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Mastering the Phrase: How to Say Homework in Japanese

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Are you looking to expand your Japanese language skills? Learning how to express academic tasks like “homework” in Japanese is a great place to start. In this section, we will guide you through the different ways to say “homework” in Japanese, providing you with the necessary tools to communicate more effectively in the language.

Although it may seem simple, expressing “homework” in Japanese is not as straightforward as you may think. Japanese has multiple words and expressions for this concept, depending on the context and level of formality. But fear not! By the end of this article, you will know how to say “homework” in Japanese like a pro.

So, are you ready to learn the Japanese word for homework and other relevant phrases? Let’s get started!

How to Say Homework in Japanese

When it comes to expressing the concept of homework in Japanese, there are various phrases and expressions you can use. Here are some common ways to say “homework” in Japanese:

Note that the word “宿題” (shukudai) is the most commonly used term for “homework” in Japanese. However, the other phrases can also be used depending on the context and level of formality.

How to Say Homework in Japanese in Different Contexts

Depending on the situation, the appropriate Japanese phrase for “homework” may vary. Here are some examples:

  • If you want to ask your teacher about the homework: 「今日の宿題は何ですか?」(Kyou no shukudai wa nan desu ka?) which means “What is today’s homework?”
  • If you want to tell a friend that you have homework to do: 「宿題があるんだよ」(Shukudai ga aru n da yo) which means “I have homework to do.”
  • If you want to express that the homework is difficult: 「宿題が難しいです」(Shukudai ga muzukashii desu) which means “The homework is difficult.”

By using these phrases in the appropriate context, you can effectively communicate about homework in Japanese.

Japanese Vocabulary for Homework

As mentioned earlier, the Japanese language has multiple words and expressions for “homework”, depending on the context and level of formality. Here are some of the most commonly used vocabulary words and phrases related to homework in Japanese:

It’s important to note that the pronunciation of each word and phrase can vary depending on the speaker’s region and dialect, so it’s best to listen to native speakers for proper pronunciation.

Homework Phrase in Japanese

The most commonly used phrase for “homework” in Japanese is “shukudai” (宿題), which is also the most casual and familiar. For a more formal or academic context, “kadai” (課題) can be used instead.

In addition to these phrases, Japanese educators may use the term “jishu gakushu” (自主学習) when referring to self-study or homework outside of class. Students may also use the phrases “yoshu” (予習) for preparing for a lesson and “fukushu” (復習) for reviewing material covered in class or for exams.

By familiarizing yourself with these vocabulary words and phrases, you can accurately express and discuss homework in Japanese conversations.

Ways to Express Homework in Japanese

Japanese has multiple words and expressions for “homework” depending on the context and level of formality. Here are some common ways to express homework in Japanese :

In addition to the words listed above, there are also many expressions commonly used to talk about homework in Japanese. Here are some examples:

  • しゅくだいのりょうがおおい
  • The amount of homework is large
  • まいばんしゅくだいをする
  • To do homework every night
  • しゅくだいをほうちする
  • To leave homework undone

By learning these variations for expressing homework in Japanese, you can showcase your language prowess and effectively communicate about academic tasks in various contexts.

Pronunciation and Usage Tips

Now that you know how to say homework in Japanese and have familiarized yourself with the related vocabulary and expressions, it’s important to understand how to pronounce these phrases correctly.

The Japanese word for homework is しゅくだい (shukudai). To pronounce it correctly, begin with the “shu” sound, which is similar to the English “shoe” sound, but with a slightly shorter duration. Next, move on to the “ku” sound, which is similar to the English “koo” sound. Finally, say “dai” with a long “i” sound, similar to the English word “die.”

Another word commonly used for homework in Japanese is 宿題 (shukudai). To pronounce this word, start with “shu” as before, then say “ku” and “dai” as you did previously. The final syllable “kai” is pronounced with a long “i” sound as in the English word “high.”

It’s important to note that Japanese has different levels of politeness and formality, and the appropriate word choice and expressions will depend on the context and situation. For example, if you want to ask a friend if they have any homework, you might use the phrase “shukudai aru?” which means “Do you have homework?” In a more formal setting, you may use “shukudai ga arimasu ka?” which has the same meaning, but with a higher level of politeness.

By paying attention to pronunciation and using the appropriate level of formality, you can effectively communicate about homework in Japanese. Keep practicing and soon you’ll be a master of the phrase!

Summary and Conclusion

In conclusion, learning the various ways to express “homework” in Japanese is an essential part of mastering the language. The Japanese language has multiple words for homework, and it’s important to understand the context and level of formality when choosing which phrase to use.

By familiarizing yourself with the specific vocabulary and expressions related to homework in Japanese, you can effectively communicate about academic tasks in various contexts. Additionally, understanding the correct pronunciation of these phrases will enhance your language skills and improve your overall communication in Japanese.

We hope this article has provided you with valuable insights into the different ways to say “homework” in Japanese and has helped you improve your language proficiency. Remember to practice and use these phrases in your Japanese conversations to further enhance your skills!

Q: How do you say “homework” in Japanese?

A: The word for “homework” in Japanese is “宿題” (しゅくだい, shukudai).

Q: Are there any other ways to express “homework” in Japanese?

A: Yes, besides “宿題” (しゅくだい, shukudai), you can also use the phrases “宿題をする” (しゅくだいをする, shukudai o suru) which means “to do homework,” or “宿題を出す” (しゅくだいをだす, shukudai o dasu) which means “to assign homework.”

Q: How do you pronounce “宿題”?

A: “宿題” (しゅくだい, shukudai) is pronounced as “shoo-koo-die” in English.

Q: Can you provide an example sentence using the word “宿題”?

A: Sure! An example sentence could be “毎晩、宿題をします” (まいばん、しゅくだいをします, Maiban, shukudai o shimasu) which means “I do homework every night.”

Q: Are there any other words or phrases related to homework in Japanese?

A: Yes, some related words and phrases include “テストの勉強” (てすとのべんきょう, tesuto no benkyou) for “studying for a test” and “レポートを書く” (れぽーとをかく, repooto o kaku) for “writing a report.”

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May 28, 2022 By Masaki Mori Leave a Comment

Shukudai is the Japanese word for ‘homework’, explained

What does “shukudai” mean in japanese.

Native speakers use shukudai to mean ‘homework’ in Japanese. Perhaps, some Japanese learners know this word as it is sometimes used in Japanese textbooks. In this blog post, however, I will explain this word in detail based on its kanji expression. And also, I will explain how to use it through example sentences. My explanations would help Japanese learners understand shukudai more clearly. Then, let’s get started!

Definition and meaning of “shukudai”

How to say “homework” in japanese, another example of “shukudai”.

Let me start with the definition and meaning of shukudai .

  • shukudai – 宿題 (しゅくだい) : a noun meaning ‘homework’ in Japanese.

Native speakers use this noun to refer to a task or tasks to do at home after school. So, the usage is very similar to that of the English noun, homework , I think.

The definition and meaning are simple and clear. To understand this noun more clearly, however, let me explain its kanji characters in detail, one by one.

Shukudai in kanji

The kanji expression of shukudai consists of the following two kanji characters:

  • 宿 : a kanji character used to refer to a place where people stay.
  • 題 : a kanji character used to mean a ‘theme’, ‘subject’, ‘question’, or ‘problem’ in Japanese.

From these two kanji characters, we can understand that shukudai literally means ‘a place where people stay and questions’ in Japanese. This literal interpretation is not completely in line with the actual meaning, but still understandable, I think. Homework is often a set of questions which people need to solve at home.

When we meet new kanji expressions, we should check their kanji characters in detail to understand their meanings clearly and deeply. In many cases, kanji characters tell us a lot about the meanings of the expressions they form. Actually, here, we could get the better understanding of shukudai through the detailed kanji check above.

So far, I’ve explained the definition and meaning of shukudai together with its kanji characters. Then, let me explain how to use it through the example sentences below.

kyou wa shukudai ga takusan aru – 今日は宿題がたくさんある (きょうはしゅくだいがたくさんある) Today, I have a lot of homework.

Below are the new words used in the example sentence.

  • kyou – 今日 (きょう) : a noun meaning ‘today’ in Japanese.
  • wa – は : a binding particle working as a case marker or topic marker. In the example, this works as a topic marker after kyou to put a focus on it.
  • ga – が : a case particle used to make the subject word or the object word in a sentence. In the example, this is used after shukudai to make the subject in the sentence.
  • takusan – たくさん : an adverb of quantity meaning ‘many’, ‘much’, or such in Japanese. In the example, this works to emphasize the amount of the homework.
  • aru – ある : a verb meaning ‘to be’, ‘to exist’, ‘to present’, or such in Japanese.

This is a typical usage of shukudai . In this example, it works as a part of the commonly-used phrase, shukudai ga aru , which literally means ‘homework exists’ in Japanese. This phrase is often translated into English as ‘to have homework’, though.

boku wa shukudai wo katazuke mashi ta – 僕は宿題を片付けました (ぼくはしゅくだいをかたづけました) I finished my homework.

  • boku – 僕 (ぼく) : a pronoun meaning ‘I’ in Japanese. This is used mainly by boys and young males.
  • wo – を : a case particle used to make the object word in a sentence. In the example, this is used after shukudai to make the object in the sentence.
  • katazuke – 片付け (かたづけ) : one conjugation of the verb, katazukeru , which means ‘to clean’, ‘to clear’, ‘to finish’, or such in Japanese. In the example, it has been conjugated for the better connection with its following word.
  • mashi – まし : one conjugation of the auxiliary verb, masu , which is used after a verb to make it polite. In the example, this is used after katazuke to make it sound polite.
  • ta – た : an auxiliary verb used after a verb, adjective, or auxiliary verb to make its past tense form. Probably, this is well known as a part of Japanese ta form. In the example, this is used at the end of the verb phrase to mean ‘to have finished’ in Japanese.

This is another example of shukudai . In this example, it works together with the case particle, wo , to become the object in the sentence. When we want to mean ‘homework’ in Japanese, anyway, this noun is always a very good option.

In this blog post, I’ve explained the definition and meaning of shukudai in detail based on its kanji expression. And also, I’ve explained how to use it through the example sentences. Let me summarize them as follows.

  • shukudai – 宿題 (しゅくだい) : a noun meaning ‘homework’ in Japanese. Native speakers use this noun to refer to a task or tasks to do at home after school. So, the usage of this noun is very similar to that of the English one, homework . These two kanji characters literally mean ‘a place where people stay and questions’ in Japanese. This literal interpretation is not completely in line with the actual meaning, but still understandable, I think. Homework is often a set of questions which people need to solve at home.

Hope my explanations are understandable and helpful for Japanese learners.

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What is the translation of "homework" in Japanese?

"homework" in japanese, homework {noun}, homeworking scheme {noun}, translations, monolingual examples, english how to use "homework" in a sentence.

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Synonyms (English) for "homework":

  • preparation
  • homeroom activities
  • homeroom teacher
  • homesickness
  • homestretch
  • homeward voyage or flight
  • homeworking scheme
  • homicidal maniac
  • homicide department
  • homing instinct
  • homing torpedo
  • homochromatic

Translations into more languages in the bab.la Spanish-English dictionary .

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RomajiDesu - Japanese Dictionary & Translator!

Meaning of homework in Japanese

Definition of homework.

  • ( n ) homework

課題 Kanji Details

課題を変えてみたらどうだろう。 Suppose we change the subject.

  • homework ; assignment
  • task; challenge; problem; question

宿題 Kanji Details

今日は宿題が無い。 I have no homework today.

Words related to homework

内職商法 Kanji Details

  • ( n ) homework ing scheme (scam)

△ Kanji Details

  • ( n ) average (e.g. as a mark for homework ); weak →Related words: 三角

机向 Kanji Details

  • ( exp , v5u ) to sit at a desk (to study); to set to work on revision, homework , etc.

答合 Kanji Details

  • ( n ) checking answers (e.g. to homework problems); verifying one's answers

Sentences containing homework

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How to Say Homework in Japanese Hiragana

Learning a new language involves not only memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules but also understanding various aspects of its culture. As you dive into the Japanese language, it’s important to acquire everyday vocabulary that includes terms like “homework.” In Japanese, the word for homework can be expressed using hiragana, one of the three main scripts used in writing. This guide will provide you with the formal and informal ways to say homework in Japanese and offer several tips and examples to assist your learning journey.

1. The Formal Way: 宿題 (しゅくだい)

In formal situations, such as when talking to your teachers or superiors, the appropriate term for homework in Japanese is “宿題” (しゅくだい). This word is written using kanji characters but can also be expressed in hiragana as “しゅくだい.” The pronunciation remains the same, but it emphasizes the formal and polite context.

Example: 先生、宿題を提出しました。(Sensei, shukudai o teishutsu shimashita.) Translation: Teacher, I have submitted my homework.

2. The Informal Way: テスト (てすと)

In informal and casual conversations with friends or peers, the Japanese language often adopts loanwords from English. In this context, the word “homework” is commonly replaced with the borrowed term “テスト” (てすと), which directly translates to “test” in English but is used more broadly to refer to homework as well.

Example: 明日、てすとがたくさんあるよ。(Ashita, tesuto ga takusan aru yo.) Translation: I have a lot of homework tomorrow.

These informal expressions can be used comfortably among friends or when in casual settings, but it’s essential to be mindful of your audience and the level of politeness required in the given situation.

3. Additional Regional Variations

In addition to the formal and informal ways mentioned above, regional variations exist within Japan. While these may not typically be used in everyday conversation, it’s useful to be aware of them to deepen your understanding of the language’s diversity. Here are a few regional variations for the word homework:

  • 関東 (かんとう) Variation: テツド (てつど) This variation is used in the Kanto region, which includes major cities like Tokyo. The pronunciation “テツド” represents the word “宿題” (しゅくだい) in hiragana form.
  • 九州 (きゅうしゅう) Variation: モド (もど) People in the Kyushu region, located in southwestern Japan, may use the term “モド” (もど) for homework instead of the more standard expressions.

4. Tips for Learning Vocabulary

Building vocabulary skills is crucial when learning any language, including Japanese. Here are some tips to help you effectively learn and reinforce new words:

  • Create Flashcards: Write the Japanese term for homework on one side of the flashcard and its English translation on the other. Test yourself regularly to enhance memorization.
  • Use Mnemonics: Conjure up mental images or associate the word “しゅくだい” or other variations with something memorable. For example, you could imagine a school bus that transports homework instead of students.
  • Practice with Native Speakers: Engage in language exchange programs or find Japanese language partners to practice speaking and using new vocabulary in conversations.
  • Immerse Yourself: Surround yourself with Japanese media, such as anime or dramas, and actively listen for vocabulary in context. This exposure helps reinforce your understanding of how words are used.

Congratulations on taking the initiative to learn how to say “homework” in Japanese using hiragana! Remember that “宿題” (しゅくだい) is the formal term, while “テスト” (てすと) represents the more informal way to refer to homework, even though it directly translates to “test” in English. Be mindful of the context and level of politeness required in various situations.

Additionally, knowing regional variations, such as the Kanto region’s “テツド” (てつど) and the Kyushu region’s “モド” (もど), can deepen your understanding of the language’s diversity.

Remember to employ effective vocabulary learning techniques, such as flashcards, mnemonics, conversation practice, and language immersion, to reinforce new words and concepts effectively.

Enjoy your journey of learning the Japanese language and discovering its rich cultural heritage!

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Common Japanese Words and Phrases Used in Classroom

what is homework in japanese

The language used in a classroom setting will differ depending on whether you are a student or teacher, and whether you are talking to other students or teachers. To sort this all out, let’s first go over the basics. What do I call my teacher? How do I ask questions during the class? How do I reply during the roll call? By going through the common vocabulary and phrases first, you will be able to then modify and arrange them to communicate smoothly with your peers and teachers.

Whether you’re studying in a Japanese language school as a foreign student, taking Japanese group lessons online or in-person, or teaching in a Japanese school, we will help nail down key Japanese vocabulary and phrases for the classroom. 

Essential Japanese Vocabulary Related to School: Classroom, Teacher, and Student in Japanese

Before we go into the common Japanese phrases used in a class, let’s take a look at what class and classroom are in Japanese. You may be familiar with jugyou (授業), kyoushitsu (教室), sensei (先生), and gakusei (学生), the general terms for the lesson, classroom, teacher, and student in Japanese, but other terms may be used depending on the circumstance.

Jugyou (授業) is an umbrella term for the lesson and refers to any format of the lesson where students learn from teachers. It is commonly used in high school and below, as well as language schools, but can be used for any lesson in an educational institution. Kougi (講義), which is the term for a lecture in Japanese, is a specific type of jugyou where teachers talk in front of a group of students at their desks. It is commonly used in universities or other tertiary educational institutions, This can also be referred to as zagaku (座学), which basically means education received while sitting at a desk.

Kyoushitsu (教室) is the general term for classrooms and is the most common one used in any setting. However, those in universities or other tertiary education may also hear the term kougishitsu (講義室), meaning lecture hall.

Sensei (先生) is the most common way to refer to any teacher of any kind, in schools, other academic institutions, and even extracurricular activities. Until high school, the terms kyouin (教員) and kyoushi (教師), which both mean teacher, are commonly used to refer to a teaching position or title. On the other hand, teachers in universities will have different titles depending on their rank, such as koushi (講師), junkyouju (准教授), and kyouju (教授), which mean lecturer, associate professor, and professor respectively. In all cases, sensei (先生) is still the most common and appropriate way to refer to educators, but knowing the different classifications will come in handy especially if you are a university student or are teaching in Japan.

Students are generally referred to as one of the following: gakusei (学生) or seito (生徒). In legal terms, the former is used for students receiving higher education such as in universities or vocational schools, whereas the latter is used for junior high to high school students. The two are used interchangeably in daily conversation, however, there is a tendency to use gakusei (学生) when talking about students generally, and seito (生徒) when talking about students of a specific institution or under a specific teacher.

Japanese Expressions for Greeting in a Class 

As with all other interactions, classes start and end with greetings. Students may greet each other formally in keigo (敬語) or informally in tameguchi (タメ口), but interactions between students and teachers are almost always in keigo (敬語).

At the start of the class, the sensei (先生) usually greets students using the greeting appropriate for the time of the day, with either ohayougozaimasu (おはようございます): good morning, konnichiwa (こんにちは): hello, or konbanwa (こんばんは): good evening. Some may even follow this with yoroshikuonegaishimasu (よろしくお願いします), which is loosely translated to ‘please treat me favorably’ in English. Check out our guide on basic Japanese greetings and phrases.

The class usually ends with arigatougozaimashita (ありがとうございました) to thank the students, and sometimes with otsukare sama deshita (お疲れ様でした) to acknowledge the students’ hard work during the class. Some teachers may also use goseichou arigatougozaimashita (ご清聴ありがとうございました), which takes a step further to thank students for listening quietly. This phrase is often used after presentations by students as well.

Japanese Phrases in Classroom for Taking Attendance

Attendance is shusseki (出席) in Japanese, with its kanji meaning to be in your seat. Therefore the Japanese for absence is kesseki (欠席), to be absent from your seat. Depending on the school, teachers may take attendance through roll calls, paper slips, or online.

A roll call, called tenko (点呼) in Japanese, but typically, the teacher will usually proceed in the following way:

出席を取ります。Aさん。 Shusseki o torimasu. A-san. I will be taking roll call (attendance). A-san.

If Person A is present, they would simply respond by saying yes with hai (はい). This will repeat until everyone is called. If you will be absent, it’s best to notify the teacher or staff by email beforehand for it to be an excused absence or kounin kesseki (公認欠席). Unexcused absences, or mudan kesseki (無断欠席), are commonly frowned upon and may even lead to consequences. Here is an example of how to notify your absence through email.

EMAIL for absence not attending class in japanese

​​件名:本日の(授業名)を欠席します(名前) kenmei : honjitsu no (jugyoumei) o kesseki shimasu (namae) Subject : I will be absent from today’s (class name) (name)

〇〇先生 〇〇sensei   〇〇 teacher

お世話になっております。 osewa ni natte orimasu. *Loosely translated to Thank you for your assistance.

(名前と学籍番号)と申します。 (namae to gakuseki bangou) to moushimasu. I am (name and student number)

昨日から熱があるので、本日の(授業名)は欠席させていただきたいと思います。 kinou kara netsu ga aru node, honjitsu no (jugyoumei) wa kesseki sasete itadakitai to omoimasu. I’ve had a fever since yesterday, so I would like to be absent from today’s class.

本日の課題を後日取りにうかがってもよろしいでしょうか。 honjitsu no kadai o gojitsu torini ukagattemo yoroshiideshouka. May I pick up my assignment for today’s class at a later date?

よろしくお願いします。 yoroshiku onegaishimasu. *Loosely translated to thank you in advance.

(名前と学籍番号) (namae to gakuseki bangou) (name and student number)

Interestingly, there is a term for faking someone’s attendance in Japanese, called daihen (代返). It comes from 代 わりに 返 事する (kawarini henji suru) , meaning to respond in place of someone else during roll call. This is strongly prohibited in all schools, so be careful not to do this!

Japanese Phrases in Classroom: Listening to Instructions

Apart from sitting and listening to your teacher’s jugyou (授業), you may have other tasks to complete such as answering questions or solving a quiz, reading something for the class, or having class discussions. In these cases, you will most likely hear the command for the task in a Verb ~て + ください (verb ~te + kudasai) form.

For example:

答えてください kotaete kudasai Please answer.

解答してください kaitoushite kudasai. Please answer. (Used in written form)

話し合ってください hanashiatte kudasai. Please discuss.

読んでください yonde kudasai.   Please read.

手を挙げて Te o agete. Please raise your hand.

Your teacher usually instructs the last example in the class. If you want to say or ask anything, we should avoid disrupting the flow of the lesson. Raising your hand allows the teacher to decide if it’s the best time to address your concern in the class at the moment.

Take a look at this blog post to learn other ways kudasai (ください) is used , and this blog post for how to conjugate verbs into the ~te (~て) form.

How to Ask Questions in a Class in Japanese

Some teachers prefer students to ask questions during class, but others may prefer for students to ask all their questions at the end of the lesson. If you have a question during class, raise your hand and ask your question! Teachers may also ask:

ここまで何か質問はありますか? kokomade nanika shitsumon wa arimasuka? Are there any questions so far?

Outside of class, students can find the opportunity to talk to the teacher in the time between classes called jugyou no aima (授業の合間), or during office hours, or ofisu awa a (オフィスアワー). When you go up to the teacher, here are some examples of how you can start the conversation:

〇〇先生、今お時間よろしいでしょうか? 〇〇sensei, ima ojikan yoroshii deshouka? Teacher 〇〇, may I have a moment?

本日の授業について質問があります。 honjitsu no jugyou ni tsuite shitsumon ga arimasu. I have a question about today’s class.

Japanese Phrases in Classroom: Homework and Assignments in Japanese

Although many may dread the idea of homework, it’s a must-know when learning Japanese in the classroom. Assignments including homework are called kadai (課題), which can also mean ‘issue that needs to be solved’. The word to use for homework specifically is shukudai (宿題), with its kanji referring literally to work that is completed at home.

Teachers will also provide students with information about submission or teishutsu (提出), including the due date, which is kigen (期限) or shimekiri (締め切り). 

Let’s put all the vocabulary together in some example sentences:

宿題を出します。 shukudai o dashimasu. I will be giving out homework.

これについてのレポートを来週までの課題にします。 kore ni tsuite no repooto o raishuu madeno kadai ni shimasu. The assignment until next week will be a report about this topic.

ちゃんと期限までに終わらせて提出してください。 chanto kigen made ni owarasete teishutsu shite kudasai. Make sure to finish and submit it before the due date.

この課題の締め切りは来週の火曜日です。 kono kadai no shimekiri wa raishuu no kayoubi desu. The due date for this assignment is next Tuesday.

Whether you are taking a Japanese class or you want to teach at a Japanese local school and/or study with native students, knowing Japanese classroom phrases and vocabulary ahead will make your school life easier. On top of the basic terminology of lesson, classroom, teacher, and student, learning other common phrases will allow you to understand and communicate better with the rest of the class. Feel free to refer back to this guide for a free email sample for being absent from class, or vocabulary needed to remind your classmates about the due date of your assignment!

If you would like to learn more about the Japanese language, why not join a Japanese class at Coto Academy? We offer online and in-person courses , with a variety of free lessons designed to help you improve your Japanese speaking skill. 

Head to our contact page for a free level check and consultation !

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(Translation of homework from the Cambridge English–Japanese Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Translation of homework | GLOBAL English–Japanese Dictionary

(Translation of homework from the GLOBAL English-Japanese Dictionary © 2022 K Dictionaries Ltd)

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Translation of “homework” in Japanese

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How to say "I do my homework." in Japanese.

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what is homework in japanese

Do Japanese students get a lot of homework?

1. introduction.

Do Japanese students get a lot of homework? This is a question that has been asked for decades, and the answer is not always straightforward. In this article, we will explore the issue of homework in Japan from both a historical and modern perspective. We will look at how much homework Japanese students receive, what factors affect the amount of homework they receive, and the benefits and disadvantages of heavy homework loads for Japanese students. Finally, we will discuss the impact of technology on homework in Japan.

2. What is Homework?

Homework is defined as any academic assignment that is given to students outside of class time to be completed on their own. It can include reading assignments, writing essays or reports, solving problems, or conducting research. Homework is an important part of the learning process as it allows students to practice and reinforce concepts learned in class and prepare for upcoming lessons.

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3. Homework in Japan: A Historical Perspective

Homework has been a part of education in Japan since ancient times. In the Edo period (1603-1868), students were expected to complete their studies at home with the help of their parents or tutors. During this time, there was an emphasis on rote memorization and repetition rather than understanding concepts deeply. This approach continued into the Meiji period (1868-1912) when formal schooling became more widespread and textbooks were introduced into classrooms across Japan. The amount of homework assigned during this period was generally light compared to today’s standards; however, it still included some form of nightly practice or review work that was expected to be completed by all students.

4. How Much Homework Do Japanese Students Receive?

The amount of homework assigned to Japanese students varies greatly depending on grade level and school type (public vs private). According to recent surveys conducted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), elementary school children typically receive around 60 minutes per day while junior high schoolers receive around 100 minutes per day on average. High schoolers have even more with an average daily load ranging from 120-150 minutes per day depending on grade level and subject matter studied.

5. Factors That Affect the Amount of Homework Received by Japanese Students

There are several factors that can affect how much homework a student receives in Japan including grade level, school type (public vs private), subject matter studied (science vs humanities) as well as regional differences between prefectures/cities/towns within Japan itself due to differing educational philosophies between local governments/school boards etc.. Additionally, teachers’ expectations may also vary due to personal preferences or beliefs about how much work should be assigned each night/weekend etc..

6. Benefits and Disadvantages of Heavy Homework Loads for Japanese Students

Heavy homework loads can have both positive and negative effects on student learning outcomes in Japan depending on individual circumstances such as family support or access to resources like tutoring etc.. On one hand, having a lot of homework can help reinforce concepts learned in class while encouraging independent study habits which are beneficial for long term success in higher education or career pursuits after graduation from high school/university etc.. On the other hand however, too much work can lead to fatigue/burnout which can negatively impact concentration levels leading to lower grades overall if not managed properly over time etc..

7. The Impact of Technology on Homework in Japan

In recent years there has been an increased use of technology such as computers/tablets/smartphones etc., which has had both positive & negative impacts on traditional methods used for assigning & completing assignments such as essays & problem sets etc.. On one hand it has made it easier for teachers & administrators alike to distribute materials & track progress online but at same time it has led some educators & parents alike concerned about potential distractions posed by devices like smartphones which could potentially lead to lower academic performance if not managed properly over time etc..

8 Conclusion

In conclusion it is clear that Japanese students do indeed receive quite a bit more homework than their counterparts around world but this varies greatly depending on individual circumstances such as grade level & school type etc.. The amount & type assigned also depends heavily upon teacher expectations & regional differences between prefectures/cities within country itself but overall trend seems be increasing due introduction new technologies like computers/tablets which have made it easier assign tasks monitor progress online but also pose potential distractions if not managed properly over time etc..

9 References

1) Ministry Of Education Culture Sports Science And Technology “Survey Results On Hours Spent Doing Homework By Elementary Junior High And High School Students” Accessed April 15th 2021 https://www8.mext.go.jp /a_menu /shotou /toushin /1375705.htm 2) BBC News “Japan’s ‘Education Fever’ Is Making Children Ill” Accessed April 15th 2021 https://www.bbc.com /news /world -asia -39935337

How many hours do kids in Japan spend on homework?

On an average day Japanese high school students go to school from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm and depending on the school and the individual how immersed they are in exam hell. Many go to school diligently during the day and on weekends and are very involved in sports or club activities.

How many hours do Japanese students study in school?

School leaves around 3.15pm so they have to be at school about six and a half hours a day from Monday to Friday. However most children also go after school and many also go to doll schools (生书) in the evenings for extra study. Learn more about school life in Japan in our Getting to know the kids section.

How many hours do Japanese students work?

As a student you can work 28 hours a week. Its a combination of all the places you work so if you work two jobs for example you can only work 14 hours each. If you leave school because you dont want to carry out student-related activities your work permit will not be valid.

How many hours a week do Japanese students study?

FSI classes are 25 hours per week but students spend 3-4 hours per day on independent study outside of class time. Between class time and independent study students study about 395 hours per week.

What country has the shortest school day?

Finland Finland School Hours Typically, the Finnish school day starts anywhere from 9 to 9:45 a.m., and students typically spend only about five hours a day in the classroom. Whats more, Finnish students typically have little to no homework.

What country has the longest school hours?

Asian countries are known for their great education systems and exam schedules. All of Taiwan is notable for having the longest school hours which annoys some students while others find it necessary.

Related posts:

  • How many hours a day do Japanese students study?
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It Took Decades, but Japan’s Working Women Are Making Progress

Employers have taken steps to change a male-dominated workplace culture. But women still struggle to balance their careers with domestic obligations.

A person wears a pink smock to simulate being pregnant; a long pink cloth tube runs out of the smock and snakes on the ground. Another person stands nearby, holding a phone in one hand and placing the other hand on the simulated pregnant belly. Behind them, two people look down at baby dolls.

By Motoko Rich ,  Hisako Ueno and Kiuko Notoya

Reporting from Tokyo

When the future empress of Japan entered the country’s elite diplomatic corps in 1987, a year after a major equal employment law went into effect, she was one of only three female recruits. Known then as Masako Owada, she worked long hours and had a rising career as a trade negotiator. But she lasted just under six years in the job, giving it up to marry Crown Prince — and now Emperor — Naruhito.

Much has changed for Japan’s Foreign Ministry — and, in some ways, for Japanese women more broadly — in the ensuing three decades.

Since 2020, women have comprised nearly half of each entering class of diplomats, and many women continue their careers after they marry. These advances, in a country where women were predominantly hired only for clerical positions into the 1980s, show how the simple power of numbers can, however slowly, begin to remake workplace cultures and create a pipeline for leadership.

For years, Japan has promoted women in the workplace to aid its sputtering economy. Private-sector employers have taken some steps, like encouraging male employees to do more around the house, or setting limits on after-work outings that can complicate child care. But many women still struggle to balance their careers with domestic obligations.

The Foreign Ministry, led by a woman , Yoko Kamikawa, exceeds both other government agencies and familiar corporate names like Mitsubishi, Panasonic and SoftBank in an important sign of progress: its placement of women in career-track, professional jobs.

With more women in the ministry’s ranks, said Kotono Hara, a diplomat, “the way of working is drastically changing,” with more flexible hours and the option to work remotely.

Ms. Hara was one of only six women who joined the ministry in 2005. Last year, she was the event manager for a meeting of world leaders that Japan hosted in Hiroshima.

In the run-up to the Group of 7 summit, she worked in the office until 6:30 p.m. and then went home to feed and bathe her preschool-age child, before checking in with her team online later in the night. Earlier in her career, she assumed such a job was not the “kind of position that would be done by a mommy.”

Some of the progress for women at the Foreign Ministry has come as men from elite universities have turned instead to high-paying banking and consulting jobs, and educated women have come to see the public sector as appealing.

Yet as women move up in the diplomatic corps, they — like their counterparts at other employers — must juggle long working hours on top of shouldering the bulk of the duties on the home front .

Ministry staff members often work until 9 or 10 at night, and sometimes much later. Those hours tend to fall more heavily on women, said Shiori Kusuda, 29, who joined the ministry seven years ago and departed earlier this year for a consulting job in Tokyo.

Many of her male bosses at the Foreign Ministry, she said, went home to wives who took care of their meals and laundry, while her female colleagues completed domestic chores themselves. Men are encouraged to take paternity leave, but if they do, it is usually a matter of days or weeks.

Some parts of the culture have changed, Ms. Kusuda said — male colleagues proactively served her beer at after-work drinking sessions, rather than expecting her to serve them. But for women “who need to do their laundry or cooking after they go home, one hour of overtime work matters a lot,” Ms. Kusuda said.

In 2021, the latest year for which government statistics are available, married working women with children took on more than three-quarters of household chores . That load is compounded by the fact that Japanese employees, on average, work nearly 22 hours of overtime a month, according to a survey last year by Doda, a job-hunting website.

In many professions, additional hours are much higher, a reality that prompted the government to recently cap overtime at 45 hours a month .

Before the Equal Opportunity Employment Act went into effect in 1986, women were mostly hired for “ ochakumi ,” or “tea-serving,” jobs. Employers rarely recruited women for positions that could lead to executive, managerial or sales jobs.

Today, Japan is turning to women to cope with severe labor shortages. Still, while more than 80 percent of women ages 25 to 54 work, they account for just slightly more than a quarter of full-time, permanent employees. Only about one in eight managers are women, according to government data .

Some executives say women simply choose to limit their careers. Japanese women are “not as ambitious compared to women in the global market,” said Tetsu Yamaguchi, the director of global human resources for Fast Retailing, the clothing giant that owns Uniqlo. “Their priority is taking care of their child rather than developing their career.”

Worldwide, 45 percent of the company’s managers are women. In Japan, that proportion is just over a quarter.

Experts say the onus is on employers to make it easier for women to combine professional success and motherhood. Career barriers for women could hurt the broader economy, and as the nation’s birthrate dwindles , crushing expectations at work and at home can discourage ambitious women from having children.

At Sony, just one in nine of its managers in Japan are women. The company is taking small measures to support working mothers, such as offering courses for prospective fathers in which they are taught to change diapers and feed infants.

During a recent class at the company’s Tokyo headquarters, Satoko Sasaki, 35, who was seven months pregnant, watched her husband, Yudai, 29, a Sony software engineer, strap on a prosthetic belly simulating the physical sensations of pregnancy.

Ms. Sasaki, who works as an administrator at another company in Tokyo, said she was moved that her husband’s employer was trying to help men “understand my situation.”

At her own company, she said, tearing up, “I don’t have much support” from senior male colleagues.

Takayuki Kosaka, the course instructor, displayed a graph showing the time invested at home by a typical mother and father during the first 100 days of an infant’s life.

“The dad isn’t doing anything!” said Mr. Kosaka, pointing at a blue bar representing the father’s time working from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. “If he’s coming home at 11 p.m., doesn’t that mean that he also went out drinking?” he added.

After-work drinking parties with colleagues are all but obligatory at many Japanese companies, exacerbating the overwork culture. To curtail such commitments, Itochu, a conglomerate that owns the convenience store chain Family Mart among other businesses, mandates that all such parties end by 10 p.m. — still a time that makes child care difficult.

Rina Onishi, 24, who works at Itochu’s Tokyo headquarters, said she attended such parties three times a week. That is progress, she said: In the past, there were many more.

Drinking nights come on top of long days. The company now allows staff members to start working as early as 5 a.m., a policy intended in part to support parents who want to leave earlier. But many employees still work overtime. Ms. Onishi arrives at the office by 7:30 a.m. and typically stays until after 6 p.m.

Some women set limits on their work hours, even if it means forgoing promotions. Maiko Itagaki, 48, labored at a punishing pace as an advertising copywriter before landing in the hospital with a cerebral hemorrhage. After recovering, she married and gave birth to a son. But she was at the office when her mother called to tell her she had missed her son’s first steps.

“I thought, ‘Why am I working?’” Ms. Itagaki said.

She moved to a firm that conducts direct mail campaigns where she clocks in at 9 a.m. and out at 6 p.m. She declined a promotion to management. “I thought I would end up sacrificing my private time,” she said. “It felt like they just wanted me to do everything.”

At the Foreign Ministry, Hikariko Ono, Japan’s ambassador to Hungary, was the only woman out of 26 diplomats hired in 1988.

She postponed having a child out of fear that her bosses would think she did not take her career seriously. These days, she reminds younger female colleagues that if they want to have children, they are not alone.

“You can rely on the day-care center or your parents or friends,” she said. “Or even, of course, your husband.”

Motoko Rich is a reporter in Tokyo, leading coverage of Japan for The Times. More about Motoko Rich

Hisako Ueno is a reporter and researcher based in Tokyo, writing on Japanese politics, business, labor, gender and culture. More about Hisako Ueno

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COMMENTS

  1. Mastering the Phrase: How to Say Homework in Japanese

    The Japanese word for homework is しゅくだい (shukudai). To pronounce it correctly, begin with the "shu" sound, which is similar to the English "shoe" sound, but with a slightly shorter duration. Next, move on to the "ku" sound, which is similar to the English "koo" sound.

  2. How to Say Homework in Japanese: A Comprehensive Guide

    Shukudai: This is the most commonly used term for homework in Japanese. It is a straightforward and neutral word that can be used in any context. Gakushu Shukudai: By adding the word "gakushu" before "shukudai," you emphasize that it is a learning-related assignment. Kadai: "課題" is an alternative word for homework that is often ...

  3. Shukudai is the Japanese word for 'homework', explained

    shukudai - 宿題 (しゅくだい) : a noun meaning 'homework' in Japanese. Native speakers use this noun to refer to a task or tasks to do at home after school. So, the usage is very similar to that of the English noun, homework, I think. The definition and meaning are simple and clear.

  4. HOMEWORK in Japanese

    HOMEWORK translate: 宿題, 宿題(しゅくだい). Learn more in the Cambridge English-Japanese Dictionary.

  5. What is "Homework" in Japanese and how to say it?

    Learn Vietnamese. Learn the word for "Homework" and other related vocabulary in Japanese so that you can talk about Study Routine with confidence.

  6. Japanese translation of 'homework'

    Japanese Translation of "HOMEWORK" | The official Collins English-Japanese Dictionary online. Over 100,000 Japanese translations of English words and phrases.

  7. Translate "HOMEWORK" from English into Japanese

    ube Apr 17, 2024. English-Japanese translation of "HOMEWORK" | The official Collins English-Japanese Dictionary with over 100,000 Japanese translations.

  8. homework translation in Japanese

    English-Japanese dictionary. 宿題 n. Okay, that'll be homework. Perfect for summer homework and free research! 夏休みの 宿題 や自由研究にもぴったり!. 課題 n. At last, I finished this homework. 私はとうとうこの 課題 を終えた。. More translations in context: 下調べ n., homework, 予習 n. ...

  9. HOMEWORK

    homicide department. homing. homing instinct. homing torpedo. hommage. homo. homochromatic. Translations into more languages in the bab.la Spanish-English dictionary. Translation for 'homework' in the free English-Japanese dictionary and many other Japanese translations.

  10. How to say "Homework" in Japanese

    This video demonstrates "How to say Homework in Japanese"Talk with a native teacher on italki: https://foreignlanguage.center/italkiLearn Japnese with Japane...

  11. Meaning of homework in Japanese

    Definition of homework. ホームワーク hoomuwaaku. ( n) homework. かだい kadai 【 課題 】. 課題 Kanji Details. ( n) subject; theme; issue; matter. 課題を変えてみたらどうだろう。. Suppose we change the subject. homework; assignment.

  12. How to Say Homework in Japanese Hiragana

    1. The Formal Way: 宿題 (しゅくだい) In formal situations, such as when talking to your teachers or superiors, the appropriate term for homework in Japanese is "宿題" (しゅくだい). This word is written using kanji characters but can also be expressed in hiragana as "しゅくだい.". The pronunciation remains the same ...

  13. Japanese Meaning of 宿題 (しゅくだい) shukudai

    宿題 - Example Sentences 例文. Each example sentence includes a Japanese furigana reading, the romaji reading, and the English translation. Click the below red button to toggle off and and on all of the hints, and you can click on the buttons individually to show only the ones you want to see.

  14. Nihongo o Narau

    Lesson 10: I study every day. Click here for the kana version. The word for school is gakkou. Teachers are sensei and students are gakusei (or seito). College is daigaku (literally "big school"). A college student is daigakusei. In order to say what grade you are in, or whether you're a freshman-senior, you say "I'm a --year student."

  15. Common Japanese Words and Phrases Used in Classroom

    Japanese Phrases in Classroom: Homework and Assignments in Japanese. Although many may dread the idea of homework, it's a must-know when learning Japanese in the classroom. Assignments including homework are called kadai (課題), which can also mean 'issue that needs to be solved'.

  16. homework definition

    homework translations: 宿題, 宿題(しゅくだい). Learn more in the Cambridge English-Japanese Dictionary.

  17. How to say homework in Japanese

    What's the Japanese word for homework? Here's a list of translations. Japanese Translation. 宿題. Shukudai. More Japanese words for homework. 宿題 noun. Shukudai homework.

  18. Homework

    1 translation entry available: English: homework: Type: noun: Japanese: 宿題: Hiragana: しゅくだい: Pronunciation: shukudai: Example: Do my homework for me ...

  19. How to say "I do my homework." in Japanese.

    Japanese. You do your homework. あなたは宿題をします。. あなたは宿題をします。. He does his homework. 彼は宿題をします。. We do our homework. 私たちは宿題をします。. You all do your homework.

  20. Easy Japanese Learn Japanese

    Japan's public broadcaster, NHK, offers this fun and reliable Japanese language course to beginners. Download MP3 audio and PDF text lessons for free, and learn phrases you'll use right away.

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    This article explores the issue of homework in Japan from a historical and modern perspective. It looks at how much homework Japanese students receive, what factors affect the amount of homework they receive, and the benefits and disadvantages of heavy homework loads for Japanese students. Additionally, it discusses the impact of technology on homework in Japan, with an emphasis on potential ...

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    Japanese school education system consists of 12 years, out of which the first 9 years of education, from elementary school (6 years) to junior high school (3 years), is compulsory in Japan. After compulsory education, the next 3 years are for high school. In Japan, compulsory education starts at age six and ends at age fifteen at the end of ...

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