling Multiple-Aspect Problem Solution Speech Topics

Idea Problem Solution Speech Topics

When discussing several problems in one speech, organize your speech such that you present a solution after each problem you mention. This way the audience follows your argument well and doesn't get muddled about which answer is for what problem.

Problem solution speech topics can also include the causes of the problem before you give the solutions. Identifying the underlying causes help support your explanation and gives your solution more credibility.

Additionally, your personal opinion on the matter should be in line with the solutions you are presenting because your passion for the topic will come through in the delivery.

If you have bought into the solution, then your speech will be more persuasive and you will be in a better position to swing the audience to your viewpoint.

At the conclusion of the speech, summarize the issues, especially the solutions, as this is what you want your audience to remember best.

If you are having to work on problem solution speech topics in a classroom environment then you were probably given the subject you are to talk on. Keep everything above in mind when you write your speech up and you'll do great!

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Chapter 3: Preparing for Your First Speech

Patterns of Organization: Persuasive Speeches

Cause/effect pattern.

If the specific purpose mentions words such as “causes,” “origins,” “roots of,” “foundations,” “basis,” “grounds,” or “source,” it is a causal order; if it mentions words such as “effects,” “results,” “outcomes,” “consequences,” or “products,” it is effect order. If it mentions both, it would of course be cause/effect order. This example shows a cause/effect pattern:

Specific Purpose: To explain to my classmates the causes and effects of schizophrenia.

I.          Schizophrenia has genetic, social, and environmental causes.

II.       Schizophrenia has educational, relational, and medical effects. It should be noted, however, that a specific purpose like this example is very broad and probably not practical for your class speeches; it would be better to focus on just causes or effects, or even just one type of cause

(such as genetic causes of schizophrenia) or one type of effect (relational or social). These two examples show a speech that deals with causes only and effects only, respectively.

Specific Purpose: To explain to my fellow Biology 1107 students the origin of the Ebola epidemic in Africa in 2014.

I.          The outbreak began in March 2014 in Guinea with the death of one-year-old child who played in a tree with infected bats.

II.       The virus next spread to Sierra Leone and Liberia.

III.    In Fall of 2014 it spread to the U.S. and Europe by travelers from Liberia.

Specific Purpose: To describe to my classmates the effects of a diagnosis of autism on a child’s life.

I.         An autism diagnosis will affect the child’s educational plan.

II.      An autism diagnosis will affect the child’s social existence.

III.   An autism diagnosis will affect the child’s family relationships.

Problem-Solution Pattern

The problem-solution pattern will be explored in more depth in the chapter on Persuasive Speaking because that is where it is used the most. Then, we will see that there are variations on it. The principle behind problem-solution pattern is that if you explain a problem to an audience, you should not leave them hanging without solutions. Problems are discussed for understanding and to do something about them.

Additionally, when you want to persuade someone to act, the first reason is usually that something is wrong! Even if you wanted your friends to go out to get some dinner, and they have recently eaten, you will probably be less successful because there is no problem for them—they are not hungry. Then you would have to come up with a new problem, such as you will miss their presence, which they may or may not see as a problem for them.

In another real-life example, let’s say you want the members of the school board to provide more funds for music at the three local high schools in your county. What is missing because music or arts are not funded? What is the problem ?

Specific Purpose: To persuade the members of the school board to take action to support the music program at the school.

I.          There is a problem with eliminating extracurricular music pro- grams in high schools.

A.         Students who do not have extracurricular music in their lives have lower SAT scores.

B.        Schools that do not have extracurricular music programs have more gang violence and juvenile delinquency.

II.       The solution is to provide $200,000 in the budget to sustain extra- curricular music in our high schools.

A.        $120,000 would go to bands.

B.        $80,000 would go to choral programs.

Of course, this is a simple outline and you would need to provide evidence to support the arguments, but it shows how problem-solution works.

Psychologically, it makes more sense to use problem-solution rather than solution-problem. The audience will be more motivated to listen if you address needs, deficiencies, or problems in their lives rather than giving them solutions first.

Problem-Cause-Solution Pattern

A variation of the problem-solution pattern, and one that sometimes re- quires more in-depth exploration of an issue, is the “problem-cause-solution” pattern. If you were giving a speech on future extinction of certain animal species, it would be insufficient to just explain that numbers of species are about to become extinct. Your second point would logically have to explain the cause behind this happening. Is it due to climate change, some type of pollution, encroachment on habitats, disease, or some other rea- son? In many cases, you can’t really solve a problem without first identify- ing what caused the problem. This is similar to the organizational pattern called Monroe’s Motivated Sequence (German, Gronbeck, Ehninger & Monroe, 2012), which will be fully explained in Chapter 13. The Mon-

roe’s Motivated Sequence requires a discussion of cause to create a logical speech.

Specific Purpose: To persuade my audience that the age to obtain a driver’s license in the state of Georgia should be raised to 18.

I.          There is a problem in this country with young drivers getting into serious automobile accidents leading to many preventable deaths.

II.       One of the primary causes of this is younger drivers’ inability to remain focused and make good decisions due to incomplete brain development.

III.    One solution that will help reduce the number of young drivers involved in accidents would be to raise the age for obtaining a driver’s license to 18.

Some Additional Principles of Organization

It is possible that you may use more than one of these organizational pat- terns within a single speech. For example, the main points of your speech could be one organizational pattern and the subpoints a different one. In the spatial example above about the Native American nations of Georgia, the subpoints might be chronological (emphasizing their development over time), or they could be topical (explaining aspects of their culture).

You should also note that in all of the examples to this point (which have been kept simple for the purpose of explanation), each main point is relatively equal in emphasis; therefore, the time spent on each should be equal as well. While you are not obliged to spend exactly the same amount of time on each main point, the time spent (and the importance of the main point) should be about the same. You would not want your first Main Point to be 30 seconds long, the second one to be 90 seconds, and the third 3 minutes. For example:

Specific Purpose: To explain to my classmates the rules of baseball.

I.          Baseball has rules about equipment.

II.       Baseball has rules about numbers of players.

III.    Baseball has rules about play.

Main Point II is not really equal in importance to the other two. There is a great deal you could say about the equipment and even more about the rules of play, but the number of players would take you about ten seconds to say. If Main Point II were “Baseball has rules about the positions on the field,” that would make more sense and be closer in level of importance to the other two.

To give another example, let’s say you want to give a commemorative (or tribute) speech about a local veteran whom you admire.

I.          James Owens is an admirable person because he earned the Silver Star in the Korean War.

II.       James Owens is an admirable person because he served our com- munity as a councilman for 25 years.

III.    James Owens is an admirable person because he rescued five pup- pies that were abandoned in his backyard.

Although Main Point III is a good thing to do, it’s really not equal to Main Points I and II in importance or in the amount of time you would need to spend on it.

Earlier in the chapter, we said that organizing a speech involves grouping, labeling, and ordering. Let’s address labeling here . You will also notice that in most of the examples so far, the main points are phrased using a similar sentence structure. For example, “The first chamber in the blood flow is…” “The second chamber in the blood flow is…” This simple repetition of sentence structure is called parallelism , a technique useful for speakers and helpful for the audience in remembering information. It is not absolutely necessary to use it and will not always be relevant, but par- allelism should be used when appropriate and effective.

In relation to the way each main point is written, notice that they are full grammatical sentences, although sometimes short and simple. For purposes of preparation, this is a good habit, and your instructor will probably require you to write your main points in full sentences. Your instructor may also expect you to write your subpoints in complete sentences as well, but he or she will discuss that with you.

Finally, in the way you phrase the main points, be sure they are adequate labeled and clearly explain your content. Students are often tempted to write main points as directions to themselves, “Talking about the health department” or “Mention the solution.” This is not helpful for you, nor will your instructor be able to tell what you mean by those phrases. “The health department provides many services for low-income residents” says something we can all understand.

We have included examples of outlines at the ends of chapters 12, 13, and We have tried to give examples of different kinds of formats, but individual instructors prefer specific format for outlines. Your instructor should give you examples of how they want the outline to be developed and for- matted, and you should follow their directions.

Fundamentals of Public Speaking Copyright © by Lumen Learning is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Module 10: Persuasive Speaking

Structure of a persuasive speech, learning objectives.

Identify characteristic structures of a persuasive speech.

In many ways, a persuasive speech is structured like an informative speech. It has an introduction with an attention-getter and a clear thesis statement. It also has a body where the speaker presents their main points and it ends with a conclusion that sums up the main point of the speech.

The biggest difference is that the primary purpose of an informative speech is to explain whereas the primary purpose of a persuasive speech is to advocate the audience adopt a point of view or take a course of action. A persuasive speech, in other words, is an argument  supported by well-thought-out reasons and relevant, appropriate, and credible supporting evidence.

We can classify persuasive speeches into three broad categories:

  • The widely used pesticide Atrazine is extremely harmful to amphibians.
  • All house-cats should  be kept indoors to protect the songbird population.
  • Offshore tax havens, while legal, are immoral and unpatriotic .

The organizational pattern we select and the type of supporting material we use should support the overall argument we are making.

The informative speech organizational patterns we covered earlier can work for a persuasive speech as well. In addition, the following organization patterns are especially suited to persuasive speeches (these are covered in more detail in Module 6: Organizing and Outlining Your Speech):

  • Causal : Also known as cause-effect, the causal pattern describes some cause and then identifies what effects resulted from the cause. This can be a useful pattern to use when you are speaking about the positive or negative consequences of taking a particular action.
  • Problem-solution : With this organizational pattern, you provide two main points. The first main point focuses on a problem that exists and the second details your proposed solution to the problem. This is an especially good organization pattern for speeches arguing for policy changes.
  • Problem-cause-solution: This is a variation of the problem-solution organizational pattern. A three-step organizational pattern where the speaker starts by explaining the problem, then explains the causes of the problem, and lastly proposes a solution to the problem.
  • Comparative advantage : A speaker compares two or more things or ideas and explains why one of the things or ideas has more advantages or is better than the other.
  • Monroe’s motivated sequence : An organizational pattern that is a more elaborate variation of the problem-cause-solution pattern.  We’ll go into more depth on Monroe’s motivated sequence on the next page.
  • Structure of a Persuasive Speech. Authored by : Mike Randolph with Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution

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Problem solution persuasive speech topics, rachel r.n..

  • September 10, 2022
  • Essay Topics and Ideas

When you are asked to speak about a problem and a solution, it can be difficult to decide on what topic to choose. In this article, we have compiled a list of problem solution persuasive speech topics to help you choose the perfect one for you.

What You'll Learn

Thirty Problem Solution Persuasive Speech Topics

1. Ending world hunger 2. Achieving world peace 3. Curing cancer 4. Eradicating poverty 5. solving the energy crisis 6. combating global warming 7. providing healthcare for all 8. eliminating illiteracy 9. making college education affordable for all 10. cleaning up the environment11. stopping child labor 12. improving public transportation 13. protecting endangered species 14. curbing gang violence 15. banning smoking in public places 16. stricter penalties for drunk driving 17. increasing funding for the arts 18. decreasing the number of abortions 19. legalizing gay marriage 20. Teaching effective financial planning in schools 21. Promoting healthy eating habits in schools 22. Encouraging more physical activity in schools 23. Making driver’s education mandatory in high school 24. Lowering the drinking age to 18 25. Requiring all students to take a foreign language in high school 26. Reinforcing basic skills in elementary and middle school 27. Offering free universal preschool 28. Vouchers for private/religious schools 29. Building more charter schools 30. Homeschooling

Thirty Problem Solution Persuasive Speech Ideas

If you’re looking for some problem solution persuasive speech ideas, then you’ve come to the right place. Below are thirty different prompts that can help you get started on your next speech.

1. The world’s ever-growing population and the consequent demand for resources. 2.How to prevent human trafficking? 3. What can be done to stop cyber bullying? 4. How can we get more people to vote in elections? 5. Should the legal drinking age be raised or lowered? 6. Are beauty pageants harmful? 7. Should the use of animals for testing be banned? 8. Should schools require students to wear uniforms? 9. Is too much emphasis placed on standardized test scores? 10. Are zoos cruel to animals? 11. How can we reduce poverty around the world? 12. Should wealthy nations be required to share their resources with poorer ones? 13. Is it fair that some countries have free healthcare while others do not? 14. How can we provide clean water for everyone in the world? 15. Should genetically modified foods be banned? 16. How can we reduce our reliance on fossil fuels?

Thirty Problem Solution Persuasive Speech topic examples

When you are assigned a problem solution persuasive speech, it is important to choose a good topic. Below are thirty problem solution persuasive speech topics to help you get started.

1. The problems with plastic surgery and how to fix them. 2. The rise of eating disorders and what can be done about it. 3. Why there needs to be more education on mental health and how to prevent suicide. 4. The ongoing issue of gun violence and what can be done to stop it. 5. Racism in America and how to fix the divide between races. 6. The wage gap between men and women and how to close it. 7. How the media needs to change the way they present images of beauty to young girls and boys. 8. The problem of child labor and what can be done about it globally. 9. Why there should be more focus on renewable energy sources and less on fossil fuels. 10. What can be done about the increasing number of homeless people in cities?

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8.3: Organizational Styles

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  • Joshua Trey Barnett@Indiana University
  • Millersville University via Public Speaking Project

After deciding which main points and sub-points you must include, you can get to work writing up the speech. Before you do so, however, it is helpful to consider how you will organize the ideas. From presenting historical information in chronological order as part of an informative speech to drawing a comparison between two ideas in a persuasive speech to offering up problems and solutions, there are many ways in which speakers can craft effective speeches. These are referred to as organizational styles, or templates for organizing the main points of a speech.

Screen Shot 2019-07-05 at 3.09.37 PM.png

Chronological

When you speak about events that are linked together by time, it is sensible to engage the chronological organization style. In a chronological speech , main points are delivered according to when they happened and could be traced on a calendar or clock. Arranging main points in chronological order can be helpful when describing historical events to an audience as well as when the order of events is necessary to understand what you wish to convey. Informative speeches about a series of events most commonly engage the chronological style, as do many demonstrative speeches (e.g., how to bake a cake or build an airplane). Another time when the chronological style makes sense is when you tell the story of someone’s life or career. For instance, a speech about Oprah Winfrey might be arranged chronologically (see textbox). In this case, the main points are arranged by following Winfrey’s life from birth to the present time. Life events (e.g., birth, her early career, her life after ending the Oprah Winfrey Show) are connected together according to when they happened and highlight the progression of Winfrey’s career. Organizing the speech in this way illustrates the interconnectedness of life events.

Doing the best at this moment puts you in the best place for the next moment. ~ Oprah Winfrey

When the main points of your speech center on ideas that are more distinct from one another, a topical organization style may be engaged. In a topical speech , main points are developed separately and are generally connected together within the introduction and conclusion. In other words, the topical style is crafted around main points and sub-points that are mutually exclusive but related to one another by virtue of the thesis. It makes sense to use the topical style when elements are connected to one another because of their relationship to the whole. A topical speech about the composition of a newspaper company can be seen in the following textbox. The main points are linked together by the fact that they are all a part of the same business. Although they are related in that way, the topical style illustrates the ways in which the four different departments function apart from one another. In this example, the topical style is a good fit because the four departments are equally important to the function of the newspaper company.

Screen Shot 2019-07-05 at 3.15.05 PM.png

Another way to organize the points of a speech is through a spatial speech , which arranges main points according to their physical and geographic relationships. The spatial style is an especially useful organization style when the main point’s importance is derived from its location or directional focus. In other words, when the scene or the composition is a central aspect of the main points, the spatial style is an appropriate way to deliver key ideas. Things can be described from top to bottom, inside to outside, left to right, north to south, and so on. Importantly, speakers using a spatial style should offer commentary about the placement of the main points as they move through the speech, alerting audience members to the location changes. For instance, a speech about The University of Georgia might be arranged spatially; in this example, the spatial organization frames the discussion in terms of the campus layout. The spatial style is fitting since the differences in architecture and uses of space are related to particular geographic areas, making location a central organizing factor. As such, the spatial style highlights these location differences.

comparative

When you need to discuss the similarities and differences between two or more things, a comparative organizational pattern can be employed. In comparative speeches, speakers may choose to compare things a couple different ways. First, you could compare two or more things as whole (e.g., discuss all traits of an apple and then all traits of an orange). Second, you could compare these things element by element (e.g., color of each, smell of each, AND taste of each). Some topics that are routinely spoken about comparatively include different cultures, different types of transportation, and even different types of coffee. A comparative speech outline about eastern and western cultures could look like this.

In this type of speech, the list of comparisons, which should be substantiated with further evidence, could go on for any number of main points. The speech could also compare how two or more things are more alike than one might think. For instance, a speaker could discuss how singers Madonna and Lady Gaga share many similarities both in aesthetic style and in their music.

Screen Shot 2019-07-05 at 3.32.32 PM.png

problem-solution

Sometimes it is necessary to share a problem and a solution with an audience. In cases like these, the problem-solution speech is an appropriate way to arrange the main points of a speech. One familiar example of speeches organized in this way is the political speeches that presidential hopefuls give in the United States. Often, candidates will begin their speech by describing a problem created by or, at the very least, left unresolved by the incumbent. Once they have established their view of the problem, they then go on to flesh out their proposed solution. The problem- solution style is especially useful when the speaker wants to convince the audience that they should take action in solving some problem. A political candidate seeking office might frame a speech using the problem-solution style (sse texbox).

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world's problems. ~ Mahatma Gandhi

This example illustrates the way in which a problem-solution oriented speech can be used to identify both a general problem (energy crisis) and a specific problem (incumbent’s lack of action). Moreover, this example highlights two kinds of solutions: a general solution and a solution that is dependent on the speaker’s involvement. The problem-solution speech is especially appropriate when the speaker desires to promote a particular solution as this offers audience members a way to become involved. Whether you are able to offer a specific solution or not, key to the problem-solution speech is a clear description of both the problem and the solution with clear links drawn between the two. In other words, the speech should make specific connections between the problem and how the solution can be engaged to solve it.

Screen Shot 2019-07-05 at 3.39.34 PM.png

Similar to a problem-solution speech, a causal speech informs audience members about causes and effects that have already happened. In other words, a causal organization style first addresses some cause and then shares what effects resulted. A causal speech can be particularly effective when the speaker wants to share the relationship between two things, like the creation of a vaccine to help deter disease. An example of how a causal speech about a shingles vaccine might be designed follows:

As the example illustrates, the basic components of the causal speech are the cause and the effect. Such an organizational style is useful when a speaker needs to share the results of a new program, discuss how one act led to another, or discuss the positive/negative outcomes of taking some action.

Every choice you make has an end result.~ Zig Ziglar

Choosing an organizational style is an important step in the speechwriting process. As you formulate the purpose of your speech and generate the main points that you will need to include, selecting an appropriate organizational style will likely become easier. The topical, spatial, causal, comparative and chronological methods of arrangement may be better suited to informative speeches, whereas the refutation pattern may work well for a persuasive speech. Additionally, Chapter 16 offers additional organization styles suited for persuasive speeches, such as the refutation speech and Monroe’s Motivated Sequence (Monroe, 1949). Next, we will look at statements that help tie all of your points together and the formal mode of organizing a speech by using outlines.

Screen Shot 2019-07-05 at 3.42.25 PM.png

problem solution in speech

17.3 Organizing Persuasive Speeches

Learning objectives.

  • Understand three common organizational patterns for persuasive speeches.
  • Explain the steps utilized in Monroe’s motivated sequence.
  • Explain the parts of a problem-cause-solution speech.
  • Explain the process utilized in a comparative advantage persuasive speech.

Previously in this text we discussed general guidelines for organizing speeches. In this section, we are going to look at three organizational patterns ideally suited for persuasive speeches: Monroe’s motivated sequence, problem-cause-solution, and comparative advantages.

Monroe’s Motivated Sequence

One of the most commonly cited and discussed organizational patterns for persuasive speeches is Alan H. Monroe’s motivated sequence. The purpose of Monroe’s motivated sequence is to help speakers “sequence supporting materials and motivational appeals to form a useful organizational pattern for speeches as a whole.” German, K. M., Gronbeck, B. E., Ehninger, D., & Monroe, A. H. (2010). Principles of public speaking (17th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon, p. 236.

While Monroe’s motivated sequence is commonly discussed in most public speaking textbooks, we do want to provide one minor caution. Thus far, almost no research has been conducted that has demonstrated that Monroe’s motivated sequence is any more persuasive than other structural patterns. In the only study conducted experimentally examining Monroe’s motivated sequence, the researchers did not find the method more persuasive, but did note that audience members found the pattern more organized than other methods. Micciche, T., Pryor, B., & Butler, J. (2000). A test of Monroe’s motivated sequence for its effects on ratings of message organization and attitude change. Psychological Reports, 86 , 1135–1138. We wanted to add this sidenote because we don’t want you to think that Monroe’s motivated sequence is a kind of magic persuasive bullet; the research simply doesn’t support this notion. At the same time, research does support that organized messages are perceived as more persuasive as a whole, so using Monroe’s motivated sequence to think through one’s persuasive argument could still be very beneficial.

Table 17.1 "Monroe’s Motivated Sequence" lists the basic steps of Monroe’s motivated sequence and the subsequent reaction a speaker desires from his or her audience.

Table 17.1 Monroe’s Motivated Sequence

The first step in Monroe’s motivated sequence is the attention step First step in Monroe’s motivated sequence where a speaker attempts to get his or her audience’s attention. , in which a speaker attempts to get the audience’s attention. To gain an audience’s attention, we recommend that you think through three specific parts of the attention step. First, you need to have a strong attention-getting device. As previously discussed in Chapter 9 "Introductions Matter: How to Begin a Speech Effectively" , a strong attention getter at the beginning of your speech is very important. Second, you need to make sure you introduce your topic clearly. If your audience doesn’t know what your topic is quickly, they are more likely to stop listening. Lastly, you need to explain to your audience why they should care about your topic.

In the need step Second step in Monroe’s motivated sequence where a speaker establishes that there is a specific need or problem. of Monroe’s motivated sequence, the speaker establishes that there is a specific need or problem. In Monroe’s conceptualization of need, he talks about four specific parts of the need: statement, illustration, ramification, and pointing. First, a speaker needs to give a clear and concise statement of the problem. This part of a speech should be crystal clear for an audience. Second, the speaker needs to provide one or more examples to illustrate the need. The illustration is an attempt to make the problem concrete for the audience. Next, a speaker needs to provide some kind of evidence (e.g., statistics, examples, testimony) that shows the ramifications or consequences of the problem. Lastly, a speaker needs to point to the audience and show exactly how the problem relates to them personally.

Satisfaction

In the third step of Monroe’s motivated sequence, the satisfaction step Third step in Monroe’s motivated sequence where a speaker sets out to satisfy the need or solve the problem. , the speaker sets out to satisfy the need or solve the problem. Within this step, Monroe (1935) proposed a five-step plan for satisfying a need:

  • Explanation
  • Theoretical demonstration
  • Reference to practical experience
  • Meeting objections

First, you need to clearly state the attitude, value, belief, or action you want your audience to accept. The purpose of this statement is to clearly tell your audience what your ultimate goal is.

Second, you want to make sure that you clearly explain to your audience why they should accept the attitude, value, belief, or action you proposed. Just telling your audience they should do something isn’t strong enough to actually get them to change. Instead, you really need to provide a solid argument for why they should accept your proposed solution.

Third, you need to show how the solution you have proposed meets the need or problem. Monroe calls this link between your solution and the need a theoretical demonstration because you cannot prove that your solution will work. Instead, you theorize based on research and good judgment that your solution will meet the need or solve the problem.

Fourth, to help with this theoretical demonstration, you need to reference practical experience, which should include examples demonstrating that your proposal has worked elsewhere. Research, statistics, and expert testimony are all great ways of referencing practical experience.

Lastly, Monroe recommends that a speaker respond to possible objections. As a persuasive speaker, one of your jobs is to think through your speech and see what counterarguments could be made against your speech and then rebut those arguments within your speech. When you offer rebuttals for arguments against your speech, it shows your audience that you’ve done your homework and educated yourself about multiple sides of the issue.

Visualization

The next step of Monroe’s motivated sequence is the visualization step Fourth step in Monroe’s motivated sequence where a speaker asks his or her audience to visualize a future where the need has been met or the problem solved. , in which you ask the audience to visualize a future where the need has been met or the problem solved. In essence, the visualization stage is where a speaker can show the audience why accepting a specific attitude, value, belief, or behavior can positively affect the future. When helping people to picture the future, the more concrete your visualization is, the easier it will be for your audience to see the possible future and be persuaded by it. You also need to make sure that you clearly show how accepting your solution will directly benefit your audience.

According to Monroe, visualization can be conducted in one of three ways: positive, negative, or contrast. Monroe, A. H. (1935). Principles and types of speech . Chicago, IL: Scott Foresman. The positive method of visualization is where a speaker shows how adopting a proposal leads to a better future (e.g., recycle, and we’ll have a cleaner and safer planet). Conversely, the negative method of visualization is where a speaker shows how not adopting the proposal will lead to a worse future (e.g., don’t recycle, and our world will become polluted and uninhabitable). Monroe also acknowledged that visualization can include a combination of both positive and negative visualization. In essence, you show your audience both possible outcomes and have them decide which one they would rather have.

The final step in Monroe’s motivated sequence is the action step Fifth step in Monroe’s motivated sequence where a speaker asks for an audience to approve the speaker’s proposal. , in which a speaker asks an audience to approve the speaker’s proposal. For understanding purposes, we break action into two distinct parts: audience action and approval. Audience action refers to direct physical behaviors a speaker wants from an audience (e.g., flossing their teeth twice a day, signing a petition, wearing seat belts). Approval, on the other hand, involves an audience’s consent or agreement with a speaker’s proposed attitude, value, or belief.

When preparing an action step, it is important to make sure that the action, whether audience action or approval, is realistic for your audience. Asking your peers in a college classroom to donate one thousand dollars to charity isn’t realistic. Asking your peers to donate one dollar is considerably more realistic. In a persuasive speech based on Monroe’s motivated sequence, the action step will end with the speech’s concluding device. As discussed elsewhere in this text, you need to make sure that you conclude in a vivid way so that the speech ends on a high point and the audience has a sense of energy as well as a sense of closure.

Now that we’ve walked through Monroe’s motivated sequence, let’s look at how you could use Monroe’s motivated sequence to outline a persuasive speech:

Specific Purpose: To persuade my classroom peers that the United States should have stronger laws governing the use of for-profit medical experiments.

Main Points:

  • Attention: Want to make nine thousand dollars for just three weeks of work lying around and not doing much? Then be a human guinea pig. Admittedly, you’ll have to have a tube down your throat most of those three weeks, but you’ll earn three thousand dollars a week.
  • Need: Every day many uneducated and lower socioeconomic-status citizens are preyed on by medical and pharmaceutical companies for use in for-profit medical and drug experiments. Do you want one of your family members to fall prey to this evil scheme?
  • Satisfaction: The United States should have stronger laws governing the use of for-profit medical experiments to ensure that uneducated and lower-socioeconomic-status citizens are protected.
  • Visualization: If we enact tougher experiment oversight, we can ensure that medical and pharmaceutical research is conducted in a way that adheres to basic values of American decency. If we do not enact tougher experiment oversight, we could find ourselves in a world where the lines between research subject, guinea pig, and patient become increasingly blurred.
  • Action: In order to prevent the atrocities associated with for-profit medical and pharmaceutical experiments, please sign this petition asking the US Department of Health and Human Services to pass stricter regulations on this preying industry that is out of control.

This example shows how you can take a basic speech topic and use Monroe’s motivated sequence to clearly and easily outline your speech efficiently and effectively.

Table 17.2 "Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Checklist" also contains a simple checklist to help you make sure you hit all the important components of Monroe’s motivated sequence.

Table 17.2 Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Checklist

Problem-Cause-Solution

Another format for organizing a persuasive speech is the problem-cause-solution format. In this specific format, you discuss what a problem is, what you believe is causing the problem, and then what the solution should be to correct the problem.

Specific Purpose: To persuade my classroom peers that our campus should adopt a zero-tolerance policy for hate speech.

  • Demonstrate that there is distrust among different groups on campus that has led to unnecessary confrontations and violence.
  • Show that the confrontations and violence are a result of hate speech that occurred prior to the events.
  • Explain how instituting a campus-wide zero-tolerance policy against hate speech could stop the unnecessary confrontations and violence.

In this speech, you want to persuade people to support a new campus-wide policy calling for zero-tolerance of hate speech. Once you have shown the problem, you then explain to your audience that the cause of the unnecessary confrontations and violence is prior incidents of hate speech. Lastly, you argue that a campus-wide zero-tolerance policy could help prevent future unnecessary confrontations and violence. Again, this method of organizing a speech is as simple as its name: problem-cause-solution.

Comparative Advantages

The final method for organizing a persuasive speech is called the comparative advantages speech format. The goal of this speech is to compare items side-by-side and show why one of them is more advantageous than the other. For example, let’s say that you’re giving a speech on which e-book reader is better: Amazon.com’s Kindle or Barnes and Nobles’ Nook. Here’s how you could organize this speech:

Specific Purpose: To persuade my audience that the Nook is more advantageous than the Kindle.

  • The Nook allows owners to trade and loan books to other owners or people who have downloaded the Nook software, while the Kindle does not.
  • The Nook has a color-touch screen, while the Kindle’s screen is black and grey and noninteractive.
  • The Nook’s memory can be expanded through microSD, while the Kindle’s memory cannot be upgraded.

As you can see from this speech’s organization, the simple goal of this speech is to show why one thing has more positives than something else. Obviously, when you are demonstrating comparative advantages, the items you are comparing need to be functional equivalents—or, as the saying goes, you cannot compare apples to oranges.

Key Takeaways

  • There are three common patterns that persuaders can utilize to help organize their speeches effectively: Monroe’s motivated sequence, problem-cause-solution, and comparative advantage. Each of these patterns can effectively help a speaker think through his or her thoughts and organize them in a manner that will be more likely to persuade an audience.
  • Alan H. Monroe’s (1935) motivated sequence is a commonly used speech format that is used by many people to effectively organize persuasive messages. The pattern consists of five basic stages: attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action. In the first stage, a speaker gets an audience’s attention. In the second stage, the speaker shows an audience that a need exists. In the third stage, the speaker shows how his or her persuasive proposal could satisfy the need. The fourth stage shows how the future could be if the persuasive proposal is or is not adopted. Lastly, the speaker urges the audience to take some kind of action to help enact the speaker’s persuasive proposal.
  • The problem-cause-solution proposal is a three-pronged speech pattern. The speaker starts by explaining the problem the speaker sees. The speaker then explains what he or she sees as the underlying causes of the problem. Lastly, the speaker proposes a solution to the problem that corrects the underlying causes.
  • The comparative advantages speech format is utilized when a speaker is comparing two or more things or ideas and shows why one of the things or ideas has more advantages than the other(s).
  • Create a speech using Monroe’s motivated sequence to persuade people to recycle.
  • Create a speech using the problem-cause-solution method for a problem you see on your college or university campus.
  • Create a comparative advantages speech comparing two brands of toothpaste.

253 Easy Problem Solution Speech Topics for 2024

Well, here’s the good news: those pesky problem and solution essays can be way better. All you need is an easy topic.

Primary steps in Problem Solving.

Here’s even better news: we’ve already compiled a list of 253 simple problem solution speech and essay topics for you.

  • 🎓 Topics for College Students
  • 🗣 Speech Topics
  • 📝 Essay Topics
  • 💊 Solutions

✅ Problem Solution Speech Examples

📍 problem-solution speech topics 2024.

  • How to deal with school bullying?
  • Air pollution: sources, effects, and prevention measures.
  • What are the efficient ways of dealing with cyberbullying?
  • Google’s corporate strategy, problems, and solutions.
  • Better education for special needs children.
  • What measures can be implemented to tame the problem of homelessness?
  • How to incorporate healthy eating habits into your daily routine?
  • How to improve teacher’s performance and development?
  • Steps to improve healthcare organizations.
  • Best methods to educate the public about the most common health issues.
  • Ways to improve communication between schools and the community .
  • How can child obesity in the United States be solved?
  • How can lean project management improve developmental activities?
  • Climate change: impact and possible solutions .
  • How to reduce drunk driving incidents to a minimum.

🔧 Problem-Solution Speech. Manual

You might be wondering what a problem-solution is?

If you have never heard of such a term before, it should still be pretty straightforward that it deals with solving problems.

This article is created specifically for people who need a little extra inspiration and guidance in creating a problem solution speech or essay.

We will start with an overview of several vital aspects. 👇

Challenges of Problem Solution Speech Topics

What do we have to deal with when talking about problem solution topics in the first place?

  • Problem-solution scenario appears to play an essential role in the modern world. It finds application in various areas of our lives, especially in business, education, and government-related fields.
  • It is more than just sharing the view. The main aim of any problem-solution speech is to encourage the audience to take some action or support a particular idea.

Turn off the tap while brushing your teeth!

  • Defining the problem clearly. You should gather enough evidence to prove that the issue is quite severe and needs attendance immediately.
  • Everyone should be able to understand the details. Your speech needs to be comprehensive, and its central idea – easy to grasp.
  • Are people aware of your problem? Do they all realize its seriousness? There should be a short introduction if your target audience doesn’t understand the relevance of the topic.
  • Research your listeners. Your main goal is to gain audience support – be aware of all the biases they are susceptible to. Find counterarguments to their opposing arguments.
  • Creating convincing arguments. However, this issue should be discussed separately since every topic needs a personalized approach.
  • Don’t forget to use a reasonable tone and respect your audience. Being polite and open to criticism is essential for your reputation as a serious author.

Strategies for Creative Problem Solving

You already picked a problem?

Here are helpful solution options you need to know.

The most important thing is to make the solution practical and effective.

  • Suggest adding something to the existing problem . For example, many social and cultural issues would be resolved if they received additional funding or staff. The opposite approach might be as practical – removing the source of the problem. So, it’s not an issue anymore.
  • Creating and enforcing specific rules or laws. It might be applied in various areas, especially in the governmental field of work and education.
  • Educate and motivate people. Some of the main reasons for existing social and health problems are that people are not aware of what they should do or simply lack motivation. It appears to be the focus of campaigns against drugs, smoking, and alcohol.
  • Offer to make some changes in the method . It sometimes happens that a specific instrument does not work for everyone, so it should be changed. Another example is implementing successful marketing campaigns for various products.
  • Probably the current leadership and strategy do not work. In human resources, education, and any area that needs a problem solution, this strategy might be the most effective.

Changing the leadership King ->People.

Problem and Solution Text Structure

The structure of any problem-solution speech or presentation is relatively universal. Even though there are two main types of outline used, the components tend to stay the same.

You should always introduce the situation , helping your listeners understand the problem’s background. Then, you should define the issue itself , explaining its urgency and significance. After that, it is time to present your solution . In the end, there is usually a quick overview of the speech and a call for action .

Problem and Solution Structure.

The methods for outlining your problem solution speech are known for those who have experience in writing essays:

  • The block method divides your speech into sections according to the categories. That is, first, you state all problems you have to address. Then make a short transition paragraph. Only then explain the solutions for the issues you discussed previously.

Block Method structure of a problem-solution speech.

  • The chain method has the same main components but is different in structure. Each time you talk about a problem, you need to discuss a solution. Therefore, if you want to address three issues, there should be three parts of the main body solving each problem at a time.

Chain Method structure of a problem-solution speech.

🎓 Problem Solution Speech Topics for College Students

Now, let’s get to the examples of the most relevant issues of today:

  • How to prevent the increase in temperatures predicted to reach a dangerous point by the year 2100?
  • How poverty causes crime, and is there a way to deal with it?
  • What are the causes and possible solutions to India’s increasing death toll related to low air quality?
  • How to take China out of the risk of losing the economy’s growth in the next several decades?
  • How can the problem of posing education be solved?
  • Total factor productivity: the issues with evaluating India’s output that shows productivity growth.
  • Stagnating productivity as the cause of the unequal distribution of the world’s wealth. What are the solutions?
  • Green Construction as an answer to environmental challenges.
  • How to prevent the unemployment rates from increasing due to artificial intelligence development?
  • How to achieve team cohesion?
  • Technology as a threat to privacy and ways to deal with the problem?
  • Best ways to address the health needs of an aging population.
  • Webster University’s problems and solutions.
  • How to protect societies from health issues related to overeating and low physical activity?
  • The causes of air pollution and possible solutions.
  • Practical solutions for the rising demand for talented employees in the STEM areas and lack of candidates.
  • Is the driverless vehicle a solution to the high rates of death in the crushes on the roadways?
  • Architecture and urbanism: how can more ecological and equitable cities be built with the latest technologies?
  • How to improve your teamwork performance?
  • What are the ways to reduce the cases of domestic violence in our society?
  • Human genomes : how to avoid mistakes made while implementing any intelligence and lifespan enhancement tools?
  • What are the most effective strategies suitable for diagnosing, treating, and preventing drug-resistant infections from becoming a threat?
  • A step towards resolving financial issues facing U.S. higher education.
  • Global development: how should the latest technologies in health, education, and nutrition be distributed among societies?
  • Which strategies for dealing with epidemics and preparation methods can help prevent future global outbreaks?
  • Technical urban planning : how should it be improved so that developing cities can find better solutions to increased global carbon emissions?

🎤 Easy Problem Solution Speech Topics

Someone may find these issues trifling, but try to solve them 😊

  • How the lack of self-confidence affects your life and ways to deal with it.
  • The problem of fast fashion and ways to deal with it.
  • The problem of sexual assault and possible solutions.
  • Mental health problems: how can an open discussion be encouraged in our society?
  • The challenges of consumerism culture and ways to solve them.
  • Why do so many people face an existential crisis , and are there any ways to deal with the issue?
  • What are the right ways to resolve the ethical issue of advertising a harmful product?
  • How has texting affected face-to-face communication, and what are the possible solutions to the problem?
  • How can music prevent insomnia and improve your sleeping habits?
  • How informal organization creates problems for managers, and how can these issues be redressed?
  • Is including sex education in the program as a complete course can help to prevent early pregnancy?
  • Can becoming a volunteer solve the self-confidence problem?
  • Gender-specific bathrooms: what is a better way to prevent sexual assaults?
  • Excluding all the personal information details from the CV to reduce job market discrimination.
  • How does donating and recycling clothes help with the world poverty issue?
  • Student parking problem and ways to deal with it .
  • What are the best ways to reduce stress and anxiety?
  • Open discussions and effective communication at the workplace as the ultimate problem-solving approach .
  • Some universities are not as diverse as others. How can a college attract students from various backgrounds?
  • Social fatigue: how can spending some time alone help fight it?
  • Best ways to address various academic and learning challenges.
  • Educating couples about proper budgeting as the way to prevent money-related conflicts.
  • Reducing stress from social activity by planning daily routine.
  • Legalizing medical marijuana : issues and solutions.
  • The effect of social media on adolescents and possible interventions to limit the negative outcomes .
  • Why is implementing a vegetarian diet one of the best ways to fight obesity?
  • Psychological and physiological reasons why chewing gum helps with smoking addiction .
  • Risks of medical tourism and some possible solutions .
  • Consumption of a specific amount of red wine as a way to help with stomach ulcers.
  • Contradictory but effective solution: taking selfies to boost self-confidence .
  • How well does online video chatting help sustain an excellent long-distance relationship ?
  • How can online fundraising campaigns help even more people in need?
  • Do newspapers switching to online bases helps to reduce waste?
  • Paper and reusable bags as an easy way to help reduce plastic waste.
  • How strict should be water filtration rules to reduce water pollution?
  • Planting trees as a way to deal with deforestation.
  • Walking as the means of solving both pollution and health issues.
  • How to better prepare students for adult life in the USA.
  • How does setting up more drinking fountains help with reducing plastic pollution ?
  • What are the ways to increase attendance at sports events?

🍭 Problem Solution Persuasive Speech Topics

The persuasive approach is mainly different from the other with the tone of your speech. It needs to be encouraging and trustworthy enough so that your audience accepts your idea. In case you wonder what are the best problem solution persuasive speech topics, here are some examples:

  • How to get at least eight hours of sleep every day, and why is it an issue?
  • The strategies to stop the increased consumption of sugar that leads to obesity.
  • The problem of school counseling: why do Professional School Counselors Need to Pay Attention to Ethics?
  • The ways to avoid the negative influence of hate towards religions on societies.
  • How to introduce more gender-neutral concepts to the job market.
  • Teaching gender and equal rights at schools to help decrease gender-related social issues .
  • Paper recycling as a way to deal with environmental issues.
  • Internships for all college students as the solution to high unemployment rates.
  • More frequent evaluation of teachers as the way to fix educational issues.
  • Social media regulated by university administration: putting an end to suicides .
  • Resistance to change in organizations: problems and solutions.
  • Introducing intercultural studies and foreign language classes at school to fight biases.
  • New technologies: the ways to encourage people to start reading books .
  • The problem of expensive education: why should community colleges be free?
  • The necessity to implement cyber courts to help with the issue of cyberbullying.
  • The ways that science and religion can co-exist to reduce worldwide conflicts.
  • Allowing students to make jokes in class as a way to make education more engaging.
  • Can going online improve the existing education system?
  • Saving endangered species: can the government’s involvement help to solve the problem?
  • Having a pet as a way to deal with emotional stress and anxiety for college students.
  • How can cultural diversity benefit the business?
  • How do we prevent job discrimination related to race and religion?
  • Free professional help for divorced people as a means to prevent serious psychological issues .
  • How can listening to sad songs help people release their emotions when they are upset?
  • The difficulties of learning: how can music improve your academic performance?
  • Radical solutions: legalizing marijuana as a way of preventing crimes related to drugs.
  • Allowing people with tattoos to get any job helps increase tolerance and empathy.
  • Psychology: the art of being happy as a mandatory class in colleges for increasing mental health.
  • Learning a second language as a way toward self-improvement.
  • Strict policy regarding dating at the workplace as the means to prevent conflicts.
  • Practical strategies for fighting and elevating poverty around the globe.

✨ Problem Cause Solution Speech Topics

Problem-cause-solution speech is a very effective way to persuade your audience that you are a reliable expert. It requires you to analyze the causes of the issue in detail and come up with the best solution!

  • The leading causes of binge drinking on college campuses and the ways to eliminate it.
  • What are the decisive reasons for the high car accident rate, and how do we decrease it?
  • Causes of global warming and possible ways of solving the problem .
  • Why are so many prisons getting overcrowded , and what is the most humane solution?
  • Inflation and high cost of living : how to find the solution to those problems?
  • The evaluation system for teachers as the means of improving the quality of school education.
  • The problem of school dropouts and possible interventions.
  • What are the leading causes of sex education failure in school, and how to fix it?
  • Why are we so dependent on fossil fuels, and how do we solve this issue?
  • What causes truancy, and how to deal with it?
  • Reducing the use of plastic as a way to solve some of the environmental problems.
  • What is contributing to the current obesity epidemic , and how do we stop it?
  • The reasons some people are dependent on prescription drugs and ways to solve them.
  • Why did London’s new ambulance service fail, and how can the issue be resolved?
  • Engage college students to become more politically active as a way to raise political consciousness.
  • The problem of personal vs. private privacy and ways to solve it.
  • The problem of toxic relationships and ways to solve it.
  • What causes violence on social media, and what are the best ways to deal with it?
  • Why are many long-distance relationships unsuccessful, and what are the ways to change that?
  • Communities: why have we stopped getting along with neighbors, and what are the solutions?
  • Kodak company’s strategic issue and solution.
  • What causes so many teenagers to fall into depression, and how can family and teachers help to solve this issue?
  • The leading causes of athletes using steroids in sports, and how can we stop it?
  • What causes air pollution, and how to deal with it?
  • Why do some teens keep dropping out of school , and how can it be prevented?
  • How should we educate parents about controlling their child’s social media use, and why is that a problem at all?
  • How do parents shape children’s understanding of relationships and ways to avoid bad influences and scenarios?
  • Amazon Local Company’s failure: reasons and ways to fix it.
  • Hackers can attack digital transactions. What are the ways to keep them safe?
  • The main reasons for information overload and how should people avoid it?

📝 Problem Solution Essay Topics for Business

  • Marketing ROI: the problem of ROI assessment and the potential solutions.
  • How to avoid labor exploitation.
  • What are the responsible management challenges and solutions for the B.P. company?
  • The issue of youth unemployment and possible solutions.
  • How should companies audit their policies to ensure they discourage, rather than encourage, discrimination among workers ?
  • H.R. portfolio of evidence: project management and problem-solving techniques.
  • How to effectively avoid social problems in a workplace.
  • How do you deal with the problem of alcoholism at work?
  • How to avoid sexual harassment in the workplace?
  • Ways to deal with the company’s global communication problems.
  • How to deal with the food prices increase?
  • How can a company maintain a good conflict-resolution strategy?
  • Ways to avoid bankruptcy.
  • Classic Airlines marketing problems and possible solutions.
  • The problem of monopolization in America : can a small business survive?
  • Ways to improve employees’ satisfaction.
  • How to incorporate problem-solving into marketing.
  • How can Amazon Company’s ethical problems and challenges be resolved?
  • Gender pay-gap issue in the U.S. and possible solutions.
  • Ways to solve management problems in the tourism and hospitality industry

💭 Problem Solution Essay Topics 2024

Let’s see which 2024 problems are the most relevant so that you can use them as a problem solution essay topic:

  • Is relying on COVID-19 vaccines the right strategy to fight the world pandemic?
  • University education: problems and possible ways to improve?
  • Accepting the new normal or fighting for the old normal: which is more effective for stopping the outbreak?
  • Employing a diverse workforce: challenges and solutions.
  • How do we help the most vulnerable communities during the COVID-19 outbreak?
  • How to cultivate respect for other cultures?
  • Learning issues in the public school system and ways to improve the condition.
  • Climate change : is being prepared for the effects a better solution than trying to prevent it?
  • What are the ways in which digital giants can improve to avoid information breaches and exposure?
  • Innovative strategies to make big cities more equal and less divided for their citizens.
  • How using renewable resources can help deal with climate change?
  • How do migrants affect public health systems, and what should we do about it?
  • How can we help small-scale farmers with adaptation to climate change?
  • What are the best leadership styles that can contribute to the business’s success during COVID-19?
  • The new ways to fact-check information online and prevent dangerous rumors.
  • Restation of local economies by helping small businesses and encouraging young talents.
  • Interdisciplinary studying: benefits, challenges, and solutions.
  • Right and effective leadership as a way of achieving sustainable development goals.
  • How can international collaboration for every country help to achieve carbon neutrality?
  • Cloud services for businesses: issues, benefits, and possible solutions .
  • What are the ways to reduce the number of tobacco consumption?
  • The U.N. and multilateralism : how can we achieve more by working together as humanity?
  • How can market analysis benefit the company?
  • How can we help cultural cohesion and stop fragmentation by avoiding multiculturalism ?
  • How are social issues such as violence and racism addressed in gangsta rap and rock music?
  • Making cyberbullying a criminal offense as one of the most effective ways to fight it.
  • Restore humanities: teaching children how to be humans as the way to solve the global crisis.
  • Way to make an advertising campaign successful?
  • Promoting values and cognitive behavioral therapy to fight mental health issues.
  • How can promoting open debates on essential topics help fight herd mentality?

📚 Problem Solution Essay Topics for College Students

There is a variety of disciplines in this list, so any college student can find something suitable for them here:

  • One random act of kindness as a way to create happier societies.
  • Funding volunteering promotion as a way to boost people’s awareness.
  • Social media and its effect on the younger generation: problems and solutions.
  • Can everyone having personal solar panels help to save the environment?
  • How do augmented reality glasses help people with disabilities see the world?
  • Can strict gun control laws reduce the number of homicide cases committed in the USA?
  • The problem with dolls: why should we promote the production of dolls of different shapes and colors for children ?
  • What rules should be introduced to fight market monopolization and increase competition?
  • What can society do to prevent people from getting an eating disorder?
  • Can students’ active involvement in the learning process improve their academic results?
  • Implementing A.I. and machine learning methods to help companies build a relationship with their customers.
  • Promoting a specific level of individualism in a business setting to help problem-solving.
  • How can total transparency boost the customer’s trust and increase sales?
  • Time management problem and possible solutions.
  • How can athletes prevent injuries that take them out of competitive sports?
  • Setting some responsibilities and duties for children as the way to help them become more successful in life.
  • Studying abroad and graduate employability: challenges and recommendations.
  • Why does developing family traditions help the more substantial relationship and reduce conflicts?
  • What is the main problem with current meal plans at schools, and what is the solution?
  • Educating people about herbal remedies as a way to promote over-the-counter medicines .
  • The challenges and solutions of introducing a new performance management system for a multicultural team.
  • What policies should be implemented to eliminate the problem of child labor?
  • Is raising the prices of tobacco an effective way to make humanity healthier?
  • Switching to online learning platforms as the new approach to available and affordable education.
  • Can the implementation of electric cars bring some positive environmental changes and a decrease in air pollution?
  • Do kids prefer to read eBooks , and how can we use them to encourage book reading?
  • Setting fair prices for streaming services as the way to fight online piracy .
  • How can organizational goals help the company succeed?
  • Should we all use adblocking software to avoid online fraud and malware?
  • Creating more natural habitats such as national parks as a way to protect endangered species.
  • How do you effectively manage organizational behavior?
  • Small steps: how does local buying help reduce soil pollution from big companies?
  • Kids and sports: how the lack of professional sports guides can be addressed?
  • Should we pay more attention to cleaning trees from invasive vegetation?
  • How to stop animal poaching by promoting the use of ethical materials?

The major U.S motion picture studios lost $6.1 billion in 2005 to piracy worldwide.

🐻 Problem Solution Essay Topics for Middle School

Here are some great examples of topics that may interest or be discussed by middle school students:

  • Can a college degree be one of the solutions for reducing the risks of divorce?
  • Learning to smile through pain as the way to make you feel better.
  • Online learning vs. face-to-face learning: problems and solutions .
  • Small changes in life as a way to treat depression .
  • Listening to audiobooks as a way to improve your literacy?
  • Tourism industry: why should it be supported, what challenges does it faces, and what are the solutions?
  • Switching chairs in classrooms to more comfortable ones as the way to improve attendance.
  • If most of the world’s population turns vegetarians, will it help climate change?
  • The issues with high school uniforms and possible solutions.
  • The effectiveness of placing more speed bumps to reduce the rates of accidents.
  • Implementing mandatory student exchange programs in colleges to fight cultural biases.
  • The danger of popular diets and ways to deal with it.
  • Fixing pollution issues as the only way to secure healthy nations in the Future.
  • How does a fair division of house chores help prevent family conflicts?
  • Homeschooling: issues and possible solutions.
  • Owning and petting a cat regularly as the best way to reduce stress ?
  • What are the best ways to prevent deaths due to drunk driving?
  • How to keep a workplace safe, and why is it important?
  • How does playing team sports help with communication skills in teenagers?
  • How to deal with challenges at work as a team leader?
  • Can people using eBooks contribute to solving environmental issues ?
  • How do handwritten letters help share emotions within the family during the conflict?
  • How can we use online communication to learn languages more effectively?
  • Dealing with conflict: strategies for responses.
  • How does the cultural trend of “going green” help with environmental changes?
  • Should we focus on inventing more renewable energy sources to help pollution?

💊 Problem Solution Topics. Solutions

Here are some great examples of problem solution speech topics to get an idea of what it should look like:

  • Limit the time kids spend on the internet.
  • Make sure that kids use only appropriate for their age websites.
  • Place the computer in an open common area to easily monitor kids’ activity.
  • Educate teenagers on the unprecedented danger of using the internet.
  • Parents should support their kids to make sure they can resist the influence of drug abuse.
  • Schools should create programs that spread awareness of the consequence of drug use.
  • The community should be more involved in drug prevention activities.
  • The government should implement policies that address drug use among school-age youth.
  • Enforce strong laws against child abusers.
  • Spread awareness regarding the problem of child abuse.
  • Take matters of child abuse seriously and lead comprehensive investigations.
  • Implement behavior therapy that helps patients plan and deal with their strong food cravings.
  • Use a cognitive approach that helps patients to channel and be in control of their negative thoughts.
  • Expose patients to interpersonal psychotherapy, which focuses on “family-based” treatment.
  • Parents should talk to their kids about their future career plans and encourage their developing interests and beginnings.
  • Schools should facilitate tutoring, mentoring, and out-of-school programs.
  • The government should provide more social and financial support to the students and their families.
  • Avoid opening suspicious messages and e-mail attachments, especially from unknown users.
  • Avoid Executing any Executable Programs in the attachments.
  • Avoid downloading cracked software on websites.
  • Block Scripts by Default in Internet Browsers.
  • Install anti-virus software ad security patches.
  • Disable Autorun for C.D.s, Flash Drives, and other Removable Media.
  • Switch to biodegradable materials for packaging.
  • Reduce the consumption of goods that use non-biodegradable plastic. Check out this link for more perspective solutions: 10 Measures that Must Be Taken to Prevent More Flooding in the Future
  • Learn to identify barriers and problems.
  • Build your own self-concept.
  • Try to strengthen your emotional intelligence.
  • Work on your self-disclosure and be open with your partner or family members.
  • Learn to handle the conflicts.
  • Parents should make sure that their kids feel loved and accepted.
  • Praise children when they achieve their accomplishments, and don’t criticize them in front of their peers.
  • Teach children to have positive self-statements and give them a chance to evaluate themselves. Let the children see how their good actions positively affect others.

By addressing real-world problems through our speeches, we can develop a sense of responsibility toward creating positive change. For your inspiration, we have prepared a short problem-solving speech example on obesity.

Obesity Problem Solution Speech

Good morning, everyone. It’s a pleasure to be here with you today! I want to direct your attention to an issue that has been steadily growing in significance and deserves our immediate concern – childhood obesity. Did you know that in 2021-2022, 17.0% of young people aged 10 to 17 had obesity? This rise in childhood obesity is a multifaceted issue with diverse causative factors, including sedentary lifestyles, poor dietary habits, limited access to healthy foods, and societal influences. The consequences of childhood obesity are profound and alarming. It increases the risk of numerous health issues, such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, obese children often face social and emotional challenges, including stigmatization and low self-esteem, which can have long-lasting effects on their mental health and overall quality of life. So, what can we do to tackle childhood obesity effectively? The solution lies in a comprehensive and concerted effort involving various stakeholders, parents, educators, healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the community. Firstly, promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviors among children is paramount. This can be achieved by increasing access to sports facilities, integrating physical education into school curricula, and encouraging outdoor and recreational activities. Additionally, addressing dietary habits is crucial. Providing access to nutritious meals in schools, educating children and their parents about healthy eating practices, and limiting the availability of unhealthy food options can contribute to positive changes in children’s diets. In conclusion, combating childhood obesity requires a multifaceted approach encompassing education, environmental changes, and supportive policies. Thank you!

More Problem Solution Persuasive Speech Examples

Here are some bonus problem-solution speech examples given by TED Talk speakers.

  • “The Simple Solution to Fast Fashion” — Josephine Philips In her TED Talk, Josephine Philips presents a simple solution to fast fashion. She advocates for a shift toward sustainable and ethical clothing consumption. By embracing timeless styles, supporting eco-friendly brands, and practicing mindful shopping, she believes individuals can significantly lessen the harmful effects of fast fashion on the environment.
  • “A Close-to-Home Solution for Accessible Childcare” — Chris Bennett In his brilliant speech, Chris Bennett proposes a community-based approach to accessible childcare. He advocates for creating local co-op childcare centers where parents take turns supervising children. By leveraging existing resources and building a supportive network, he believes this model can provide affordable and reliable childcare for families in need.
  • “The Real Solution to Global Warming” — Supratim Kundu In his TED Talk, Supratim Kundu argues that the real solution to global warming lies in harnessing the power of capitalism and private industry. He believes incentivizing the private sector to address environmental issues is more effective and efficient than relying solely on government intervention.

You got lucky when you found our list of problem solution speech topics! We will also direct you to other resources that will help you write a paper 😎

Start with this complete breakdown of how to write a problem solution essay , then create a problem solution speech structure , and—voila—you’re all set to conquer your text!

Check out more sources below in references.

And if you are still struggling with it, simply read some problem solution essay examples for both college and high school.

Have you grabbed a couple of problem solution essay topics from our list?

Good luck with solving them now🍀

🔗 References

  • Transitions in Text; University of North Carolina
  • Problem-Solution Essays: Definition and Examples
  • Problem-Solving Skills: Definitions and Examples
  • A Problem Solving Approach
  • What Are Problem Solving Skills?

414 Proposal Essay Topics for Projects, Research, & Proposal Arguments

725 research proposal topics & title ideas in education, psychology, business, & more.

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Speech Time Fun: Speech and Language Activities

Teaching Problem and Solution in Speech

problem solution in speech

Determining problem and solution is one of those skills that is addressed in just about every grade over the course of each year. Beginning in 4th grade, students are expected to “Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.” CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.5. This concept is extended to finding the problem and solution within 2 texts in 5th grade, and continues to be addressed throughout a student’s school career. 

Problems and solutions within texts are sometimes explicitly stated, and sometimes they have to be inferred. Making inferences is a skill that many students struggle with, and some students even struggle with identifying problems that have been stated explicitly. Fortunately, there are many ways that we can help our speech students with problem and solution, all while working on speech goals!

Why Teach Problem and Solution?

We teach problem and solution because it helps students dig deeper into the text. They can put themselves in a character’s shoes and think about what they would do or how they would feel if they were in that character’s position. This helps students to not only read the words on the page but to gain a better understanding of the situations happening in the story. 

Finding the Problem

problem solution in speech

If the problem in a text is not explicitly stated, there are some questions that you can ask your students to help them find the problem. These include: 

  • What made the character or characters upset?
  • How did the story change for the characters?
  • What went wrong in the story? How did this make the character or characters feel? 
  • Could the problem have not happened? How or why? 

By using these questions, you can work on speech goals in several areas. Asking these questions aloud and letting the student answer orally can help them to work on articulation, answering “wh” questions, voice, pragmatics, narrative development, and fluency. 

Finding the Solution

problem solution in speech

Once the student has found the problem in a passage, then they must find the solution or solutions that are given. One way to do this is to ask questions like the following: 

  • What did the character or characters do to solve the problem?
  • How did they solve the problem?
  • How would you have solved the problem if you were in this story?
  • Did they try any solutions that did not work? If so, why did these not work? 

When determining the solution or solutions to the problem in the text, students can work on the following speech skills:

  • Articulation by answering these questions and talking through the solutions orally. 
  • Receptive language skills like answering questions by writing down, highlighting, or circling the solutions to the problem. 
  • Completing a sort of problems and solutions can work on expressive language and pragmatic goals like inferencing. 

Determining Pros and Cons  

problem solution in speech

Sometimes, more than one solution to a problem is presented in a story. The student may have to determine the best solution or decide what they would do in a character’s situation. To do this, the student can list or discuss the possible solutions and decide what the pros and cons of each solution are. This discussion or writing activity can address goals in the areas of expressive language, articulation, conversation, and narrative development. Then, the student can decide what solution is the best one for the problem presented in the story. 

I hope you found this helpful and if you need more ideas on how to teach problem and solution in speech, then check out my no-prep problem-and-solution stories for the year! 

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7.3 Organizational Patterns of Arrangement

Two OSU students sitting at a laptop together discussing an assignment.

After deciding which main points and subpoints you must include, you can get to work writing up the speech. Before you do so, however, it is helpful to consider how you will organize the ideas. There are many ways you can organize speeches, and these approaches will be different depending on whether you are preparing an informative or persuasive speech. These are referred to as organizational patterns for arranging your main points in a speech. The chronological (or temporal), topical , spatial , or causal patterns may be better suited to informative speeches, whereas the Problem-Solution, Monroe’s Motivated Sequence (Monroe, 1949), Claim-to-Proof (Mudd & Sillar, 1962), or Refutation pattern would work best for persuasive speeches. Sample outlines for persuasive speeches can be found in Chapter 17.

Chronological Pattern

When you speak about events that are linked together by time, it is sensible to engage the chronological organization pattern. In a chronological speech, main points are delivered according to when they happened and could be traced on a calendar or clock. Some professors use the term temporal to reflect any speech pattern dealing with taking the audience through time. Arranging main points in chronological order can be helpful when describing historical events to an audience as well as when the order of events is necessary to understand what you wish to convey. Informative speeches about a series of events most commonly engage the chronological style, as do many process speeches (e.g., how to bake a cake or build an airplane). Another time when the chronological style makes sense is when you tell the story of someone’s life or career. For instance, a speech about Oprah Winfrey might be arranged chronologically. In this case, the main points are arranged by following Winfrey’s life from birth to the present time. Life events (e.g., early life, her early career, her life after ending the Oprah Winfrey Show) are connected together according to when they happened and highlight the progression of Winfrey’s career. Organizing the speech in this way illustrates the interconnectedness of life events. Below you will find a way in which you can organize your main points chronologically:

Topic : Oprah Winfrey (Chronological Pattern)

Thesis : Oprah’s career can be understood by four key, interconnected life stages.

Preview : First, let’s look at Oprah’s early life. Then, we will look at her early career, followed by her years during the Oprah Winfrey show. Finally, we will explore what she is doing now.

I.       Oprah’s childhood was spent in rural Mississippi, where she endured sexual abuse from family members II.     Oprah’s early career was characterized by stints on local radio and television networks in Nashville and Chicago. III.    Oprah’s tenure as host of the Oprah Winfrey Show began in 1986 and lasted until 2011, a period of time marked by much success. IV.     Oprah’s most recent media venture is OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network, which plays host to a variety of television shows including Oprah’s Next Chapter .

Topical Pattern

When the main points of your speech center on ideas that are more distinct from one another, a topical organization pattern may be used. In a topical speech, main points are developed according to the different aspects, subtopics or topics within an overall topic. Although they are all part of the overall topic, the order in which they are presented really doesn’t matter. For example, you are currently attending college. Within your college, there are various student services that are important for you to use while you are here. You may use the library, The Learning Center (TLC), Student Development office, ASG Computer Lab, and Financial Aid. To organize this speech topically, it doesn’t matter which area you speak about first, but here is how you could organize it.

Topic : Student Services at College of the Canyons

Thesis and Preview : College of the Canyons has five important student services, which include the library, TLC, Student Development Office, ASG Computer Lab, and Financial Aid.

I.       The library can be accessed five days a week and online and has a multitude of books, periodicals, and other resources to use. II.      The TLC has subject tutors, computers, and study rooms available to use six days a week. III.     The Student Development Office is a place that assists students with their ID cards, but also provides students with discount tickets and other student related      needs. IV.      The ASG computer lab is open for students to use for several hours a day, as well as to print up to 15 pages a day for free. V.       Financial Aid is one of the busiest offices on campus, offering students a multitude of methods by which they can supplement their personal finances paying             for both tuition and books.

Spatial Pattern

Another way to organize the points of a speech is through a spatial speech, which arranges main points according to their physical and geographic relationships. The spatial style is an especially useful organization pattern when the main point’s importance is derived from its location or directional focus. Things can be described from top to bottom, inside to outside, left to right, north to south, and so on. Importantly, speakers using a spatial style should offer commentary about the placement of the main points as they move through the speech, alerting audience members to the location changes. For instance, a speech about The University of Georgia might be arranged spatially; in this example, the spatial organization frames the discussion in terms of the campus layout. The spatial style is fitting since the differences in architecture and uses of space are related to particular geographic areas, making location a central organizing factor. As such, the spatial style highlights these location differences.

Topic : University of Georgia (Spatial Pattern)

Thesis : The University of Georgia is arranged into four distinct sections, which are characterized by architectural and disciplinary differences.

I.      In North Campus, one will find the University’s oldest building,     a sprawling treelined quad, and the famous Arches, all of which are nestled against Athens’ downtown district. II.     In West Campus, dozens of dormitories provide housing for the University’s large     undergraduate population and students can regularly be found lounging outside     or at one of the dining halls. III.    In East Campus, students delight in newly constructed, modern buildings and     enjoy the benefits of the University’s health center, recreational facilities, and     science research buildings. IV.     In South Campus, pharmacy, veterinary, and biomedical science students traverse     newly constructed parts of campus featuring well-kept landscaping and modern     architecture.

Causal Pattern

A causal speech informs audience members about causes and effects that have already happened with respect to some condition, event, etc. One approach can be to share what caused something to happen, and what the effects were. Or, the reverse approach can be taken where a speaker can begin by sharing the effects of something that occurred, and then share what caused it. For example, in 1994, there was a 6.7 magnitude earthquake that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in Northridge, California. Let’s look at how we can arrange this speech first by using a cause-effect pattern:

Topic : Northridge Earthquake

Thesis : The Northridge earthquake was a devastating event that was caused by an unknown fault and resulted in the loss of life and billions of dollars of damage.

I. The Northridge earthquake was caused by a fault that was previously unknown and located nine miles beneath Northridge. II. The Northridge earthquake resulted in the loss of 57 lives and over 40 billion dollars of damage in Northridge and surrounding communities.

Depending on your topic, you may decide it is more impactful to start with the effects, and work back to the causes (effect-cause pattern). Let’s take the same example and flip it around:

Thesis : The Northridge earthquake was a devastating event that was that resulted in the loss of life and billions of dollars in damage, and was caused by an unknown fault below Northridge.

I.      The Northridge earthquake resulted in the loss of 57 lives and over 40 billion dollars of damage in Northridge and surrounding communities. II.    The Northridge earthquake was caused by a fault that was previously unknown and located nine miles beneath Northridge.

Why might you decide to use an effect-cause approach rather than a cause-effect approach? In this particular example, the effects of the earthquake were truly horrible. If you heard all of that information first, you would be much more curious to hear about what caused such devastation. Sometimes natural disasters are not that exciting, even when they are horrible. Why? Unless they affect us directly, we may not have the same attachment to the topic. This is one example where an effect-cause approach may be very impactful.

main points are delivered according to when they happened and could be traced on a calendar or clock

main points are developed according to the different aspects, subtopics or topics within an overall topic.

useful organization pattern when the main point’s importance is derived from its location or directional focus

organizational pattern that reasons from cause to effect or from effect to cause

Introduction to Speech Communication Copyright © 2021 by Individual authors retain copyright of their work. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Home » Blog » General » Understanding the Role of Speech Therapy in Problem Solving Development

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Understanding the Role of Speech Therapy in Problem Solving Development

Keywords: speech therapy, problem solving

I. Introduction

Problem-solving skills play a crucial role in our everyday lives. From making decisions to resolving conflicts, these skills enable us to navigate through various challenges. However, for individuals with speech and language disorders, developing effective problem-solving abilities can be a significant challenge. This is where speech therapy comes in. In this blog post, we will explore the role of speech therapy in problem-solving development and how it can help individuals overcome communication barriers and enhance their problem-solving skills.

A. Importance of Problem-Solving Skills in Everyday Life

Problem-solving skills are essential for individuals of all ages. From a young age, we encounter various situations that require us to think critically, analyze information, and come up with effective solutions. Whether it’s figuring out how to complete a puzzle or resolving conflicts with friends, problem-solving abilities are crucial for personal, academic, and professional success.

B. Role of Speech Therapy in Problem-Solving Development

Speech therapy plays a vital role in supporting individuals with speech and language disorders in developing their problem-solving skills. By addressing underlying communication difficulties, speech therapists can help individuals improve their ability to express themselves, understand others, and engage in effective problem-solving strategies.

II. Understanding Speech Therapy

A. definition and purpose of speech therapy.

Speech therapy, also known as speech-language therapy, is a specialized form of therapy that focuses on assessing, diagnosing, and treating communication disorders. The primary goal of speech therapy is to improve an individual’s ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and non-verbally.

B. Common Speech and Language Disorders

Speech and language disorders can manifest in various ways, impacting an individual’s ability to communicate and, consequently, their problem-solving skills. Some common speech and language disorders include:

  • Articulation disorders: difficulties with pronouncing sounds and forming words correctly.
  • Language disorders: challenges with understanding and using language effectively.
  • Fluency disorders: disruptions in the flow of speech, such as stuttering.
  • Voice disorders: abnormalities in pitch, volume, or quality of the voice.

III. Speech Therapy and Problem Solving

A. connection between speech and language skills and problem-solving abilities.

Speech and language skills are closely intertwined with problem-solving abilities. Effective communication involves not only expressing oneself clearly but also understanding others, interpreting social cues, and adapting to different situations. Individuals with speech and language difficulties may struggle with these essential components of problem-solving, making it challenging for them to navigate through everyday life.

B. How Speech Therapy Can Enhance Problem-Solving Skills

Speech therapy provides individuals with the necessary tools and strategies to improve their communication skills, thereby enhancing their problem-solving abilities. Through targeted interventions, speech therapists work on improving language comprehension, expressive language skills, social communication, and cognitive-linguistic abilities. By addressing these areas, individuals can develop the foundation needed for effective problem-solving.

IV. Techniques Used in Speech Therapy for Problem Solving

Speech therapists utilize various techniques and approaches to support individuals in developing their problem-solving skills. Some common techniques include:

A. Communication Strategies

Speech therapists teach individuals effective communication strategies, such as using visual aids, gestures, and alternative communication systems (e.g., augmentative and alternative communication devices). These strategies help individuals overcome communication barriers and express their thoughts and ideas more effectively, facilitating problem-solving.

B. Cognitive-Linguistic Exercises

Cognitive-linguistic exercises focus on improving cognitive skills, such as attention, memory, reasoning, and problem-solving. Speech therapists incorporate these exercises into therapy sessions to enhance an individual’s cognitive abilities, which are essential for effective problem-solving.

C. Social Skills Training

Social skills training is a crucial component of speech therapy for individuals with speech and language disorders. By teaching social communication skills, such as turn-taking, active listening, and perspective-taking, speech therapists help individuals navigate social interactions and problem-solving situations effectively.

V. Collaborative Approach in Speech Therapy

A. working with parents and caregivers.

Speech therapy is most effective when it extends beyond the therapy room. Speech therapists work closely with parents and caregivers to ensure that strategies and techniques learned in therapy are reinforced and practiced in everyday situations. By involving parents and caregivers, speech therapists create a collaborative approach that maximizes the impact of therapy on problem-solving development.

B. Collaboration with Other Professionals

Speech therapists often collaborate with other professionals, such as educators, psychologists, and occupational therapists, to provide comprehensive support to individuals with speech and language disorders. This interdisciplinary approach ensures that all aspects of an individual’s development are addressed, including problem-solving skills.

VI. Benefits of Speech Therapy in Problem Solving Development

A. improved communication skills.

One of the primary benefits of speech therapy is improved communication skills. As individuals develop their speech and language abilities, they can express themselves more effectively, understand others better, and engage in meaningful conversations. These enhanced communication skills directly contribute to improved problem-solving abilities.

B. Enhanced Cognitive Abilities

Speech therapy interventions, such as cognitive-linguistic exercises, can enhance an individual’s cognitive abilities. By improving attention, memory, reasoning, and problem-solving skills, speech therapy helps individuals develop the cognitive foundation necessary for effective problem-solving.

C. Increased Self-Confidence and Self-Esteem

Individuals with speech and language disorders often experience challenges in social interactions, which can impact their self-confidence and self-esteem. Through speech therapy, individuals gain the skills and strategies to navigate social situations and communicate effectively. As a result, their self-confidence and self-esteem improve, enabling them to approach problem-solving tasks with a positive mindset.

VII. Conclusion

A. recap of the role of speech therapy in problem-solving development.

Speech therapy plays a crucial role in supporting individuals with speech and language disorders in developing their problem-solving skills. By addressing communication difficulties, speech therapists provide individuals with the necessary tools and strategies to express themselves, understand others, and engage in effective problem-solving strategies.

B. Encouragement to Seek Professional Help for Speech and Language Concerns

If you or someone you know is experiencing speech and language difficulties that are impacting problem-solving abilities, it is essential to seek professional help. Speech therapists are trained professionals who can assess, diagnose, and provide targeted interventions to support individuals in their communication and problem-solving development.

Start your EverydaySpeech Free trial today and take the first step towards enhancing problem-solving skills through speech therapy.

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48 Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, Problem-Solution, Comparative Advantages

Learning objectives.

  • Understand three common organizational patterns for persuasive speeches.
  • Explain the steps utilized in Monroe’s motivated sequence.
  • Explain the parts of a problem-cause-solution speech.
  • Explain the process utilized in a comparative advantage persuasive speech.

Organizing Persuasive Speeches

A classroom of attentive listeners

Previously in this text, we discussed general guidelines for organizing speeches. In this section, we are going to look at three organizational patterns ideally suited for persuasive speeches: Monroe’s motivated sequence, problem-cause-solution, and comparative advantages.

Monroe’s Motivated Sequence

One of the most commonly cited and discussed organizational patterns for persuasive speeches is Alan H. Monroe’s motivated sequence. The purpose of Monroe’s motivated sequence is to help speakers “sequence supporting materials and motivational appeals to form a useful organizational pattern for speeches as a whole” (German et al., 2010).

While Monroe’s motivated sequence is commonly discussed in most public speaking textbooks, we do want to provide one minor caution. Thus far, almost no research has been conducted that has demonstrated that Monroe’s motivated sequence is any more persuasive than other structural patterns. In the only study conducted experimentally examining Monroe’s motivated sequence, the researchers did not find the method more persuasive but did note that audience members found the pattern more organized than other methods (Micciche, Pryor, & Butler, 2000). We wanted to add this sidenote because we don’t want you to think that Monroe’s motivated sequence is a kind of magic persuasive bullet; the research simply doesn’t support this notion. At the same time, research does support that organized messages are perceived as more persuasive as a whole, so using Monroe’s motivated sequence to think through one’s persuasive argument could still be very beneficial.

Below are the basic steps of Monroe’s motivated sequence and the subsequent reaction a speaker desires from his or her audience.

The first step in Monroe’s motivated sequence is the  attention step , in which a speaker attempts to get the audience’s attention. To gain an audience’s attention, we recommend that you think through three specific parts of the attention step. First, you need to have a strong attention-getting device. As previously discussed, a strong attention getter at the beginning of your speech is very important. Second, you need to make sure you introduce your topic clearly. If your audience doesn’t know what your topic is quickly, they are more likely to stop listening. Lastly, you need to explain to your audience why they should care about your topic. If this sounds familiar, it should! The attention step uses the same elements as an introduction for any speech: The attention getter, relevance, credibility, thesis statement, and preview.

In the  need step of Monroe’s motivated sequence, the speaker establishes that there is a specific need or problem. This will be your first main point. In Monroe’s conceptualization of need, he talks about four specific parts of the need: statement, illustration, ramification, and pointing. First, a speaker needs to give a clear and concise statement of the problem. This part of a speech should be crystal clear for an audience. Second, the speaker needs to provide one or more examples to illustrate the need. The illustration is an attempt to make the problem concrete for the audience. Next, a speaker needs to provide some kind of evidence (e.g., statistics, examples, testimony) that shows the ramifications or consequences of the problem. Lastly, a speaker needs to point to the audience and show exactly how the problem relates to them personally.

Satisfaction

In the third step of Monroe’s motivated sequence, the  satisfaction step , the speaker sets out to satisfy the need or solve the problem. This will be your second main point. Within this step, Monroe (1935) proposed a five-step plan for satisfying a need:

  • Explanation
  • Theoretical demonstration
  • Reference to practical experience
  • Meeting objections

First, you need to clearly state the attitude, value, belief, or action you want your audience to accept. The purpose of this statement is to clearly tell your audience what your ultimate goal is.

Second, you want to make sure that you clearly explain to your audience why they should accept the attitude, value, belief, or action you proposed. Just telling your audience they should do something isn’t strong enough to actually get them to change. Instead, you really need to provide a solid argument for why they should accept your proposed solution.

Third, you need to show how the solution you have proposed meets the need or problem. Monroe calls this link between your solution and the need a theoretical demonstration because you cannot prove that your solution will work. Instead, you theorize based on research and good judgment that your solution will meet the need or solve the problem.

Fourth, to help with this theoretical demonstration, you need to reference practical experience, which should include examples demonstrating that your proposal has worked elsewhere. Research, statistics, and expert testimony are all great ways of referencing practical experience.

Lastly, Monroe recommends that a speaker responds to possible objections. As a persuasive speaker, one of your jobs is to think through your speech and see what counterarguments could be made against your speech and then rebut those arguments within your speech. When you offer rebuttals for arguments against your speech, it shows your audience that you’ve done your homework and educated yourself about multiple sides of the issue.

Visualization

The next step of Monroe’s motivated sequence is the  visualization step , in which you ask the audience to visualize a future where the need has been met or the problem solved. This will be your third main point. In essence, the visualization stage is where a speaker can show the audience why accepting a specific attitude, value, belief, or behavior can positively affect the future. When helping people to picture the future, the more concrete your visualization is, the easier it will be for your audience to see the possible future and be persuaded by it. You also need to make sure that you clearly show how accepting your solution will directly benefit your audience.

According to Monroe, visualization can be conducted in one of three ways: positive, negative, or contrast (Monroe, 1935). The positive method of visualization is where a speaker shows how adopting a proposal leads to a better future (e.g., recycle, and we’ll have a cleaner and safer planet). Conversely, the negative method of visualization is where a speaker shows how not adopting the proposal will lead to a worse future (e.g., don’t recycle, and our world will become polluted and uninhabitable). Monroe also acknowledged that visualization can include a combination of both positive and negative visualization. In essence, you show your audience both possible outcomes and have them decide which one they would rather have.

The final step in Monroe’s motivated sequence is the  action step , in which a speaker asks an audience to approve the speaker’s proposal. For understanding purposes, we break the action into two distinct parts: audience action and approval. Audience action refers to direct physical behaviors a speaker wants from an audience (e.g., flossing their teeth twice a day, signing a petition, wearing seat belts). Approval, on the other hand, involves an audience’s consent or agreement with a speaker’s proposed attitude, value, or belief.

When preparing an action step, it is important to make sure that the action, whether audience action or approval, is realistic for your audience. Asking your peers in a college classroom to donate one thousand dollars to charity isn’t realistic. Asking your peers to donate one dollar is considerably more realistic. In a persuasive speech based on Monroe’s motivated sequence, the action step will end with the speech’s concluding device. As discussed elsewhere in this text, you need to make sure that you conclude in a vivid way so that the speech ends on a high point and the audience has a sense of energy as well as a sense of closure.

This step will be your conclusion. Again, it will have the same elements as a conclusion you would use for any speech.

Application

Now that we’ve walked through Monroe’s motivated sequence, let’s look at how you could use Monroe’s motivated sequence to outline a persuasive speech:

Specific Purpose:  To persuade my classroom peers that the United States should have stronger laws governing the use of for-profit medical experiments.

Main Points:

  • Attention:  Want to make nine thousand dollars for just three weeks of work lying around and not doing much? Then be a human guinea pig. Admittedly, you’ll have to have a tube down your throat most of those three weeks, but you’ll earn three thousand dollars a week.
  • Need:  Every day many uneducated and lower socioeconomic-status citizens are preyed on by medical and pharmaceutical companies for use in for-profit medical and drug experiments. Do you want one of your family members to fall prey to this evil scheme?
  • Satisfaction:  The United States should have stronger laws governing the use of for-profit medical experiments to ensure that uneducated and lower-socioeconomic-status citizens are protected.
  • Visualization:  If we enact tougher experiment oversight, we can ensure that medical and pharmaceutical research is conducted in a way that adheres to basic values of American decency. If we do not enact tougher experiment oversight, we could find ourselves in a world where the lines between research subject, guinea pig, and patient become increasingly blurred.
  • Action:  In order to prevent the atrocities associated with for-profit medical and pharmaceutical experiments, please sign this petition asking the US Department of Health and Human Services to pass stricter regulations on this preying industry that is out of control.

This example shows how you can take a basic speech topic and use Monroe’s motivated sequence to clearly and easily outline your speech efficiently and effectively.

Below is a checklist that contains a simple checklist to help you make sure you hit all the important components of Monroe’s motivated sequence.

The following video further details Monroe’s Motivated Sequence outlining each component and providing examples to provide an in-depth understanding of the organizational pattern.

For Future Reference | How to organize this in an outline |

Introduction: Attention Step

Main Point #1: Need Step

Main Point #2: Satisfaction Step

Main Point #3: Visualization Step

Conclusoin: Action Step

Problem-Cause-Solution

Another format for organizing a persuasive speech is the problem-cause-solution format. In this specific format, you discuss what a problem is, what you believe is causing the problem, and then what the solution should be to correct the problem.

Specific Purpose:  To persuade my classroom peers that our campus should adopt a zero-tolerance policy for hate speech.

  • Demonstrate that there is distrust among different groups on campus that has led to unnecessary confrontations and violence.
  • Show that the confrontations and violence are a result of hate speech that occurred prior to the events.
  • Explain how instituting a campus-wide zero-tolerance policy against hate speech could stop the unnecessary confrontations and violence.

In this speech, you want to persuade people to support a new campus-wide policy calling for zero-tolerance of hate speech. Once you have shown the problem, you then explain to your audience that the cause of the unnecessary confrontations and violence is prior incidents of hate speech. Lastly, you argue that a campus-wide zero-tolerance policy could help prevent future unnecessary confrontations and violence. Again, this method of organizing a speech is as simple as its name: problem-cause-solution.

Comparative Advantages

The final method for organizing a persuasive speech is called the comparative advantages speech format. The goal of this speech is to compare items side-by-side and show why one of them is more advantageous than the other. For example, let’s say that you’re giving a speech on which e-book reader is better: Amazon.com’s Kindle or Barnes and Nobles’ Nook. Here’s how you could organize this speech:

Specific Purpose:  To persuade my audience that the Nook is more advantageous than the Kindle.

  • The Nook allows owners to trade and loan books to other owners or people who have downloaded the Nook software, while the Kindle does not.
  • The Nook has a color-touch screen, while the Kindle’s screen is black and grey and noninteractive.
  • The Nook’s memory can be expanded through microSD, while the Kindle’s memory cannot be upgraded.

As you can see from this speech’s organization, the simple goal of this speech is to show why one thing has more positives than something else. Obviously, when you are demonstrating comparative advantages, the items you are comparing need to be functional equivalents—or, as the saying goes, you cannot compare apples to oranges.

Key Takeaways

  • There are three common patterns that persuaders can utilize to help organize their speeches effectively: Monroe’s motivated sequence, problem-cause-solution, and comparative advantage. Each of these patterns can effectively help a speaker think through his or her thoughts and organize them in a manner that will be more likely to persuade an audience.
  • Alan H. Monroe’s (1935) motivated sequence is a commonly used speech format that is used by many people to effectively organize persuasive messages. The pattern consists of five basic stages: attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action. In the first stage, a speaker gets an audience’s attention. In the second stage, the speaker shows an audience that a need exists. In the third stage, the speaker shows how his or her persuasive proposal could satisfy the need. The fourth stage shows how the future could be if the persuasive proposal is or is not adopted. Lastly, the speaker urges the audience to take some kind of action to help enact the speaker’s persuasive proposal.
  • The problem-cause-solution proposal is a three-pronged speech pattern. The speaker starts by explaining the problem the speaker sees. The speaker then explains what he or she sees as the underlying causes of the problem. Lastly, the speaker proposes a solution to the problem that corrects the underlying causes.
  • The comparative advantages speech format is utilized when a speaker is comparing two or more things or ideas and shows why one of the things or ideas has more advantages than the other(s).

German, K. M., Gronbeck, B. E., Ehninger, D., & Monroe, A. H. (2010). Principles of public speaking  (17th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon, p. 236.

Micciche, T., Pryor, B., & Butler, J. (2000). A test of Monroe’s motivated sequence for its effects on ratings of message organization and attitude change.  Psychological Reports, 86 , 1135–1138.

Monroe, A. H. (1935).  Principles and types of speech . Chicago, IL: Scott Foresman.

Public Speaking Copyright © by Dr. Layne Goodman; Amber Green, M.A.; and Various is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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COMMENTS

  1. Problem-Solution Speech [Topics, Outline, Examples]

    Thesis Statement: The thesis typically lays out the problem and solution in the form of a question and answer. See examples below. Solution: Explain the solution clearly and in detail, your problem-solving strategy, and reasons why your solution will work.In this section, be sure to answer common objections, such as "there is a better solution," "your solution is too costly," and ...

  2. 80+ Problem Solution Speech Topics

    A problem/solution speech takes the approach of highlighting an issue with the intent to provide solutions. It is a two-phase approach where first the speaker lays out the problem and explains the importance. Secondly, a variety of solutions are provided to tackle the said issue. The best solutions are those that can be actively applied.

  3. Problem Solution Speech Topics, Outline & Examples

    Here are some tips to keep in mind as you prepare your problem-solution speech: Be passionate: This is not the time for a dry, academic approach. You need to be enthusiastic about the issue at hand and really sell your audience on why they should care. Be clear: Make sure that your audience understands the problem and potential solutions.

  4. 17.3 Organizing Persuasive Speeches

    The problem-cause-solution proposal is a three-pronged speech pattern. The speaker starts by explaining the problem the speaker sees. The speaker then explains what he or she sees as the underlying causes of the problem. Lastly, the speaker proposes a solution to the problem that corrects the underlying causes.

  5. 70 Custom Problem Solution Speech Topics On Each Subject

    Problem solution speech requires comprehensive preparation. You should create an outline, pick up a relevant topic, and rehearse it. Follow our step-by-step guide to find a suitable topic and improve your speech. Keep in mind we have other articles on how to write different types of essays or texts for speech. Stay self-confident, and you will ...

  6. 10.2 Using Common Organizing Patterns

    Problem-Cause-Solution. Another format for organizing distinct main points in a clear manner is the problem-cause-solution speech pattern. In this format you describe a problem, identify what you believe is causing the problem, and then recommend a solution to correct the problem.

  7. Problem Solution Speech Topics Ideas: Guide to Successful Writing

    The problem solution speech topics that you will find below will help you choose, identify, and organize the way of presenting your essay. As you select the topic, you will research it properly in order to persuade the audience that a particular problem exists and that it is possible to come up with solutions to it. Moreover, you will learn how ...

  8. How to Persuade Your Audience with Problem-Solution Speeches

    A successful speech influences or persuades others to take action or to adopt an idea. The problem-solution structure is a simple and logical framework you can adopt to raise awareness to a ...

  9. Problem Solution Speech Topics

    Problem Solution Speech Topics. When working with problem solution speech topics there are two main objectives to consider: to present convincing solutions. The requirement to fix the problem defines the problem-solution speech as a persuasive presentation. You may consider any of the persuasive speech topics that you have a proposal or a plan ...

  10. Organizational Styles

    The problem-solution speech is especially appropriate when the speaker desires to promote a particular solution as this offers audience members a way to become involved. Whether you are able to offer a specific solution or not, key to the problem-solution speech is a clear description of both the problem and the solution with clear links drawn ...

  11. PDF PROBLEM-SOLUTION SPEECH TEMPLATE Title

    PROBLEM-SOLUTION SPEECH TEMPLATE Title: Topic: General Purpose: "To Inform", "To Persuade", "To Entertain", etc … as assigned Specific Purpose: A single statement that combines your general purpose, your audience, and your intended outcome (the outcome or behavior you want your audience to experience or adopt after

  12. Patterns of Organization: Persuasive Speeches

    Problem-Cause-Solution Pattern. A variation of the problem-solution pattern, and one that sometimes re- quires more in-depth exploration of an issue, is the "problem-cause-solution" pattern. If you were giving a speech on future extinction of certain animal species, it would be insufficient to just explain that numbers of species are about ...

  13. Structure of a Persuasive Speech

    In many ways, a persuasive speech is structured like an informative speech. It has an introduction with an attention-getter and a clear thesis statement. ... Problem-solution: With this organizational pattern, you provide two main points. The first main point focuses on a problem that exists and the second details your proposed solution to the ...

  14. Problem Solution Persuasive Speech Topics

    Below are thirty problem solution persuasive speech topics to help you get started. 1. The problems with plastic surgery and how to fix them. 2. The rise of eating disorders and what can be done about it. 3. Why there needs to be more education on mental health and how to prevent suicide. 4.

  15. 8.3: Organizational Styles

    problem-solution. Sometimes it is necessary to share a problem and a solution with an audience. In cases like these, the problem-solution speech is an appropriate way to arrange the main points of a speech. One familiar example of speeches organized in this way is the political speeches that presidential hopefuls give in the United States.

  16. Organizing Persuasive Speeches

    The problem-cause-solution proposal is a three-pronged speech pattern. The speaker starts by explaining the problem the speaker sees. The speaker then explains what he or she sees as the underlying causes of the problem. Lastly, the speaker proposes a solution to the problem that corrects the underlying causes.

  17. Problem-Solution Speech Topics, Structure, & Examples [2024]

    Problem Cause Solution Speech Topics. Problem-cause-solution speech is a very effective way to persuade your audience that you are a reliable expert. It requires you to analyze the causes of the issue in detail and come up with the best solution! The leading causes of binge drinking on college campuses and the ways to eliminate it.

  18. 80+ Problem Solution Speech Topics

    A problem/solution speech takes the approaching of highlighting an issue with the intent to provide solutions. It is a two-phase get where first the speaker lays out who problem and declared the importance. Secondly, a variety of solve are provided the undertake the said matter. The supreme solutions are those that can be actives applied.

  19. Teaching Problem and Solution in Speech

    When determining the solution or solutions to the problem in the text, students can work on the following speech skills: Articulation by answering these questions and talking through the solutions orally. Receptive language skills like answering questions by writing down, highlighting, or circling the solutions to the problem.

  20. Problem-Solution vs Cause-Effect Speeches: How to Choose

    The problem-solution speech has two main parts: the problem and the solution. In the problem part, you need to describe the problem, explain why it is important, and show how it affects your audience.

  21. 7.3 Organizational Patterns of Arrangement

    These are referred to as organizational patterns for arranging your main points in a speech. The chronological (or temporal), topical, spatial, or causal patterns may be better suited to informative speeches, whereas the Problem-Solution, Monroe's Motivated Sequence (Monroe, 1949), Claim-to-Proof (Mudd & Sillar, 1962), or Refutation pattern ...

  22. Understanding the Role of Speech Therapy in Problem Solving Development

    A. Definition and Purpose of Speech Therapy. Speech therapy, also known as speech-language therapy, is a specialized form of therapy that focuses on assessing, diagnosing, and treating communication disorders. The primary goal of speech therapy is to improve an individual's ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and non-verbally.

  23. Biden left without an easy solution as campus protests heat up

    Biden to speak on antisemitism next week Jean-Pierre said Biden would deliver the keynote address next week at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum's annual days of remembrance ceremony on May 7 ...

  24. Monroe's Motivated Sequence, Problem-Solution, Comparative Advantages

    The problem-cause-solution proposal is a three-pronged speech pattern. The speaker starts by explaining the problem the speaker sees. The speaker then explains what he or she sees as the underlying causes of the problem. Lastly, the speaker proposes a solution to the problem that corrects the underlying causes.