Case study: Indian Ocean, 2004

  • Electronics

1.3.5 Prediction, preparation and protection

2.1 components of an ecosystem.

  • On December 20, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake triggered a tsunami across the coastlines of the Indian Ocean
  • 1600 km of fault surface ruptured about 15 m along the subduction zone of the Indian plate under the Burma plate, displacing an estimated 30 cubic kilometres of water, sending is at 500 to 1000 km/h to the coast, where the wave reached heights of 30 m
  • The earthquake and tsunami were felt in Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and the Maldives
  • It is the most devastating tsunami in history
  • Over 200 thousand people died
  • 5 million people left homeless without adequate food, water or sanitation
  • In Indonesia, over 150 thousand people were killed, 30 thousand in Sri Lanka and 15 thousand in India
  • 410 houses destroyed
  • Local economies devastated, especially coastal fishing communities, where two-thirds of the infrastructure were destroyed
  • The earthquake & tsunami caused considerable damage to local ecosystems
  • 2 million people lost their jobs and an estimated 4 million fell into poverty
  • Tourism was affected, even in places that weren’t closed, due to psychological aversion
  • Damage to sewage caused the spread of liquid waste, industrial chemicals and polluted water, further damaging the environment
  • Sanitation and fresh water were provided to prevent the spread of disease
  • Over $10 billion pledged to help those affected
  • The World Food Programme provided food for over 1.3 million people
  • The Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning system was set up, and functioned successfully for the 2012 Indian Ocean earthquakes
  • The Australian government sent ecological experts to the Maldives to help restore the marine environment

Shaping Minds

Disaster Management Project for Class 9 – Complete Guide

tsunami case study class 9

Written By Avinash Sharan

Class 9 | projects 9, 13 comment(s), 10th may 2020, disaster management project.

It is mandatory to do a Disaster Management project for class 9 students every year.

According to CBSE, students studying in class IX have to submit a handwritten project on Disaster Management.

Topics will be provided by the school. The topic may be Natural Disasters or Man-Made disasters.

The purpose of giving this Disaster Management project to class 9 students is to make them prepared for any disaster.

Further, they can also spread awareness to the mass about the precautions to be taken at the time of National/Local Disasters.

Are you looking for a project on Tsunamis? Simply click the link https://shapingminds.in/project-on-tsunami/

To get the latest project on Sustainable Developmen t, click on the link.

“Project On Heat Stroke”- Understanding the Risks and Prevention

Things to be kept in mind while doing the project

Follow cbse guidelines strictly..

  • Firstly, USE A-4 size file paper (one side ruled)
  • Secondly, Use blue or black ink to write your project.
  • Thirdly, design the cover page in such a way that it reflects your topic.
  • Fourthly, write the Topic of the project, Name, Class, and Sec, and Roll no. on the cover page in bold letters.
  • Use the bottom space for your Name, Class, and sec, Roll no.
  • However, the project work should not be less than 15 pages (including the cover page)
  • Be ready for Viva or written assignments based on your project.
  • Utilize summer vacation / Lockdown time to complete your project.
  • Lastly, do not use plastic covers.

SEQUENCE OF PAGES: DISASTER MANAGEMENT PROJECT 

will be your cover page with topics like

TOPIC: COVID-19 PANDEMIC IN INDIA and then show your creativity in designing the page.

Page No. 2:

Acknowledgment: (what should be written) see an example below.

Acknowledgment

From the core of my heart, I am very thankful to everyone who all supported me, for I have completed my project effectively and moreover on time. I am overwhelmed in all humility and grateful to acknowledge my depth to all those who helped me to put these ideas well. equally grateful to my ( NAME OF SUBJECT TEACHER ) for giving me moral support and guidance in doing this project. It would be an injustice if I do not thank my parents who helped me a lot in collecting data, pictures, and continuous help and support. With their able guidance, encouragement, and support, I could complete my project on time.

Thanking you,

( Name of the student)

You may be interested in:

11 Points To Include In Your Industrial Disaster Management Project

11 Points You Must Include In Your Disaster Management Project On Climate Change

This page will be of Index as given in every textbook where the name of the chapters in the sequence is given along with page numbers. For example…….

                        INDEX

i) Introduction:   pg 4.

ii) How the disaster takes place…………pg 5

iii) Preparedness before disaster………….pg 6

iv) Preparedness during disaster………..pg 7 & 8

v) Preparedness after disaster…………….pg 9 & 10.

Page No.4 & 5:

a short description of COVID-19 and a brief history of how it spread. Take the help of Newspapers or the Internet. (minimum 2 pages i.e. pg 4 & 5):

Read about the seven most frequently asked questions on   International Date Line

Introduction – A brief History of COVID 19

Coronavirus actually belongs to the Coronaviridae family. It represents crown-like spikes on the outer surface of the virus, therefore, it was named as coronavirus. This virus is minute in size and causes the acute respiratory syndrome. These viruses were thought to infect only animals until the world witnessed a severe outbreak caused by SARS in Guangdong, China.

At the end of 2019, Wuhan- a fast-emerging business hub of China experienced an outbreak of coronavirus, killing more than 1800 and infected our 70 thousand individuals in just a span of 50 days. Health officials are still tracing the exact source of this new coronavirus, early findings (hypothesis) thought it may be linked to s seafood market in Wuhan. However, the first reported case came on 1st December, which had no link to the seafood market. Therefore, investigations are going on to find the exact reason for the originating and spread of COVID-19.

In 2003, an outbreak of SARS stands for the severe acute respiratory syndrome. An outbreak of SARS started in China and spread to other countries before ending in 2004. Coronavirus also known as COVID-19 seems to spread faster than the 2003 SARS and also may cause severe illness.

The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses named the virus as SARS- CoV 19 and the disease COVID-19.

IF YOU ARE IN CLASS IX, THE FOLLOWING LINKS MAY BE HELPFUL TO YOU

Clear And Unbiased Facts About Project On Global Warming  

Project On Tsunami: 13 Pages You Must Include In Your Disaster Management Project

Page No. 6 & 7

Mention the causes and symptoms:

Coronavirus typically affect the respiratory tracts of birds and mammals including humans. Doctors associate them with common cold, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome.

The main way the disease spreads is through respiratory droplets expelled by someone who is coughing. The risk of catching COVID-19 from someone with no symptoms at all is very low.

However, many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms. This is particularly true at the early stages of the disease. It is therefore possible to catch COVID-19 from someone who has, for example, just a mild cough and does not feel ill.

Common Symptoms

Researchers in China found that the most common symptoms among people who had COVID-19 include:

Loss of appetite

Shortness of breath and Mucus.

However, these symptoms usually begin 2 to 14 days after you come into contact with the virus.

There may be other symptoms as well such as sore throat, headache vomiting etc.

If you have any of these symptoms then

i) isolate yourself.

ii) stay away from others as much as possible.

iii) stay in a closed room and use a separate soap, towel, clothes, handkerchief and if possible toilet and bathroom.

If you are below 10 years of age or above 50 years of age with diabetes, blood pressure, weakness etc., then you are at a high risk of complications.

Therefore, immediately call your doctor and seek immediate medical help.

Page No. 8: 

Extent of damage : On this page you have to mention about the extent of damage done in different countries. Take the help of newspapers or internet for latest information. You can also show the spread of this virus in different countries on the world map with different colours.

Steps taken by the government to combat this disaster: You may explain:

i) Lock down

ii) Precautions to be taken during lock down period like social distancing, sanitizing hands etc.

Very Important for TERM II (Case study based questions)

TERM II CLASS IX – GEOGRAPHY WORKSHEET ON CLIMATE – SOLVED

Case Study Based Questions From Natural Vegetation And Wildlife – Term II (SOLVED)

Page No 10 & 11

Contribution of people who are involved in combating this disaster. In this page you can mention about the role of Doctors, Nurses, Police, people involved in maintaining cleanliness etc. in details along with images, drawings, pictures, newspaper cuttings etc on the left side of your page.

Page No. 12 

Lessons Learnt:

what lessons have you learnt from this disaster.

Page No 13 INCLUDE DO’S AND DONT’S IN YOUR DISASTER MANAGEMENT PROJECT

HEADING: Do’s and dont’s for next time to avoid such disasters.

Mention about a few things which can be done everyday to protect yourself from this disaster in points.

Similarly Mention about a few things which you should not do to protect yourself from this disaster in points.

Page No. 14:

Bibliography:  A bibliography usually contains about the websites you visited, the newspapers name from where you have collected the data or pictures, etc. Whichever book, magazine, shops or websites you have visited, you must mention about that.

Page No. 15:

Keep the last page of your project for teacher’s remarks and grade/marks.

6. Lastly, go for spiral bound cover and submit your project.

Just invest 1 day and 13 pages to complete your project on  Tsunami    as per CBSE norms.

THERE IS NO RULE FOR NUMBER OF PAGES BUT IT SHOULD NOT BE LESS THAN 15. YOU MAY ADD FEW MORE PAGES ALSO IF YOU WANT. 

Follow Guidelines of CBSE   strictly on Disaster Management Project.

Was this article helpful to you? Please like , share and subscribe .

Do You Want To Do A Project On Man Made Disaster, Then Click On The Given Link.

Get the latest project on Sustainable Developmen t, click on the link.

“Project On Heat Stroke”- Understanding the Risks and Prevention

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13 Comments

Divyanshu giri

Thank you ji

Ankush kaushik

Thanku it really helps me

Ajay shetty

Bro you helped me alot

Avinash Sharan

Thank you once again. Avinash Sharan.

Parth

I want disaster management on earthquake

nishchal gupta

very good this helped me in making my project

Name *purusotam Rai

Welcome Purushottam.

Bhoomi Sihag

It is very much helpful . Thank You so much Sir.

Thank you Bhoomi.

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Tsunami disasters: case studies and reports.

tsunami case study class 9

This Collection is part of the 'Tsunami Disaster Channel' containing a number of case studies and reports relevant to tsunami disasters, where we try to find out what we have learnt from the past and how we can best reduce risk in future natural disasters. Current guidance comes from leading global organizations: Foreign - Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) ,    Swiss Resource Centre and Consultancies for Development Foundation (SKAT) ,  Office of the UN Secretary General Special Envoy for Tsunami Recovery ,  United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) ,  United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) ,  United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) .   Please send suggestions for additional content for this Collection to  [email protected] . You might find other helpful collections on tsunami disasters below."

Resources on this Collection

tsunami case study class 9

10 Lessons Learned from the South Asia Tsunami of 26th December 2004

tsunami case study class 9

Approaches to Equity in Post-Tsunami Assistance - Sri Lanka: A Case Study

tsunami case study class 9

Environment and Reconstruction in Aceh: two years after the tsunami

tsunami case study class 9

Evolving Strategies For Long-term Rehabilitation On Shelter and Development in the Tsunami Affected Areas of Tamil Nadu

tsunami case study class 9

Impact of the tsunami response on local and national capacities: Maldives country report

tsunami case study class 9

Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami UNICEF response at six months update

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Coastal Processes, Hazards, and Society

Case Study: Sumatra and Thailand and the 2004 Tsunami

Print

The Importance of Tsunami Warning Systems and the challenges of warning communication.

Think back to the video you watched in Module 7 – which included scenes of the 2004 tsunami event in Indonesia. The beginning of the video focused on the Banda Aceh area of Sumatra, where fishing communities and small coastal cities were completely destroyed, and the end of the video featured the Phuket area, where more tourist beaches were affected.

Through your reading and watching the videos, you hopefully gained an idea of what it is like to be caught in a tsunami with no advanced warning, and how frantic the attempts to get out of the way must be. Imagine what it would be like to try to move small children, sick or elderly people out of the way of a tsunami with before the wave strikes and with no time to spare!

In Module 7, the events in Phuket, Thailand, are described, with tourists enjoying their vacation on the beach at Christmas 2004. Many are oblivious to the dangers of the approaching tsunami. What could have been done differently? If this were to happen again, would these communities be better informed and prepared?

In Module 7 we also mentioned that early warning systems are very tricky because of the challenges of getting the message out soon enough after the earthquake and before the tsunami waves arrive at a particular shoreline. For example, the towns on the west coast of Sumatra are so close to the Andaman fault that they had almost no time to react, so a warning may not have worked, regardless of how well it was transmitted. Banda Aceh, on the northern tip of Sumatra, was devastated in 2004 because people did not have time to react, while there is evidence that some small nearby island communities fared better where traditional knowledge of the natural warning signs such as the sudden receding of the tidal waters was employed, and residents were able to flee to higher ground. Meanwhile, the tourist destinations of Phuket and Phi Phi, and nearby locations in Thailand had 2 hours, but the warnings were lacking. Visitors lacked necessary knowledge of nature’s warning signs and how to react, and may not have felt the earthquake, so many lives were lost.

In response to the enormous loss of life in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the Global Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System was put in place. The Indian Ocean tsunami warning system now integrates the signals from seismographs and DART Buoys and transmits data to 26 national centers. Warnings at the local level are generated in the form of SMS messages, mosque loudspeakers, sirens, and other methods to warn citizens. How well the warnings translate into lives saved due to rapid response and appropriate behaviors by the citizens depends on each step working properly. The failure of one of the steps can lead to disaster. If the citizens do not have the knowledge needed to take effective action, then the process will not work, and lives will be lost.

In 2012 another earthquake occurred near Banda Aceh in the Indian Ocean, so the newly implemented warning systems were put to the test. In this case, no tsunami was generated by the earthquake, but unfortunately, the weaknesses in the system were revealed. Despite the efforts expended to increase levels of tsunami preparedness since 2004, including new tsunami evacuation shelters and education programs, chaos ensued. Hearing the tsunami warning, people panicked and tried to flee by car, resulting in gridlock on the roads. It was clear that better guidance from the local government was needed, including clear evacuation route signage and regular drills. For more detail on this topic, read the National Geographic article Will Indonesia Be Ready for the Next Tsunami? Clearly, more work is still needed and ongoing to address these weaknesses.

Rubble and debris amidst sand, mud, and standing water.

Learning Check Point

We will spend a few minutes also revisiting the accounts of historic tsunami events – in particular, the 1960 event and its effects in Chile and Hilo, Hawaii, and the important messages about how to survive a tsunami. Please re-read some of the accounts of survival during tsunami events in Heed Natural Warnings .

Disaster Management Project for Class 9 & 10 PDF Download_0.1

Disaster Management Project for Class 9 & 10, PDF Download

The Disaster Management Act was passed by the Lok Sabha on 28 Nov 2005 and by the Rajya Sabha on 12 Dec 2005. On 1 June 2016, Narendra Modi, the PM of India, launched the Disaster management plan

DISASTER MANAGEMENT

Table of Contents

Disaster management in India is one of the most crucial points of discussion because of India’s highly diversified Climate. Indian Subcontinent is frequently evident of natural catastrophes such as Cyclones, earthquakes, floods, and droughts. Disaster management is the process of planning for and responding to natural disasters. It entails carefully organising resources to mitigate the damage caused by calamities. It also entails a systematic strategy for handling catastrophe prevention, readiness, response, and recovery duties. n the article we will discuss Disaster Management Types, how to prepare Disaster Management Projects for Class 9 and 10 students along with Disaster Management Project ideas.

What is Disaster Management Class 9?

According to the United Nations, a disaster is a major disruption of a community or society’s ability to function that involves extensive affects on people, property, the economy, or the environment and beyond the capacity of the affected community or society to deal using its own resources.

Disaster management is the process by which we “prepare for, respond to and learn from the effects of big failures”. It is how we cope with the human, material, economic, or environmental impacts of a given disaster. Disasters can have human causes, despite the fact that nature frequently causes them. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies defines a disaster as when a risk affects individuals who are already weak.

Disaster Management Cycle

Organizations and people use the disaster management cycle, which consists of a sequence of processes, to plan for, contain, and mitigate unforeseen disasters. These could include unforeseen property damage, natural disasters, or other occurrences that put other people’s lives in peril. After the initial crisis has passed, the disaster management cycle assists everyone in minimising the effects of unforeseen events and recovering as much resources as possible. A disaster management cycle aids persons affected by disasters by assisting in their reconstruction, regrouping, and recovery.

Disaster Management Cycle

Disaster Management: Types of Disaster

Disasters can take many different forms. Disasters, in whatever shape they take, disturb communities and can have major consequences for people, property, businesses, and the environment. They frequently test a community’s ability to cope. Human-caused disasters, such as industrial explosions or structural breakdowns, are the result of human error. Natural catastrophes are caused by physical occurrences such as earthquakes and droughts. Complex disasters might include epidemics or armed conflicts. Disasters are categorised into the following types-

  • Floods, hail storms, cloudbursts, cyclones, heat waves, cold waves, droughts, and hurricanes are all examples of water-related disasters .
  • Landslides, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tornadoes are examples of geological disasters .
  • Man-made disasters include urban and forest fires, oil spills, and the collapse of massive constructions.
  • Biological disasters include viral outbreaks, pest invasions, livestock epidemics, and locust plagues.
  • Chemical and industrial mishaps, mining shaft fires, and oil spills are examples of industrial disasters.
  • Nuclear disasters include nuclear core meltdowns and radiation burn, sickness.

CUET

Disaster Management Act, 2005 for Class 9 & 10

The Lok Sabha enacted the Disaster Management Act on November 28, 2005, and the Rajya Sabha did it on December 12, 2005. On January 9, 2006, the Indian President gave his approval. The Act mandates the creation of the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), whose chairman shall be the Prime Minister of India. At any given moment, the NDMA can only have nine members total, including the vice-chairperson. The NDMA members are appointed for a five-year term. On 27 September 2005, the NDMA was formally established in accordance with Section 3(1) of the Disaster Management Act after being first established on 30 May 2005 by executive order. The NDMA is in charge of “setting down the rules, plans, and procedures for disaster management” as well as making sure that disaster responses are swift and efficient. It is tasked with establishing “guidelines to be followed by the State Authorities in drawing up the national Plans” in accordance with Section 6 of the Act. The Disaster Management Act of 2005 acknowledges Disaster Management as a crucial process of planning, organizing, coordinating, and implementing measures which are necessary for-

  • Prevention of the threat of any disaster
  • Reduction of risk of any disaster or its consequences
  • Readiness to deal with any disaster
  • Promptness in dealing with a disaster
  • Assessing the severity of the effects of any disaster
  • Rescue and relief
  • Rehabilitation and Reconstruction

Read more: Consumer Awareness in India Project for Class 10

Disaster Management Agencies in India

Some agencies are involved in disaster management that we study below in detail

  • National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA):-  The National Disaster Management Authority, or the NDMA, is an apex body for disaster management, governed by the Prime Minister of India. It is charge of the supervision, direction, and control of the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF).
  • National Executive Committee (NEC):- The NEC is composed of high-profile ministerial members from the government of India that consist of the Union Home Secretary as Chairperson, and the Secretaries to the Government of India (GoI)like Ministries/Departments of Agriculture, Atomic Energy, Defence, Drinking Water Supply, Environment and Forests, etc. The NEC covers the National Plan for Disaster Management as per the National Policy on Disaster Management.
  • State Disaster Management Authority (SDMA):-  The Chief Minister of the respective state is the head of the SDMA.The State Government has a State Executive Committee (SEC) which assists the State Disaster Management Authority (SDMA) on Disaster Management.
  • District Disaster Management Authority (DDMA):-  The DDMA is headed by the District Collector, Deputy Commissioner or District Magistrate depending on the situation, with the elected representatives of the local authority as the Co-Chairperson. The DDMA ensures that the guidelines framed by the NDMA and the SDMA are followed by all the departments of the State Government at the District level and the local authorities in the District.
  • Local Authorities:-  Local authorities would include Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRI), Municipalities, District and Cantonment 11 Institutional and Legal Arrangements Boards, and Town Planning Authorities which control and manage civic services.

Must read: Simple Electric Motor Project and Diagram for Class 10

Project on Disaster management

A disaster management project is a strategy created to aid a community or organisation in disaster prevention, response, and recovery. Natural or man-made, disasters can result in a variety of harm, including destruction of physical property, injuries, and fatalities.

A disaster management project’s objective is to lessen the effects of a disaster by: 

  • Identifying potential risks and hazards
  • Creating plans to reduce the risks and hazards
  • preparing people for disaster response
  • putting in place a structure to manage relief operations

CUET 2024 Samarth 2.0 Arts Complete Batch

Disaster Management Project pdf for Class 9 & 10 Download

The PDF of the Disaster Management project for class 10 is given below so that candidates can download it

Disaster Management

Disasters Management Project -Types

  • Hazard mitigation projects: These projects are designed to reduce the impact of a disaster by reducing the risk of a hazard occurring or by reducing the damage that a hazard can cause. For example, a hazard mitigation project might involve building a levee to protect a community from flooding or planting trees to help prevent erosion.
  • Emergency response plans: These plans outline how a community or organization will respond to a disaster. They typically include information on how to evacuate people, how to provide food and water, and how to provide medical care.
  • Recovery plans: These plans outline how a community or organization will recover from a disaster. They typically include information on how to rebuild infrastructure, how to provide financial assistance, and how to help people get back to their normal lives .
  • Natural disasters management projects
  • Man made disasters management projects

Natural Disasters Management Projects

The disasters which are caused by nature are termed natural disasters. For examples: earthquakes, floods, droughts, etc.

Man-made Disasters Management Projects

The disasters which are the results of human activities are known as man-made disasters. For examples: road accidents, and terrorist attacks.

Tips for developing a disaster management project

Here are some tips for developing a disaster management project.

1.The first stage in creating a disaster management project is identifying the potential risks and hazards that your community or organisation may encounter. You can achieve this by performing a hazard analysis. 2.Identify potential hazards and risks, then create plans to reduce them. This is necessary after you have determined what potential risks and hazards exist. This could entail creating evacuation preparations, planting trees, or establishing levees. 3.Teach people how to handle emergencies: It’s crucial to teach individuals how to handle emergencies. This can entail instructing individuals in evacuation procedures, first aid techniques, or how to assist the injured. 4.Create a system for coordinating relief efforts: It’s critical to have a system in place for coordinating relief efforts in the case of a disaster. This can entail creating a command centre or a communication strategy.

Disaster Management Project for Class 9 & 10 PDF Download_5.1

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Que. What are the 4 types of disaster management?

Emergency managers think of disasters as recurring events with four phases: Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery. 

When was Disaster Management in India?

On 23 December 2005, the Government of India enacted the Disaster Management Act.

What are the 2 main types of disasters?

Types of Disasters - Natural and Human-Caused Disasters.

What is the main aim of disaster management?

The ultimate goal of the disaster-management leader is to minimize the event's impact, something that involves preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation.

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  • This Day In History Dec - 26

Tsunami Struck the Indian Ocean - [December 26, 2004] This Day in History

On 26 December 2004, a megathrust earthquake with its epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia struck the Indian Ocean and triggered a series of devastating tsunamis that affected 14 countries including India, killing a total of about 2,80,000 people.

This is an important day in history. Aspirants can read about other important ‘ This Day in History ‘ topics from the linked article.

Aspirants would find this article very helpful while preparing for the IAS Exam .

Indian Ocean Tsunami

  • A tsunami or a seismic sea wave is a series of waves that are caused in a large water body like an ocean by the displacement of massive volumes of water. The displacement can occur due to earthquakes , volcanic eruptions, landslides, meteorite impacts, underwater explosions, etc.
  • Tsunamis are sometimes called tidal waves because they resemble rapidly rising tides, but scientists avoid this usage since tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the sun and the moon whereas tsunamis are caused by water displacement.
  • The 2004 tsunami was caused by a massive earthquake that was the third-largest earthquake ever recorded on a seismograph. It measured between 9.1 and 9.3-moment magnitude. The duration of faulting was between 8.3 and 10 minutes and this was the longest ever.
  • The epicentre was in the Indian Ocean between Simeulue and mainland Indonesia.
  • The scientific community named this earthquake the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake . It’s very high intensity makes it a megathrust earthquake.
  • About 1600 km of fault surface slipped 15 m along the zone where the Indian Plate slides under the Burma Plate.
  • It triggered several aftershocks for up to 3 to 4 months after the event. An enormous amount of energy was released as a result of the seismic activity and the earth is said to have wobbled minutely on its axis. The alteration in the mass and the energy released also caused a change in the earth’s rotation.
  • Due to the earthquake, the seabed rose vertically by many metres displacing a huge volume of water thus, causing the tsunami.
  • Indonesia was the first country to be hit by the tsunami because of its proximity. It also saw the maximum casualty, close to 1,70,000 being killed.
  • The eastern coast of India was hit about 2 hours later sometime after 9:00 AM local time. Kerala was hit after another 2 hours. It also hit countries far away like Somalia, Tanzania and even South Africa. Bangladesh was spared the horror despite its nearness to the epicentre because the tsunami waves were in the east-west direction.
  • The tsunami was also detected in Antarctica, Mexico and Vancouver in Canada.

While IAS Exam aspirants prepare geography-related topics, they come across various topics which need better understanding. Such topics are linked below:

Effects on India

  • In India, the states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Andhra Pradesh were badly affected. The Andaman and Nicobar Islands were also severely affected. Fortunately, many of the aboriginal tribal people were safe thanks to their oral traditions and wisdom which made them flee to safer higher grounds before the tsunami struck.
  • Before the tsunami struck taking people by surprise, they observed a “sea disappearing” effect, i.e, the sea retreated by as much as 2.5 km in some places. Many people who had come to witness this were submerged when the tsunami struck suddenly. The waves were as high as 100 feet in many places.
  • In Thailand, many European vacationers were also affected.
  • Countries that were affected by the disaster in approximate decreasing order of casualties: Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, Somalia, Myanmar, Maldives, Malaysia, Tanzania, Seychelles, Bangladesh, South Africa, Yemen, Kenya and Madagascar. Many European countries like Sweden and Germany also had a large number of victims.
  • This 2004 tsunami was the deadliest recorded tsunami in history.
  • The catastrophe triggered a massive wave of humanitarian aid from all over the world with governments, organisations and individuals contributing significantly.
  • The tsunami also destroyed the economies of many communities, especially that relied on the sea for a living.
  • In India, the coastal town of Nagapattinam in Tamil Nadu reported the most number of deaths with over 6000 people killed. Many villages were completely destroyed.
  • The total damage caused due to the tsunami in 2004 is about USD 19.6 billion.

Candidates may also learn about disaster management from the related links below:

Indian Ocean Tsunami:  Download PDF Here

For more information about the general pattern of the UPSC Exams, visit the UPSC Syllabus page. Candidates can also find additional UPSC preparation material and articles in the table below:

Related Links

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Case Study Questions for Class 9 Maths

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Are you preparing for your Class 9 Maths board exams and looking for an effective study resource? Well, you’re in luck! In this article, we will provide you with a collection of Case Study Questions for Class 9 Maths specifically designed to help you excel in your exams. These questions are carefully curated to cover various mathematical concepts and problem-solving techniques. So, let’s dive in and explore these valuable resources that will enhance your preparation and boost your confidence.

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CBSE Class 9 Maths Board Exam will have a set of questions based on case studies in the form of MCQs. The CBSE Class 9 Mathematics Question Bank on Case Studies, provided in this article, can be very helpful to understand the new format of questions. Share this link with your friends.

If you want to want to prepare all the tough, tricky & difficult questions for your upcoming exams, this is where you should hang out.  CBSE Case Study Questions for Class 9  will provide you with detailed, latest, comprehensive & confidence-inspiring solutions to the maximum number of Case Study Questions covering all the topics from your  NCERT Text Books !

Table of Contents

CBSE Class 9th – MATHS: Chapterwise Case Study Question & Solution

Case study questions are a form of examination where students are presented with real-life scenarios that require the application of mathematical concepts to arrive at a solution. These questions are designed to assess students’ problem-solving abilities, critical thinking skills, and understanding of mathematical concepts in practical contexts.

Chapterwise Case Study Questions for Class 9 Maths

Case study questions play a crucial role in the field of mathematics education. They provide students with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world situations, thereby enhancing their comprehension of mathematical concepts. By engaging with case study questions, students develop the ability to analyze complex problems, make connections between different mathematical concepts, and formulate effective problem-solving strategies.

  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 1 Number System
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 2 Polynomials
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 3 Coordinate Geometry
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 4 Linear Equations in Two Variables
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 5 Introduction to Euclid’s Geometry
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 6 Lines and Angles
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 7 Triangles
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 8 Quadilaterals
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 9 Areas of Parallelograms and Triangles
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 10 Circles
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 11 Constructions
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 12 Heron’s Formula
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 13 Surface Area and Volumes
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 14 Statistics
  • Case Study Questions for Chapter 15 Probability

The above  Case studies for Class 9 Mathematics will help you to boost your scores as Case Study questions have been coming in your examinations. These CBSE Class 9 Maths Case Studies have been developed by experienced teachers of schools.studyrate.in for benefit of Class 10 students.

  • Class 9 Science Case Study Questions
  • Class 9 Social Science Case Study Questions

How to Approach Case Study Questions

When tackling case study questions, it is essential to adopt a systematic approach. Here are some steps to help you approach and solve these types of questions effectively:

  • Read the case study carefully: Understand the given scenario and identify the key information.
  • Identify the mathematical concepts involved: Determine the relevant mathematical concepts and formulas applicable to the problem.
  • Formulate a plan: Devise a plan or strategy to solve the problem based on the given information and mathematical concepts.
  • Solve the problem step by step: Apply the chosen approach and perform calculations or manipulations to arrive at the solution.
  • Verify and interpret the results: Ensure the solution aligns with the initial problem and interpret the findings in the context of the case study.

Tips for Solving Case Study Questions

Here are some valuable tips to help you effectively solve case study questions:

  • Read the question thoroughly and underline or highlight important information.
  • Break down the problem into smaller, manageable parts.
  • Visualize the problem using diagrams or charts if applicable.
  • Use appropriate mathematical formulas and concepts to solve the problem.
  • Show all the steps of your calculations to ensure clarity.
  • Check your final answer and review the solution for accuracy and relevance to the case study.

Benefits of Practicing Case Study Questions

Practicing case study questions offers several benefits that can significantly contribute to your mathematical proficiency:

  • Enhances critical thinking skills
  • Improves problem-solving abilities
  • Deepens understanding of mathematical concepts
  • Develops analytical reasoning
  • Prepares you for real-life applications of mathematics
  • Boosts confidence in approaching complex mathematical problems

Case study questions offer a unique opportunity to apply mathematical knowledge in practical scenarios. By practicing these questions, you can enhance your problem-solving abilities, develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts, and boost your confidence for the Class 9 Maths board exams. Remember to approach each question systematically, apply the relevant concepts, and review your solutions for accuracy. Access the PDF resource provided to access a wealth of case study questions and further elevate your preparation.

Q1: Can case study questions help me score better in my Class 9 Maths exams?

Yes, practicing case study questions can significantly improve your problem-solving skills and boost your performance in exams. These questions offer a practical approach to understanding mathematical concepts and their real-life applications.

Q2: Are the case study questions in the PDF resource relevant to the Class 9 Maths syllabus?

Absolutely! The PDF resource contains case study questions that align with the Class 9 Maths syllabus. They cover various topics and concepts included in the curriculum, ensuring comprehensive preparation.

Q3: Are the solutions provided for the case study questions in the PDF resource?

Yes, the PDF resource includes solutions for each case study question. You can refer to these solutions to validate your answers and gain a better understanding of the problem-solving process.

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  23. Case Study Questions for Class 9 Maths

    CBSE Class 9 Maths Board Exam will have a set of questions based on case studies in the form of MCQs.The CBSE Class 9 Mathematics Question Bank on Case Studies, provided in this article, can be very helpful to understand the new format of questions. Share this link with your friends. If you want to want to prepare all the tough, tricky & difficult questions for your upcoming exams, this is ...

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