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Did an Unorthodox Therapist Drive a Woman to Suicide?

“Case Study,” by Graeme Macrae Burnet, is a novel of found documents detailing troubled lives and shifting identities.

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By Christian Lorentzen

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CASE STUDY, by Graeme Macrae Burnet

To get to Primrose Hill from central London, you take the Tube to Chalk Farm Station, exit to your right toward a cafe and an off-license, and climb a path to an overpass above train tracks. The path is called, rather unassumingly, Bridge Approach, and a five-minute walk leads to Primrose Hill. I happened to live in these parts for three years, and I crossed the overpass twice a day most days. Just to the south is the Pembroke Castle pub, where Liam Gallagher of Oasis was once arrested, in 1998. Another neighborhood tippler, Kingsley Amis, favored the Queen’s at the corner of St. George’s Terrace, according to his biographer Zachary Leader, who printed his monthly tab. From my balcony I could see the phone box where Sylvia Plath would desperately call Ted Hughes at his lover’s flat in her last days. It is a quiet neighborhood, but one dense with intrigue and peopled by famous, messy and tortured artistic personages.

The events of Graeme Macrae Burnet’s fourth novel, “Case Study,” are set off by a suicide in the 1960s by a young woman named Veronica, who jumps from the Bridge Approach overpass and is struck by the 4:45 train to High Barnet. (I am not sure that High Barnet trains, rather than Edgware-bound ones, run on this track, nor that the overpass itself, rather than just the path that approaches it, is called Bridge Approach, but these are the sorts of possible slight inaccuracies that Burnet and his not entirely reliable narrators relish.) An investigation into Veronica’s death and the man who might have been responsible for it — her therapist, Arthur Collins Braithwaite, whose office is on Primrose Hill — forms the substance of the narrative. Like Burnet’s previous novel, “ His Bloody Project ” (2016), “Case Study” was nominated for the Booker Prize and consists largely of purportedly found documents.

The would-be Miss Marple of Burnet’s loopy detective story is Veronica’s unnamed younger sister, who, under the alias Rebecca Smyth, becomes Braithwaite’s patient to find out if he drove Veronica to take her own life. Rebecca details her five sessions in notebooks that decades later end up in the hands of a writer named GMB, our frame narrator, who is researching Braithwaite for a potential biography. Now cast into obscurity, the (fictional) therapist was once a figure of note, appearing on BBC chat shows and publishing the books “Untherapy,” a best seller, and “Kill Your Self,” which Rebecca calls “a jumble of incomprehensible sentences, each having no discernible relationship to its neighbors.” Still, we are told by GMB, “Kill Your Self” “captured the zeitgeist,” acquired for its author a cult following from which he drew a lucrative pool of patients, and “if anything, the impenetrability of certain passages only served to confirm the author’s genius.”

“Case Study” consists of a preface, in which GMB explains how he received the notebooks (from Rebecca’s cousin, who noticed a blog post by GMB on Braithwaite); the five notebooks themselves, one of which includes a chapter clipped from “Untherapy” about a patient who is clearly Veronica; five biographical chapters about Braithwaite by GMB, inserted between the notebooks; and a postscript, in which GMB ventures south to pay a visit to the Pembroke Castle. The elegant nested structure is one of the novel’s chief appeals. So is the contrast between Rebecca’s narrative voice, characterized by what GMB calls “a certain kooky élan,” and the cool tone of GMB’s Life of Braithwaite. What emerges is a comedy of identities tried on and discarded. Given the number of suicides that mark the story, it’s a comedy with dark underpinnings.

Rebecca lives with her father, a retired engineer, and their housekeeper, and works as a receptionist for a talent agent. Her mother died when she was 15, falling off a cliff before her eyes, during a family holiday in Devon. Given that Rebecca is the only witness to the fall, and that she admits to fantasizing about pushing someone off the cliff the sentence before recounting her mother’s death, we can’t help suspecting that she might have done it herself. But we have no more reason to doubt it than the rest of her story, and that’s part of the fun: The whole tale might be a hoax.

Unlike Veronica, who was a doctoral student in mathematics at Cambridge, Rebecca is not very ambitious. She’s an erstwhile fiction writer, having given up on writing after the one story she published in Women’s Journal didn’t have editors banging down the door for more. She is a homebody, happy to tend to her father and not be a “Modern Independent Woman.” She attests to being a virgin, and so becoming Rebecca Smyth means becoming someone else: the sort of woman who puts on lipstick, attends glamorous parties and drinks gin with gentlemen at the Pembridge Castle (as she calls the Pembroke Castle). Since she is not really that sort of woman, drinking even a little gin causes her to vomit in the bathroom the first time she tries it.

Braithwaite is also someone who puts on new identities, but at the same time he’s a recognizable English type: the humble boy from northern England who goes down to Oxford after the war and reinvents himself as a kind of romantic rogue. “Case Study” has a lot in common with the novels of Vladimir Nabokov and Roberto Bolaño, in which invented characters pass through tumultuous episodes of literary history that never quite happened, though it seems as if they should have. Braithwaite brushes against real-life figures, engaging in hostile correspondence with the psychiatrist R.D. Laing and becoming a confidant of the actor Dirk Bogarde. After an overblown scandal consumes his therapeutic practice and sets him off on a bender, he winds up back at the home of his father (another suicide) in the North, where he writes his unpublished memoir, “My Self and Other Strangers.” It is the source, we are told, of GMB’s biographical reconstructions.

“Case Study” is a diverting novel, overflowing with clever plays on and inversions of tropes of English intellectual and social life during the postwar decades. As such, it is not exactly an excursion into undiscovered literary terrain. Reading Burnet’s doubly mediated metafiction of North London neurotics and decadents, I often longed to turn back to the shelf for the real thing: fictions by Doris Lessing, Kingsley and Martin Amis, Muriel Spark, Jenny Diski, Julian Barnes, Alan Hollinghurst, Zadie Smith or Rachel Cusk; biographies of Plath and Hughes; films of kitchen-sink realism starring Bogarde and Laurence Harvey, with scripts by Harold Pinter; or even the documentaries of Adam Curtis, in which Laing often makes a cameo. It’s a compliment to put “Case Study” in that company and no insult to say that Burnet must have done his homework to get there. I imagine he lives in a flat full of piles of yellowing copies of The Times Literary Supplement, every issue a catalog of obscurities from across time. Humble children from the provinces who want to reinvent themselves have to get the stuff of their daydreams from somewhere.

Christian Lorentzen’s work has appeared in The London Review of Books, Bookforum and Harper’s Magazine.

CASE STUDY | By Graeme Macrae Burnet | 278 pp. | Biblioasis | Paperback, $17.95

An earlier version of this review misstated R.D. Laing’s profession. He was a psychiatrist, not a psychologist.

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Graeme Macrae Burnet: ‘enormous fun to read’

Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review – mind games as an artform

The fictional biography of a radical 60s psychoanalyst is expertly intercut with his pseudo-patient’s notebooks in this tightly constructed, hugely enjoyable mystery

L ike the star footballer who continues to play for his home town when bigger names come calling, there’s something pleasing about the author who, despite great success, sticks with their original publisher. Graeme Macrae Burnet’s second novel, His Bloody Project , was a runaway hit, shortlisted for the Booker prize and translated into 20 languages. His publisher, Saraband, is a small but brilliant independent press and has done a fine job with the elegant hardback of his fourth novel, Case Study .

It is ostensibly the biography – written by Macrae Burnet – of a (fictional) radical psychoanalyst in the mould of RD Laing, Collins Braithwaite. Braithwaite, who called himself an “untherapist”, was known as “Britain’s most dangerous man” in the 1960s, but his ideas faded until he was “barely a footnote in psychiatric history”. At the beginning of Case Study , Macrae Burnet tells us that he has come into possession of a series of notebooks written in the 60s by a patient of Braithwaite – a young woman, Veronica – who believes that the psychoanalyst has driven her sister to suicide.

Roberto Bolaño said that all novels are at their core detective novels. Macrae Burnet expands upon this, suggesting that the reader and the psychoanalyst – such intimate bedfellows – are both detectives gathering clues in pursuit of a final judgment that lies always just out of sight.

In her journal, Veronica tells us that she has gone to Braithwaite under a pseudonym, Rebecca Smyth, in the hope of understanding what happened to her sister, who threw herself from an overpass. “Suicide makes Miss Marples of us all,” she says. She endows Smyth with a character that is rakish, confident, provocative – quite the opposite to her own mousily downtrodden nature. Braithwaite analyses her – this fictitious self – as she attempts to winkle out revelations from him. These texts are intercut with selections from Braithwaite’s notebooks, from Macrae Burnet’s convincingly earnest biographical study of Braithwaite.

It’s a book that is enormous fun to read, a mystery and a psychological drama wrapped up in one. Buoyed by the evident pleasure Macrae Burnet takes in spinning such a tightly knit tale – the author’s note at the end is magnificent – Case Study is a triumph, and ought to give Saraband another success story.

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Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review — sexual repression, suicide and a Sixties psychologist

Graeme Macrae Burnet

Graeme Macrae Burnet earned a deserved place on the 2016 Booker shortlist with His Bloody Project , a novel about a triple murder in the Scottish Highlands of the 1860s. Not that everyone realised it was a novel. The premise was that Burnet had come across the case while researching his family history. He then presented the documents he’d supposedly discovered (witness statements, court reports, the killer’s memoir) so convincingly that some bookshops filed it under true crime. If a similar thing happens with the equally artful Case Study , you might want to check in the psychology section because it’s certainly worth finding.

In the preface Burnet “explains” that two years ago, in response to a blogpost he had written on the once controversial,

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by Graeme Macrae Burnet ‧ RELEASE DATE: Nov. 1, 2022

A brisk and engaging novel that wears itself thin on the grindstone of its own conceit.

A provocative send-up of midcentury British mores and the roots of modern psychotherapy.

Toward the end of 2019, GMB, a character with the author's initials, receives an email from one Martin Grey, who has in his possession several notebooks he believes GMB might find of interest. Mr. Grey asserts that the notebooks were written by his cousin about Collins Braithwaite, the notorious and now largely forgotten “ enfant terrible of the so-called anti-psychiatry movement of the 1960s,” on whom GMB has recently published a blog post. According to Grey, the notebooks contain evidence of near-criminal misconduct concerning Braithwaite’s involvement in the suicide of the diarist’s older sister, Veronica. GMB’s research assures him of the notebooks’ authenticity, if not their veracity, and he presents their contents verbatim, interspersed with sections of his own outline of Braithwaite’s salacious life and ignoble death. From the plinth of this metatextual introduction, the book dives into the “kooky élan” of a thoroughly middle-class young woman—the diarist—as she infiltrates Braithwaite’s office under the nom de guerre Rebecca Smyth. Rebecca is bent on uncovering the truth about Braithwaite’s therapeutic practice though she’s unsure what purpose this truth would serve. However, over the course of the five notebooks, Rebecca’s rapid descent into true depression coupled with her increasing difficulty in keeping her original identity separate from her assumed self become the driving narrative. As the novel progresses, the author’s layering of his fictional characters’ unverifiable testimony, frank deception, and self-aggrandizing half-truths with significant historical figures of the time—like R.D. Laing and Dirk Bogarde—and GMB's omnipresent frame narrative overlap to the extent that it's hard to tell not just whose perception to trust, but which among all these counterfeit identities is real. As beguiling as Rebecca’s wry domestic critique can be, the book’s star is clearly the carefully constructed unreliability Burnet imbues at every level of his writing. This results in a novel that strives toward the biggest of questions—in the absence of the Cartesian ego Braithwaite seeks to slay, is there anything at all underneath our masks?—but lacks the character-driven empathy that would encourage us to care about the answer.

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2022

ISBN: 978-1-77196-520-0

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Biblioasis

Review Posted Online: July 25, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2022

LITERARY FICTION | GENERAL FICTION

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Page Count: 480

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One of the noblest characters in American literature gets a novel worthy of him.

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case study graeme macrae burnet

StarTribune

Review: 'case study,' by graeme macrae burnet.

The underdog on the 2016 Man Booker Prize shortlist was the then relatively unknown Scottish author Graeme Macrae Burnet. Although it lost out to Paul Beatty in the end, Burnet's historical crime novel about one man's "most sanguinary deeds" made him a writer to watch. For "His Bloody Project" was more than a stirring tale of murder and madness in the Scottish Highlands in the 19th century. Composed of memoir excerpts, police statements and medical reports, it was also a cleverly crafted work, one that invited the reader to sift the collated evidence and determine the reliability of the narrators.

Burnet's new novel is another formally inventive offering made up of various documents, all of which act as interwoven narrative threads. "Case Study" sees Burnet re-examining themes of reality and identity through characters and sources that may or may not tell the whole story. Once again, he opens with a preface by a writer called "GMB," who attempts to pass off the startling fiction that follows as fact.

GMB explains how he came to possess six notebooks written by a former patient of Collins Braithwaite, a radical psychotherapist from the 1960s. Braithwaite is now forgotten, discredited and disgraced and his work is out of print. GMB is fascinated by this fallen figure but also wary, in case the notebooks, which supposedly contain allegations about Braithwaite, are forgeries. Despite his reservations, GMB reads the notebooks and presents them interspersed with his own biographical research into Braithwaite.

The notebooks give an account of events from 1965 by an unnamed woman. She is convinced that Braithwaite, "Britain's most dangerous man," should bear the blame for her sister's recent suicide. In a bid to find out who he is and how he drove her sister over the edge, the woman assumes the name of Rebecca Smyth and arranges a consultation with Braithwaite at his London practice. "Suicide," she writes, "makes Miss Marples of us all. One cannot help but look for clues."

Macrae's novel works on various levels. It is an elaborate, mind-bending guessing game; it is a blackly comic and quietly moving study of a nervous breakdown; and it is a captivating portrait of an egomaniac. If the notebooks depict a gripping chain of events, then the biographical sections expertly flesh out the grotesque, manipulative yet charismatic Braithwaite. Macrae has reliably delivered another work of fiendish fun.

Malcolm Forbes has written for the Times Literary Supplement, the Economist and the Wall Street Journal. He lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.

By: Graeme Macrae Burnet.

Publisher: Biblioasis, 288 pages, $16.95.

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case study graeme macrae burnet

© 2024 StarTribune. All rights reserved.

Graeme Macrae Burnet

case study graeme macrae burnet

***BREAKING NEWS***

I’m delighted to announce that the concluding part of the Georges Gorski trilogy A CASE OF MATRICIDE will published by Saraband Books in October. More here soon.

I am the author of four novels, the Booker  shortlisted His Bloody Project , Booker longlisted Case Study , The Disappearance of Adèle Bedeau and The Accident on the A35 .

I was named Author of the Year in the Sunday Herald Culture Awards 2017 and have appeared at festivals and events in the UK, Korea, Canada, the US, Russia, Estonia, Spain, France, Germany, China and quite a few other places. I’ve also written the occasional piece for The Guardian, The Observer and Le Monde.

I was born in Kilmarnock in Scotland and now live in Glasgow. I’ve previously lived and worked in Prague, Porto, Bordeaux and London.

Case Study has been named as one of the New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2022. It was also shortlisted for the Gordon Burn Prize , Ned Kelly International Crime Prize and longlisted for the Booker Prize , Dublin Literary Award and the Historical Writers’ Association Gold Crown award.

It’s published in the UK by Saraband, in North America by the good people of Biblioasis and is due for publication in 15 languages.

His Bloody Project has been published in over 20 languages including German, Russian, Chinese, French, Spanish, Farsi and Estonian.

My story Wolverine Blues, or a Case of Defiance Neurosis , based on a case history by Alphonse Maeder , is currently on BBC Sounds. You can listen to the first episode here . 

My agent is Isobel Dixon at Blake Friedmann. Her assistant is Roya Sarrafi-Gohar . For screen and theatrical rights, Conrad Williams is your man.

My email address is grabgraeme at hotmail dot com

For event organisers please note: I’m part of the  Scottish Book Trust’s Live Literature Database  which can help with funding for events in Scotland.

I’m on twitter here .

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Graeme Macrae Burnet

Case Study Paperback – October 19, 2021

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  • Print length 288 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Text Publishing
  • Publication date October 19, 2021
  • Dimensions 6.1 x 0.87 x 9.13 inches
  • ISBN-10 1922458155
  • ISBN-13 978-1922458155
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  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Text Publishing (October 19, 2021)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 288 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1922458155
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1922458155
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 13.4 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6.1 x 0.87 x 9.13 inches

About the author

Graeme macrae burnet.

Graeme Macrae Burnet is the author of the 'fiendishly readable' His Bloody Project, which was shortlisted for the 2016 Booker Prize and the LA Times Book Awards. It won the Saltire Prize for Fiction and has been published to great acclaim in twenty languages around the world.

His 2021 novel Case Study was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Ned Kelly International Crime Prize and Gordon Burn Prize. Hannah Kent (Burial Rites) called it 'a novel of mind-bending brilliance.'

He is also the author of a trilogy of novels set in the small French town of Saint-Louis and featuring detective Georges Gorski: The Disappearance of Adèle Bedeau (2014) and The Accident on the A35 (2017) and A Case of Matricide (October 2024).

"If Roland Barthes had written a detective novel, this would be it," was the Literary Review's verdict on The Accident on the A35

Born and brought up in Kilmarnock in the west of Scotland, Graeme now lives in Glasgow.

You can find him on twitter at @GMacraeBurnet.

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  1. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet, Paperback

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  2. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet

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  3. Case Study

    case study graeme macrae burnet

  4. Case Study (First Edition) by Graeme Macrae Burnet: New Hardcover (2021

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  5. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet

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  6. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet || Booker Prize Longlist 2022 Review

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VIDEO

  1. 1:1 tutoring: A case of the blind leading the blind? There's a better path! #EmPoweredSTEM

  2. Victoria's Book Review: His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet

  3. 2022 Booker Longlist Reaction

  4. Booker 2022 Shortlist prediction

  5. Segment 5: On Dr. Brené Brown and Dr. Gabor Maté

COMMENTS

  1. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    With Case Study, Graeme Macrae Burnet proves himself to be a master of the faux-factual narrative, sufficiently convincing that I've seen Case Study mentioned as non-fiction. Case Study is a pitch perfect retrospective look at one small corner of the 1960s and early 1970s, although Burnet's age precluded him from witnessing firsthand the ...

  2. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review

    Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review - unstable identities. This wry look at 1960s counterculture focuses on an enfant terrible of the anti-psychiatry movement to explore the gaps between ...

  3. Book Review: 'Case Study,' by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    The events of Graeme Macrae Burnet's fourth novel, "Case Study," are set off by a suicide in the 1960s by a young woman named Veronica, who jumps from the Bridge Approach overpass and is ...

  4. Case Study

    Case Study - Kindle edition by Burnet, Graeme Macrae. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Case Study. ... Graeme Macrae Burnet is the author of the 'fiendishly readable' His Bloody Project, which was shortlisted for the 2016 Booker ...

  5. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review

    Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review - mind games as an artform. The fictional biography of a radical 60s psychoanalyst is expertly intercut with his pseudo-patient's notebooks in this ...

  6. Case Study: Burnet, Graeme Macrae: 9781771965200: Amazon.com: Books

    Case Study is well-deserving of its praise." —Spectrum Culture "Ironical, intelligent and intriguing from first page to last, the fourth novel from Glasgow-based Graeme Macrae Burnet ... questions the tricky nature of identity." —Winnipeg Free Press "Burnet evokes a place and an era very nicely, in pitch-perfect prose ...

  7. Graeme Macrae Burnet interview: 'I like to surround my characters with

    With Case Study longlisted for the Booker Prize 2022, we spoke to Graeme Macrae Burnet about surrounding his characters with real people, resisting classification and his favourite Booker books Read an extract from Case Study here .

  8. Case Study

    Written by Graeme Macrae Burnet. Case Study was longlisted for the Booker Prize in 2022. Graeme Macrae Burnet offers a dazzlingly inventive - and often wickedly humorous - meditation on the nature of sanity, identity and truth itself. 'I have decided to write down everything that happens, because I feel, I suppose, I may be putting myself in ...

  9. CASE STUDY

    London, 1965. An unworldly young woman believes that a charismatic psychotherapist, Collins Braithwaite, has driven her sister to suicide. Intent on confirming her suspicions, she assumes a false identity and presents herself to him as a client, recording her experiences in a series of notebooks. But she soon finds herself drawn into a world in ...

  10. Case Study

    Case Study. Graeme Macrae Burnet. Biblioasis, Nov 1, 2022 - Fiction - 194 pages. Shortlisted for the 2022 Gordon Burn Prize • Shortlisted for the 2022 Ned Kelly Awards • Longlisted for the 2022 Booker Prize • Longlisted for the 2022 HWA Gold Crown Award • Longlisted for the 2023 Dublin Literary Award. SELECTED BY NEW YORK TIMES AS ONE ...

  11. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet review

    Tuesday September 28 2021, 12.01am, The Times. Graeme Macrae Burnet earned a deserved place on the 2016 Booker shortlist with His Bloody Project, a novel about a triple murder in the Scottish ...

  12. CASE STUDY

    A brisk and engaging novel that wears itself thin on the grindstone of its own conceit. A provocative send-up of midcentury British mores and the roots of modern psychotherapy. Toward the end of 2019, GMB, a character with the author's initials, receives an email from one Martin Grey, who has in his possession several notebooks he believes GMB ...

  13. Case Study: Burnet, Graeme Macrae, Manteghi, Serena, Rooney, Graeme

    Graeme Macrae Burnet has established a reputation for smart and literary mystery writing with his highly praised novel, His Bloody Project, which was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. He was born and brought up in Kilmarnock and has lived in Prague, Bordeaux, Porto, and London. He now lives in Glasgow ...

  14. Book review: Case Study, by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    Graeme Macrae Burnet is a master of the false but apparently authentic document. There are five lengthy ones in this, his fourth novel, intercut by a likewise credibly invented biographical sketch ...

  15. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    In Case Study, Graeme Macrae Burnet presents these notebooks interspersed with his own biographical research into Collins Braithwaite. The result is a dazzling - and often wickedly humorous - meditation on the nature of sanity, identity and truth itself, by one of the most inventive novelists writing today.

  16. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    CASE STUDY. 320pp. Saraband. £14.99. Graeme Macrae Burnet. "The tarmac of the path glistened like ink. I imagined stepping into it and slowly sinking up to my waist.". If you need any reminder that Graeme Macrae Burnet revels in metafiction then look no further than Case Study, his tortuous, cunning and highly self-conscious new novel ...

  17. Read the 2022 longlist: an extract from Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet is published by Saraband, £9.99. The Booker Prize Bookshop: Supporting Independent Booksellers. Features. Podcast. The Booker Prize Podcast, Episode 12: His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet. Reading guides.

  18. Case Study by Graeme Macrae Burnet, Paperback

    Case Study is an artfully twisted and presented fiction about identity and the stories we tell, and a wonderful evocation of 1960s London." "Burnet weaves together 'found' documents and the biography of a controversial psychologist to create an indelible portrait of a power struggle in 1960s London." —Vol 1.

  19. Case Study: Graeme Macrae Burnet: 9781913393441: Amazon.com: Books

    In Case Study, Graeme Macrae Burnet presents these notebooks interspersed with his own biographical research into Collins Braithwaite. The result is a dazzling - and often wickedly humorous - meditation on the nature of sanity, identity and truth itself, by one of the most inventive novelists writing today.

  20. Review: 'Case Study,' by Graeme Macrae Burnet

    Malcolm Forbes has written for the Times Literary Supplement, the Economist and the Wall Street Journal. He lives in Edinburgh, Scotland. Case Study. By: Graeme Macrae Burnet. Publisher ...

  21. Graeme Macrae Burnet

    I've also written the occasional piece for The Guardian, The Observer and Le Monde. I was born in Kilmarnock in Scotland and now live in Glasgow. I've previously lived and worked in Prague, Porto, Bordeaux and London. Case Study has been named as one of the New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2022. It was also shortlisted for the Gordon ...

  22. Case Study: Burnet, Graeme Macrae: 9781913393304: Amazon.com: Books

    Case Study is set in London, 1965 and tells the story, through a series of notebooks, of a young woman who believes that a radical psychotherapist called Collins Braithwaite has driven her sister to suicide. "A page-turning blast, funny, sinister and perfectly plotted," said The Times. Born and brought up in Kilmarnock, Graeme now lives in ...

  23. Case Study: Graeme Macrae Burnet: 9781922458155: Amazon.com: Books

    Graeme Macrae Burnet is the author of the 'fiendishly readable' His Bloody Project, which was shortlisted for the 2016 Booker Prize and the LA Times Book Awards. It won the Saltire Prize for Fiction and has been published to great acclaim in twenty languages around the world. His latest novel, Case Study has been longlisted for the 2022 Booker ...