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research project ideas year 12

100 Interesting Research Paper Topics for High Schoolers

What’s covered:, how to pick the right research topic, elements of a strong research paper.

  • Interesting Research Paper Topics

Composing a research paper can be a daunting task for first-time writers. In addition to making sure you’re using concise language and your thoughts are organized clearly, you need to find a topic that draws the reader in.

CollegeVine is here to help you brainstorm creative topics! Below are 100 interesting research paper topics that will help you engage with your project and keep you motivated until you’ve typed the final period. 

A research paper is similar to an academic essay but more lengthy and requires more research. This added length and depth is bittersweet: although a research paper is more work, you can create a more nuanced argument, and learn more about your topic. Research papers are a demonstration of your research ability and your ability to formulate a convincing argument. How well you’re able to engage with the sources and make original contributions will determine the strength of your paper. 

You can’t have a good research paper without a good research paper topic. “Good” is subjective, and different students will find different topics interesting. What’s important is that you find a topic that makes you want to find out more and make a convincing argument. Maybe you’ll be so interested that you’ll want to take it further and investigate some detail in even greater depth!

For example, last year over 4000 students applied for 500 spots in the Lumiere Research Scholar Program , a rigorous research program founded by Harvard researchers. The program pairs high-school students with Ph.D. mentors to work 1-on-1 on an independent research project . The program actually does not require you to have a research topic in mind when you apply, but pro tip: the more specific you can be the more likely you are to get in!

Introduction

The introduction to a research paper serves two critical functions: it conveys the topic of the paper and illustrates how you will address it. A strong introduction will also pique the interest of the reader and make them excited to read more. Selecting a research paper topic that is meaningful, interesting, and fascinates you is an excellent first step toward creating an engaging paper that people will want to read.

Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is technically part of the introduction—generally the last sentence of it—but is so important that it merits a section of its own. The thesis statement is a declarative sentence that tells the reader what the paper is about. A strong thesis statement serves three purposes: present the topic of the paper, deliver a clear opinion on the topic, and summarize the points the paper will cover.

An example of a good thesis statement of diversity in the workforce is:

Diversity in the workplace is not just a moral imperative but also a strategic advantage for businesses, as it fosters innovation, enhances creativity, improves decision-making, and enables companies to better understand and connect with a diverse customer base.

The body is the largest section of a research paper. It’s here where you support your thesis, present your facts and research, and persuade the reader.

Each paragraph in the body of a research paper should have its own idea. The idea is presented, generally in the first sentence of the paragraph, by a topic sentence. The topic sentence acts similarly to the thesis statement, only on a smaller scale, and every sentence in the paragraph with it supports the idea it conveys.

An example of a topic sentence on how diversity in the workplace fosters innovation is:

Diversity in the workplace fosters innovation by bringing together individuals with different backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences, which stimulates creativity, encourages new ideas, and leads to the development of innovative solutions to complex problems.

The body of an engaging research paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next. Create an outline before writing and order your ideas so that each idea logically leads to another.

The conclusion of a research paper should summarize your thesis and reinforce your argument. It’s common to restate the thesis in the conclusion of a research paper.

For example, a conclusion for a paper about diversity in the workforce is:

In conclusion, diversity in the workplace is vital to success in the modern business world. By embracing diversity, companies can tap into the full potential of their workforce, promote creativity and innovation, and better connect with a diverse customer base, ultimately leading to greater success and a more prosperous future for all.

Reference Page

The reference page is normally found at the end of a research paper. It provides proof that you did research using credible sources, properly credits the originators of information, and prevents plagiarism.

There are a number of different formats of reference pages, including APA, MLA, and Chicago. Make sure to format your reference page in your teacher’s preferred style.

  • Analyze the benefits of diversity in education.
  • Are charter schools useful for the national education system?
  • How has modern technology changed teaching?
  • Discuss the pros and cons of standardized testing.
  • What are the benefits of a gap year between high school and college?
  • What funding allocations give the most benefit to students?
  • Does homeschooling set students up for success?
  • Should universities/high schools require students to be vaccinated?
  • What effect does rising college tuition have on high schoolers?
  • Do students perform better in same-sex schools?
  • Discuss and analyze the impacts of a famous musician on pop music.
  • How has pop music evolved over the past decade?
  • How has the portrayal of women in music changed in the media over the past decade?
  • How does a synthesizer work?
  • How has music evolved to feature different instruments/voices?
  • How has sound effect technology changed the music industry?
  • Analyze the benefits of music education in high schools.
  • Are rehabilitation centers more effective than prisons?
  • Are congestion taxes useful?
  • Does affirmative action help minorities?
  • Can a capitalist system effectively reduce inequality?
  • Is a three-branch government system effective?
  • What causes polarization in today’s politics?
  • Is the U.S. government racially unbiased?
  • Choose a historical invention and discuss its impact on society today.
  • Choose a famous historical leader who lost power—what led to their eventual downfall?
  • How has your country evolved over the past century?
  • What historical event has had the largest effect on the U.S.?
  • Has the government’s response to national disasters improved or declined throughout history?
  • Discuss the history of the American occupation of Iraq.
  • Explain the history of the Israel-Palestine conflict.
  • Is literature relevant in modern society?
  • Discuss how fiction can be used for propaganda.
  • How does literature teach and inform about society?
  • Explain the influence of children’s literature on adulthood.
  • How has literature addressed homosexuality?
  • Does the media portray minorities realistically?
  • Does the media reinforce stereotypes?
  • Why have podcasts become so popular?
  • Will streaming end traditional television?
  • What is a patriot?
  • What are the pros and cons of global citizenship?
  • What are the causes and effects of bullying?
  • Why has the divorce rate in the U.S. been declining in recent years?
  • Is it more important to follow social norms or religion?
  • What are the responsible limits on abortion, if any?
  • How does an MRI machine work?
  • Would the U.S. benefit from socialized healthcare?
  • Elderly populations
  • The education system
  • State tax bases
  • How do anti-vaxxers affect the health of the country?
  • Analyze the costs and benefits of diet culture.
  • Should companies allow employees to exercise on company time?
  • What is an adequate amount of exercise for an adult per week/per month/per day?
  • Discuss the effects of the obesity epidemic on American society.
  • Are students smarter since the advent of the internet?
  • What departures has the internet made from its original design?
  • Has digital downloading helped the music industry?
  • Discuss the benefits and costs of stricter internet censorship.
  • Analyze the effects of the internet on the paper news industry.
  • What would happen if the internet went out?
  • How will artificial intelligence (AI) change our lives?
  • What are the pros and cons of cryptocurrency?
  • How has social media affected the way people relate with each other?
  • Should social media have an age restriction?
  • Discuss the importance of source software.
  • What is more relevant in today’s world: mobile apps or websites?
  • How will fully autonomous vehicles change our lives?
  • How is text messaging affecting teen literacy?

Mental Health

  • What are the benefits of daily exercise?
  • How has social media affected people’s mental health?
  • What things contribute to poor mental and physical health?
  • Analyze how mental health is talked about in pop culture.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of more counselors in high schools.
  • How does stress affect the body?
  • How do emotional support animals help people?
  • What are black holes?
  • Discuss the biggest successes and failures of the EPA.
  • How has the Flint water crisis affected life in Michigan?
  • Can science help save endangered species?
  • Is the development of an anti-cancer vaccine possible?

Environment

  • What are the effects of deforestation on climate change?
  • Is climate change reversible?
  • How did the COVID-19 pandemic affect global warming and climate change?
  • Are carbon credits effective for offsetting emissions or just marketing?
  • Is nuclear power a safe alternative to fossil fuels?
  • Are hybrid vehicles helping to control pollution in the atmosphere?
  • How is plastic waste harming the environment?
  • Is entrepreneurism a trait people are born with or something they learn?
  • How much more should CEOs make than their average employee?
  • Can you start a business without money?
  • Should the U.S. raise the minimum wage?
  • Discuss how happy employees benefit businesses.
  • How important is branding for a business?
  • Discuss the ease, or difficulty, of landing a job today.
  • What is the economic impact of sporting events?
  • Are professional athletes overpaid?
  • Should male and female athletes receive equal pay?
  • What is a fair and equitable way for transgender athletes to compete in high school sports?
  • What are the benefits of playing team sports?
  • What is the most corrupt professional sport?

Where to Get More Research Paper Topic Ideas

If you need more help brainstorming topics, especially those that are personalized to your interests, you can use CollegeVine’s free AI tutor, Ivy . Ivy can help you come up with original research topic ideas, and she can also help with the rest of your homework, from math to languages.

Disclaimer: This post includes content sponsored by Lumiere Education.

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research project ideas year 12

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 113 great research paper topics.

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General Education

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One of the hardest parts of writing a research paper can be just finding a good topic to write about. Fortunately we've done the hard work for you and have compiled a list of 113 interesting research paper topics. They've been organized into ten categories and cover a wide range of subjects so you can easily find the best topic for you.

In addition to the list of good research topics, we've included advice on what makes a good research paper topic and how you can use your topic to start writing a great paper.

What Makes a Good Research Paper Topic?

Not all research paper topics are created equal, and you want to make sure you choose a great topic before you start writing. Below are the three most important factors to consider to make sure you choose the best research paper topics.

#1: It's Something You're Interested In

A paper is always easier to write if you're interested in the topic, and you'll be more motivated to do in-depth research and write a paper that really covers the entire subject. Even if a certain research paper topic is getting a lot of buzz right now or other people seem interested in writing about it, don't feel tempted to make it your topic unless you genuinely have some sort of interest in it as well.

#2: There's Enough Information to Write a Paper

Even if you come up with the absolute best research paper topic and you're so excited to write about it, you won't be able to produce a good paper if there isn't enough research about the topic. This can happen for very specific or specialized topics, as well as topics that are too new to have enough research done on them at the moment. Easy research paper topics will always be topics with enough information to write a full-length paper.

Trying to write a research paper on a topic that doesn't have much research on it is incredibly hard, so before you decide on a topic, do a bit of preliminary searching and make sure you'll have all the information you need to write your paper.

#3: It Fits Your Teacher's Guidelines

Don't get so carried away looking at lists of research paper topics that you forget any requirements or restrictions your teacher may have put on research topic ideas. If you're writing a research paper on a health-related topic, deciding to write about the impact of rap on the music scene probably won't be allowed, but there may be some sort of leeway. For example, if you're really interested in current events but your teacher wants you to write a research paper on a history topic, you may be able to choose a topic that fits both categories, like exploring the relationship between the US and North Korea. No matter what, always get your research paper topic approved by your teacher first before you begin writing.

113 Good Research Paper Topics

Below are 113 good research topics to help you get you started on your paper. We've organized them into ten categories to make it easier to find the type of research paper topics you're looking for.

Arts/Culture

  • Discuss the main differences in art from the Italian Renaissance and the Northern Renaissance .
  • Analyze the impact a famous artist had on the world.
  • How is sexism portrayed in different types of media (music, film, video games, etc.)? Has the amount/type of sexism changed over the years?
  • How has the music of slaves brought over from Africa shaped modern American music?
  • How has rap music evolved in the past decade?
  • How has the portrayal of minorities in the media changed?

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Current Events

  • What have been the impacts of China's one child policy?
  • How have the goals of feminists changed over the decades?
  • How has the Trump presidency changed international relations?
  • Analyze the history of the relationship between the United States and North Korea.
  • What factors contributed to the current decline in the rate of unemployment?
  • What have been the impacts of states which have increased their minimum wage?
  • How do US immigration laws compare to immigration laws of other countries?
  • How have the US's immigration laws changed in the past few years/decades?
  • How has the Black Lives Matter movement affected discussions and view about racism in the US?
  • What impact has the Affordable Care Act had on healthcare in the US?
  • What factors contributed to the UK deciding to leave the EU (Brexit)?
  • What factors contributed to China becoming an economic power?
  • Discuss the history of Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies  (some of which tokenize the S&P 500 Index on the blockchain) .
  • Do students in schools that eliminate grades do better in college and their careers?
  • Do students from wealthier backgrounds score higher on standardized tests?
  • Do students who receive free meals at school get higher grades compared to when they weren't receiving a free meal?
  • Do students who attend charter schools score higher on standardized tests than students in public schools?
  • Do students learn better in same-sex classrooms?
  • How does giving each student access to an iPad or laptop affect their studies?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of the Montessori Method ?
  • Do children who attend preschool do better in school later on?
  • What was the impact of the No Child Left Behind act?
  • How does the US education system compare to education systems in other countries?
  • What impact does mandatory physical education classes have on students' health?
  • Which methods are most effective at reducing bullying in schools?
  • Do homeschoolers who attend college do as well as students who attended traditional schools?
  • Does offering tenure increase or decrease quality of teaching?
  • How does college debt affect future life choices of students?
  • Should graduate students be able to form unions?

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  • What are different ways to lower gun-related deaths in the US?
  • How and why have divorce rates changed over time?
  • Is affirmative action still necessary in education and/or the workplace?
  • Should physician-assisted suicide be legal?
  • How has stem cell research impacted the medical field?
  • How can human trafficking be reduced in the United States/world?
  • Should people be able to donate organs in exchange for money?
  • Which types of juvenile punishment have proven most effective at preventing future crimes?
  • Has the increase in US airport security made passengers safer?
  • Analyze the immigration policies of certain countries and how they are similar and different from one another.
  • Several states have legalized recreational marijuana. What positive and negative impacts have they experienced as a result?
  • Do tariffs increase the number of domestic jobs?
  • Which prison reforms have proven most effective?
  • Should governments be able to censor certain information on the internet?
  • Which methods/programs have been most effective at reducing teen pregnancy?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of the Keto diet?
  • How effective are different exercise regimes for losing weight and maintaining weight loss?
  • How do the healthcare plans of various countries differ from each other?
  • What are the most effective ways to treat depression ?
  • What are the pros and cons of genetically modified foods?
  • Which methods are most effective for improving memory?
  • What can be done to lower healthcare costs in the US?
  • What factors contributed to the current opioid crisis?
  • Analyze the history and impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic .
  • Are low-carbohydrate or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • How much exercise should the average adult be getting each week?
  • Which methods are most effective to get parents to vaccinate their children?
  • What are the pros and cons of clean needle programs?
  • How does stress affect the body?
  • Discuss the history of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.
  • What were the causes and effects of the Salem Witch Trials?
  • Who was responsible for the Iran-Contra situation?
  • How has New Orleans and the government's response to natural disasters changed since Hurricane Katrina?
  • What events led to the fall of the Roman Empire?
  • What were the impacts of British rule in India ?
  • Was the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki necessary?
  • What were the successes and failures of the women's suffrage movement in the United States?
  • What were the causes of the Civil War?
  • How did Abraham Lincoln's assassination impact the country and reconstruction after the Civil War?
  • Which factors contributed to the colonies winning the American Revolution?
  • What caused Hitler's rise to power?
  • Discuss how a specific invention impacted history.
  • What led to Cleopatra's fall as ruler of Egypt?
  • How has Japan changed and evolved over the centuries?
  • What were the causes of the Rwandan genocide ?

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  • Why did Martin Luther decide to split with the Catholic Church?
  • Analyze the history and impact of a well-known cult (Jonestown, Manson family, etc.)
  • How did the sexual abuse scandal impact how people view the Catholic Church?
  • How has the Catholic church's power changed over the past decades/centuries?
  • What are the causes behind the rise in atheism/ agnosticism in the United States?
  • What were the influences in Siddhartha's life resulted in him becoming the Buddha?
  • How has media portrayal of Islam/Muslims changed since September 11th?

Science/Environment

  • How has the earth's climate changed in the past few decades?
  • How has the use and elimination of DDT affected bird populations in the US?
  • Analyze how the number and severity of natural disasters have increased in the past few decades.
  • Analyze deforestation rates in a certain area or globally over a period of time.
  • How have past oil spills changed regulations and cleanup methods?
  • How has the Flint water crisis changed water regulation safety?
  • What are the pros and cons of fracking?
  • What impact has the Paris Climate Agreement had so far?
  • What have NASA's biggest successes and failures been?
  • How can we improve access to clean water around the world?
  • Does ecotourism actually have a positive impact on the environment?
  • Should the US rely on nuclear energy more?
  • What can be done to save amphibian species currently at risk of extinction?
  • What impact has climate change had on coral reefs?
  • How are black holes created?
  • Are teens who spend more time on social media more likely to suffer anxiety and/or depression?
  • How will the loss of net neutrality affect internet users?
  • Analyze the history and progress of self-driving vehicles.
  • How has the use of drones changed surveillance and warfare methods?
  • Has social media made people more or less connected?
  • What progress has currently been made with artificial intelligence ?
  • Do smartphones increase or decrease workplace productivity?
  • What are the most effective ways to use technology in the classroom?
  • How is Google search affecting our intelligence?
  • When is the best age for a child to begin owning a smartphone?
  • Has frequent texting reduced teen literacy rates?

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How to Write a Great Research Paper

Even great research paper topics won't give you a great research paper if you don't hone your topic before and during the writing process. Follow these three tips to turn good research paper topics into great papers.

#1: Figure Out Your Thesis Early

Before you start writing a single word of your paper, you first need to know what your thesis will be. Your thesis is a statement that explains what you intend to prove/show in your paper. Every sentence in your research paper will relate back to your thesis, so you don't want to start writing without it!

As some examples, if you're writing a research paper on if students learn better in same-sex classrooms, your thesis might be "Research has shown that elementary-age students in same-sex classrooms score higher on standardized tests and report feeling more comfortable in the classroom."

If you're writing a paper on the causes of the Civil War, your thesis might be "While the dispute between the North and South over slavery is the most well-known cause of the Civil War, other key causes include differences in the economies of the North and South, states' rights, and territorial expansion."

#2: Back Every Statement Up With Research

Remember, this is a research paper you're writing, so you'll need to use lots of research to make your points. Every statement you give must be backed up with research, properly cited the way your teacher requested. You're allowed to include opinions of your own, but they must also be supported by the research you give.

#3: Do Your Research Before You Begin Writing

You don't want to start writing your research paper and then learn that there isn't enough research to back up the points you're making, or, even worse, that the research contradicts the points you're trying to make!

Get most of your research on your good research topics done before you begin writing. Then use the research you've collected to create a rough outline of what your paper will cover and the key points you're going to make. This will help keep your paper clear and organized, and it'll ensure you have enough research to produce a strong paper.

What's Next?

Are you also learning about dynamic equilibrium in your science class? We break this sometimes tricky concept down so it's easy to understand in our complete guide to dynamic equilibrium .

Thinking about becoming a nurse practitioner? Nurse practitioners have one of the fastest growing careers in the country, and we have all the information you need to know about what to expect from nurse practitioner school .

Want to know the fastest and easiest ways to convert between Fahrenheit and Celsius? We've got you covered! Check out our guide to the best ways to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit (or vice versa).

These recommendations are based solely on our knowledge and experience. If you purchase an item through one of our links, PrepScholar may receive a commission.

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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Biology Research Projects for High School Students

research project ideas year 12

Indigo Research Team

Biology Project Ideas for High School Students

Are you looking for biology-related topics for your high school research project? If yes, then you have come to the right place. 

We do understand that finding the right topic for research that connects with you can be challenging. This is particularly true for the field of biology since it is very diverse. A good biology project needs to have enough scientific research backing it so that it helps support or disprove your hypothesis. 

This article is all about easy and interesting research projects designed just for keen high school students. We'll explore topics in the domain of the human body, ecosystems, diseases and their treatments, and more. 

Biology Project Ideas For High Schoolers

Here's a carefully curated compilation of cool biology topics to inspire and kick-start your creativity. We have broken the list into categories so that it's easier for you to navigate projects that fall into your interest.

Human Body Project Ideas

The human body is said to be the most complicated biological machine, which opens room for good research topics .  Let's check out some exciting project ideas about the human body.

research project ideas year 12

1. Exploring the Rate of Cognitive Decline at Different Elevations

At higher altitudes, there's a reduction in oxygen partial pressure, impacting blood oxygenation and potentially influencing brain function. If you've ever experienced altitude sickness, you've felt the effects of this phenomenon. The decrease in atmospheric pressure at elevated altitudes results in lower partial pressures of gases, including vital oxygen necessary for our bodily functions.

This project can investigate the impact of sudden increased elevation, such as climbing Denali, on brain health and cognition. Additionally, you can also explore whether continuous exposure to high elevations might contribute to an increased risk of dementia. This biology research project can also analyze published studies examining the correlation between altitude and cognitive brain functions. ‍

2. Making a Visual Guide for Blood Vessel Formation

Create an illustration using online images to showcase the process of blood vessel development. In this project, you can search existing research to understand the current knowledge about how blood vessels form and grow. Then, you can use this gathered information to design a graphic explaining how the network of blood vessels, known as vasculature, takes shape.

This is one of the most interesting human biology project ideas that aims to convey scientific concepts visually, making the information more accessible to a broader audience. ‍

3. Exploring Bacterial Communities in Different Homes

If you’re looking for immune system project ideas, this might be it for you. Bacterial microbiomes are groups of bacteria living on or around living things. These communities of tiny cells are essential for our health, helping with digestion and keeping our immune system in check. The microorganisms in our body outnumber our own cells by approximately 10:1. This project mainly focuses on figuring out how the bacteria on our skin differ between people from different households. To execute this biology project, you can create various bacterial media at home and select other microorganisms. 

Note: While conducting research, avoid abrasions, needle sticks, or cuts to avoid getting bacterial infections. Wearing safety goggles, a face mask, or a face shield can help keep you safe. It is also important after the experiments to wash your hands with soap and water and disinfect surfaces that may have been in contact with the bacteria. At the end of your experiment, fully sterilize everything before disposal.

4. Understanding the Control of Biological Clocks

Next up in the human biology project ideas is understanding how biological clocks work. Sleep is managed by two main processes: the circadian clock, which aligns sleep patterns with the day-night cycle, and sleep homeostasis, which tracks sleep debt as a way to recover from sleep loss. 

You've probably heard about the circadian rhythm, our body's internal clock. Circadian sleep regulation is crucial for animals to predict when they should be awake or sleepy each day. These processes can be controlled at different levels, such as genes, proteins, and neurons in the clock. 

This biology research topic can focus on exploring the regulation of circadian clocks at various genetic levels. This project will help you develop important scientific skills in two areas: the first one is learning how to read and summarize information from scientific articles efficiently,  and the second is finding effective ways to present the gathered information. ‍

5. Exploring the Science of Getting Older

Exploring the science of getting older is one of the most groundbreaking human biology research topics. Growing older is the main factor that increases the risk of various diseases like cancer, neurodegenerative conditions, and sensory impairments. Recently, researchers began to unravel the mysteries of ageing and discover ways to slow down or potentially reverse its effects.

What are the signs of ageing? How do scientists study the process of getting older? How do human lifespan and ageing compare to other animals? Can we actually put a halt to or undo the impacts of ageing? What progress has been made in this area? You can delve into these topics for biology projects or brainstorm other inquiries about the biology of ageing.

Animals, Plants, and Nature Project Ideas

Next up, we’ll discuss the biology research projects related to animals, plants, and nature. These environments are very close to human and they are definitely very interesting to explore.

1. Examining the Impact of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes on Disease Rates

In some areas, like the island of Príncipe, many genetically modified mosquitoes are set free every week. These mosquitoes are modified so they can't easily spread diseases like dengue fever, Zika, and malaria. They're released into nature to mix with regular mosquitoes that carry diseases. But only some agree on whether this is a good idea, as there could be unexpected environmental effects. 

You can conduct research on what could be the good and not-so-good things about this. This biology project is about researching articles and videos to understand how and why scientists use these mosquitoes to reduce diseases and to understand exactly how this works. You may even want to explore exactly how scientists create these genetically modified mosquitoes. 

‍ 2. Effectiveness of Ocean-Protected Zones

Ocean-protected zones, known as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), are specific parts of the sea or coastal waters set aside to conserve marine resources sustainably. Governments, NGOs, or other groups create these areas, and they can vary from entirely off-limits "no-take" zones to zones with controlled fishing or other activities. While MPAs can help manage resources wisely and safeguard biodiversity, there are various reasons why they might need to be revised.

For your marine biology project ideas, investigate the factors that could make MPAs less effective. Then, devise an alternative plan for creating, modeling, and implementing an efficient Marine Protected Area.

For an insightful example of student-led research in this area, explore this project on Applications of Australian Native Aquatic Plants in Purifying Wastewater Sources at Indigo Research . ‍

research project ideas year 12

3. Learning from Nature: Can Animals Provide Solutions?

Exploring the wisdom of the natural world, you can delve into the intriguing question: Can animals offer us innovative solutions to complex problems? How can studying how lizards and newts regrow their limbs help us make wound treatments better or even help someone who is paralyzed from injury to their spinal cord? Why is tilapia skin useful for burns? Explore these new topics in biology on how animals contribute to shaping modern medicine and its future possibilities. 

Also, consider if there are any ethical worries tied to these discoveries and developments. If there are, what are they, and should we be concerned?  ‍

4. Understanding the Impact of Climate Change on the Habitats of Rare Species

Climate change, marked by factors like global warming and prolonged drought, threatens some of the rarest plants and animals on our planet. It is crucial to figure out how the future living spaces for these rare species might change so we can focus our efforts on preserving specific areas. 

In this project, you can choose a rare species you're interested in and gather online data about where it currently exists. This is a great idea for a biology research project if you’re interested in the environment, ecology or rare plant and animal species, in which you can find out how to use species distribution modeling to map where it lives now and where it might thrive. 

5. Complex Relationships in Coral Reefs

Coral reefs worldwide are struggling, and one big reason is "coral bleaching," making the reefs look white, as you might have seen in the news. Coral bleaching happens when the teamwork between the coral animals and the tiny, helpful algae inside them breaks down. These coral and algae buddies can handle different temperatures, but we don't really know why. 

This biological project can be about reading what scientists have researched about this teamwork and determining what factors can tell us when corals might turn white and how well they can handle temperature changes.

Genetic Project Ideas

If you want to base your project on genetics, we have a few ideas you can look at. 

Genetics projects ideas for high school students

1. Understanding the Relationship between Genetics and Height 

Epigenetics studies how heritable cellular phenotype or gene expression changes occur without altering the DNA sequence. Such changes are affected by lifestyle and diet. In these biochemical projects, you can analyze the open dataset on identical (or monozygotic) twins to find what biological features are shared between monozygotic twins and which are not. The latter might be affected by non-genetic factors that control these features

You will learn how to use the R tool to look at and analyze data, and use statistical tools to identify significant differences between groups, and, in the end, showcase your research with graphics to communicate it effectively to the audience. 

2. Exploring personalized medication

Just like fingerprints, each of us has a unique genetic code that determines things in our body, like our hair color, height, and eye color. Even diseases like cancer have their own unique codes inside the malignant cells that define important features of the  a tumor. 

For decades, everyone with a specific cancer has been treated the same way with surgery, chemo- or radiotherapy, even if their malignant cells are different. That's where one of the most interesting biology topics for research, personalized medication, comes in. 

It's a new and exciting way to treat diseases. Personalized medicine aims to use the disease's genetic code to customize the treatment to that particular individual. This domain of biology has a lot of published research and a lot of room for new research as well. 

One thing you can do for your biology project subject is to pick one disease whose treatment can really benefit from personalized medication and write a research paper on it based on the work of reputable researchers. 

3. The genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders

Many neurodevelopmental or psychiatric disorders like autism spectrum disorder or schizophrenia have a strong genetic basis. What genes are involved? What proteins do they produce and what are their functions? How do these genetic changes affect brain development and function? Can this knowledge help scientists develop new drugs to treat conditions like schizophrenia that is still being treated with the same drugs as 50 years ago?

This project will allow you to read exciting research that has been published over the last few years, and learn about genetics and neuroscience, two of the most exciting areas of biology and medicine. You will develop skills in scientific research and ways to present complex ideas to an audience. 

Projects based on exciting biological topics allow students to explore the science of living things and get hands-on experience with everything they learned in high school. From investigating altitude's impact on cognition in human beings to exploring genetically engineered mosquitoes, these projects help in understanding biology. 

Students develop critical thinking and research skills in each biology project, apply classroom knowledge, and communicate findings effectively. These projects provide students the freedom to explore individual interests and pave the way for future scientific endeavors. 

If you're interested in conducting biology research, consider finding a mentor who can guide you through your innovative biology project ideas. At Indigo Research, you can start your research at any time of the year, building on the knowledge and skills you've acquired from your internships or academic coursework.

research project ideas year 12

Grad Coach

Research Topics & Ideas: Education

170+ Research Ideas To Fast-Track Your Project

Topic Kickstarter: Research topics in education

If you’re just starting out exploring education-related topics for your dissertation, thesis or research project, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, we’ll help kickstart your research topic ideation process by providing a hearty list of research topics and ideas , including examples from actual dissertations and theses..

PS – This is just the start…

We know it’s exciting to run through a list of research topics, but please keep in mind that this list is just a starting point . To develop a suitable education-related research topic, you’ll need to identify a clear and convincing research gap , and a viable plan of action to fill that gap.

If this sounds foreign to you, check out our free research topic webinar that explores how to find and refine a high-quality research topic, from scratch. Alternatively, if you’d like hands-on help, consider our 1-on-1 coaching service .

Overview: Education Research Topics

  • How to find a research topic (video)
  • List of 50+ education-related research topics/ideas
  • List of 120+ level-specific research topics 
  • Examples of actual dissertation topics in education
  • Tips to fast-track your topic ideation (video)
  • Free Webinar : Topic Ideation 101
  • Where to get extra help

Education-Related Research Topics & Ideas

Below you’ll find a list of education-related research topics and idea kickstarters. These are fairly broad and flexible to various contexts, so keep in mind that you will need to refine them a little. Nevertheless, they should inspire some ideas for your project.

  • The impact of school funding on student achievement
  • The effects of social and emotional learning on student well-being
  • The effects of parental involvement on student behaviour
  • The impact of teacher training on student learning
  • The impact of classroom design on student learning
  • The impact of poverty on education
  • The use of student data to inform instruction
  • The role of parental involvement in education
  • The effects of mindfulness practices in the classroom
  • The use of technology in the classroom
  • The role of critical thinking in education
  • The use of formative and summative assessments in the classroom
  • The use of differentiated instruction in the classroom
  • The use of gamification in education
  • The effects of teacher burnout on student learning
  • The impact of school leadership on student achievement
  • The effects of teacher diversity on student outcomes
  • The role of teacher collaboration in improving student outcomes
  • The implementation of blended and online learning
  • The effects of teacher accountability on student achievement
  • The effects of standardized testing on student learning
  • The effects of classroom management on student behaviour
  • The effects of school culture on student achievement
  • The use of student-centred learning in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher-student relationships on student outcomes
  • The achievement gap in minority and low-income students
  • The use of culturally responsive teaching in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher professional development on student learning
  • The use of project-based learning in the classroom
  • The effects of teacher expectations on student achievement
  • The use of adaptive learning technology in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher turnover on student learning
  • The effects of teacher recruitment and retention on student learning
  • The impact of early childhood education on later academic success
  • The impact of parental involvement on student engagement
  • The use of positive reinforcement in education
  • The impact of school climate on student engagement
  • The role of STEM education in preparing students for the workforce
  • The effects of school choice on student achievement
  • The use of technology in the form of online tutoring

Level-Specific Research Topics

Looking for research topics for a specific level of education? We’ve got you covered. Below you can find research topic ideas for primary, secondary and tertiary-level education contexts. Click the relevant level to view the respective list.

Research Topics: Pick An Education Level

Primary education.

  • Investigating the effects of peer tutoring on academic achievement in primary school
  • Exploring the benefits of mindfulness practices in primary school classrooms
  • Examining the effects of different teaching strategies on primary school students’ problem-solving skills
  • The use of storytelling as a teaching strategy in primary school literacy instruction
  • The role of cultural diversity in promoting tolerance and understanding in primary schools
  • The impact of character education programs on moral development in primary school students
  • Investigating the use of technology in enhancing primary school mathematics education
  • The impact of inclusive curriculum on promoting equity and diversity in primary schools
  • The impact of outdoor education programs on environmental awareness in primary school students
  • The influence of school climate on student motivation and engagement in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of early literacy interventions on reading comprehension in primary school students
  • The impact of parental involvement in school decision-making processes on student achievement in primary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of inclusive education for students with special needs in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of teacher-student feedback on academic motivation in primary schools
  • The role of technology in developing digital literacy skills in primary school students
  • Effective strategies for fostering a growth mindset in primary school students
  • Investigating the role of parental support in reducing academic stress in primary school children
  • The role of arts education in fostering creativity and self-expression in primary school students
  • Examining the effects of early childhood education programs on primary school readiness
  • Examining the effects of homework on primary school students’ academic performance
  • The role of formative assessment in improving learning outcomes in primary school classrooms
  • The impact of teacher-student relationships on academic outcomes in primary school
  • Investigating the effects of classroom environment on student behavior and learning outcomes in primary schools
  • Investigating the role of creativity and imagination in primary school curriculum
  • The impact of nutrition and healthy eating programs on academic performance in primary schools
  • The impact of social-emotional learning programs on primary school students’ well-being and academic performance
  • The role of parental involvement in academic achievement of primary school children
  • Examining the effects of classroom management strategies on student behavior in primary school
  • The role of school leadership in creating a positive school climate Exploring the benefits of bilingual education in primary schools
  • The effectiveness of project-based learning in developing critical thinking skills in primary school students
  • The role of inquiry-based learning in fostering curiosity and critical thinking in primary school students
  • The effects of class size on student engagement and achievement in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of recess and physical activity breaks on attention and learning in primary school
  • Exploring the benefits of outdoor play in developing gross motor skills in primary school children
  • The effects of educational field trips on knowledge retention in primary school students
  • Examining the effects of inclusive classroom practices on students’ attitudes towards diversity in primary schools
  • The impact of parental involvement in homework on primary school students’ academic achievement
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different assessment methods in primary school classrooms
  • The influence of physical activity and exercise on cognitive development in primary school children
  • Exploring the benefits of cooperative learning in promoting social skills in primary school students

Secondary Education

  • Investigating the effects of school discipline policies on student behavior and academic success in secondary education
  • The role of social media in enhancing communication and collaboration among secondary school students
  • The impact of school leadership on teacher effectiveness and student outcomes in secondary schools
  • Investigating the effects of technology integration on teaching and learning in secondary education
  • Exploring the benefits of interdisciplinary instruction in promoting critical thinking skills in secondary schools
  • The impact of arts education on creativity and self-expression in secondary school students
  • The effectiveness of flipped classrooms in promoting student learning in secondary education
  • The role of career guidance programs in preparing secondary school students for future employment
  • Investigating the effects of student-centered learning approaches on student autonomy and academic success in secondary schools
  • The impact of socio-economic factors on educational attainment in secondary education
  • Investigating the impact of project-based learning on student engagement and academic achievement in secondary schools
  • Investigating the effects of multicultural education on cultural understanding and tolerance in secondary schools
  • The influence of standardized testing on teaching practices and student learning in secondary education
  • Investigating the effects of classroom management strategies on student behavior and academic engagement in secondary education
  • The influence of teacher professional development on instructional practices and student outcomes in secondary schools
  • The role of extracurricular activities in promoting holistic development and well-roundedness in secondary school students
  • Investigating the effects of blended learning models on student engagement and achievement in secondary education
  • The role of physical education in promoting physical health and well-being among secondary school students
  • Investigating the effects of gender on academic achievement and career aspirations in secondary education
  • Exploring the benefits of multicultural literature in promoting cultural awareness and empathy among secondary school students
  • The impact of school counseling services on student mental health and well-being in secondary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of vocational education and training in preparing secondary school students for the workforce
  • The role of digital literacy in preparing secondary school students for the digital age
  • The influence of parental involvement on academic success and well-being of secondary school students
  • The impact of social-emotional learning programs on secondary school students’ well-being and academic success
  • The role of character education in fostering ethical and responsible behavior in secondary school students
  • Examining the effects of digital citizenship education on responsible and ethical technology use among secondary school students
  • The impact of parental involvement in school decision-making processes on student outcomes in secondary schools
  • The role of educational technology in promoting personalized learning experiences in secondary schools
  • The impact of inclusive education on the social and academic outcomes of students with disabilities in secondary schools
  • The influence of parental support on academic motivation and achievement in secondary education
  • The role of school climate in promoting positive behavior and well-being among secondary school students
  • Examining the effects of peer mentoring programs on academic achievement and social-emotional development in secondary schools
  • Examining the effects of teacher-student relationships on student motivation and achievement in secondary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of service-learning programs in promoting civic engagement among secondary school students
  • The impact of educational policies on educational equity and access in secondary education
  • Examining the effects of homework on academic achievement and student well-being in secondary education
  • Investigating the effects of different assessment methods on student performance in secondary schools
  • Examining the effects of single-sex education on academic performance and gender stereotypes in secondary schools
  • The role of mentoring programs in supporting the transition from secondary to post-secondary education

Tertiary Education

  • The role of student support services in promoting academic success and well-being in higher education
  • The impact of internationalization initiatives on students’ intercultural competence and global perspectives in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effects of active learning classrooms and learning spaces on student engagement and learning outcomes in tertiary education
  • Exploring the benefits of service-learning experiences in fostering civic engagement and social responsibility in higher education
  • The influence of learning communities and collaborative learning environments on student academic and social integration in higher education
  • Exploring the benefits of undergraduate research experiences in fostering critical thinking and scientific inquiry skills
  • Investigating the effects of academic advising and mentoring on student retention and degree completion in higher education
  • The role of student engagement and involvement in co-curricular activities on holistic student development in higher education
  • The impact of multicultural education on fostering cultural competence and diversity appreciation in higher education
  • The role of internships and work-integrated learning experiences in enhancing students’ employability and career outcomes
  • Examining the effects of assessment and feedback practices on student learning and academic achievement in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty professional development on instructional practices and student outcomes in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty-student relationships on student success and well-being in tertiary education
  • The impact of college transition programs on students’ academic and social adjustment to higher education
  • The impact of online learning platforms on student learning outcomes in higher education
  • The impact of financial aid and scholarships on access and persistence in higher education
  • The influence of student leadership and involvement in extracurricular activities on personal development and campus engagement
  • Exploring the benefits of competency-based education in developing job-specific skills in tertiary students
  • Examining the effects of flipped classroom models on student learning and retention in higher education
  • Exploring the benefits of online collaboration and virtual team projects in developing teamwork skills in tertiary students
  • Investigating the effects of diversity and inclusion initiatives on campus climate and student experiences in tertiary education
  • The influence of study abroad programs on intercultural competence and global perspectives of college students
  • Investigating the effects of peer mentoring and tutoring programs on student retention and academic performance in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effectiveness of active learning strategies in promoting student engagement and achievement in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effects of blended learning models and hybrid courses on student learning and satisfaction in higher education
  • The role of digital literacy and information literacy skills in supporting student success in the digital age
  • Investigating the effects of experiential learning opportunities on career readiness and employability of college students
  • The impact of e-portfolios on student reflection, self-assessment, and showcasing of learning in higher education
  • The role of technology in enhancing collaborative learning experiences in tertiary classrooms
  • The impact of research opportunities on undergraduate student engagement and pursuit of advanced degrees
  • Examining the effects of competency-based assessment on measuring student learning and achievement in tertiary education
  • Examining the effects of interdisciplinary programs and courses on critical thinking and problem-solving skills in college students
  • The role of inclusive education and accessibility in promoting equitable learning experiences for diverse student populations
  • The role of career counseling and guidance in supporting students’ career decision-making in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty diversity and representation on student success and inclusive learning environments in higher education

Research topic idea mega list

Education-Related Dissertations & Theses

While the ideas we’ve presented above are a decent starting point for finding a research topic in education, they are fairly generic and non-specific. So, it helps to look at actual dissertations and theses in the education space to see how this all comes together in practice.

Below, we’ve included a selection of education-related research projects to help refine your thinking. These are actual dissertations and theses, written as part of Master’s and PhD-level programs, so they can provide some useful insight as to what a research topic looks like in practice.

  • From Rural to Urban: Education Conditions of Migrant Children in China (Wang, 2019)
  • Energy Renovation While Learning English: A Guidebook for Elementary ESL Teachers (Yang, 2019)
  • A Reanalyses of Intercorrelational Matrices of Visual and Verbal Learners’ Abilities, Cognitive Styles, and Learning Preferences (Fox, 2020)
  • A study of the elementary math program utilized by a mid-Missouri school district (Barabas, 2020)
  • Instructor formative assessment practices in virtual learning environments : a posthumanist sociomaterial perspective (Burcks, 2019)
  • Higher education students services: a qualitative study of two mid-size universities’ direct exchange programs (Kinde, 2020)
  • Exploring editorial leadership : a qualitative study of scholastic journalism advisers teaching leadership in Missouri secondary schools (Lewis, 2020)
  • Selling the virtual university: a multimodal discourse analysis of marketing for online learning (Ludwig, 2020)
  • Advocacy and accountability in school counselling: assessing the use of data as related to professional self-efficacy (Matthews, 2020)
  • The use of an application screening assessment as a predictor of teaching retention at a midwestern, K-12, public school district (Scarbrough, 2020)
  • Core values driving sustained elite performance cultures (Beiner, 2020)
  • Educative features of upper elementary Eureka math curriculum (Dwiggins, 2020)
  • How female principals nurture adult learning opportunities in successful high schools with challenging student demographics (Woodward, 2020)
  • The disproportionality of Black Males in Special Education: A Case Study Analysis of Educator Perceptions in a Southeastern Urban High School (McCrae, 2021)

As you can see, these research topics are a lot more focused than the generic topic ideas we presented earlier. So, in order for you to develop a high-quality research topic, you’ll need to get specific and laser-focused on a specific context with specific variables of interest.  In the video below, we explore some other important things you’ll need to consider when crafting your research topic.

Get 1-On-1 Help

If you’re still unsure about how to find a quality research topic within education, check out our Research Topic Kickstarter service, which is the perfect starting point for developing a unique, well-justified research topic.

Research Topic Kickstarter - Need Help Finding A Research Topic?

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Research topics and ideas in psychology

64 Comments

Watson Kabwe

This is an helpful tool 🙏

Musarrat Parveen

Special education

Akbar khan

Really appreciated by this . It is the best platform for research related items

Trishna Roy

Research title related to school of students

Oyebanji Khadijat Anike

I think this platform is actually good enough.

Angel taña

Research title related to students

My field is research measurement and evaluation. Need dissertation topics in the field

Saira Murtaza

Assalam o Alaikum I’m a student Bs educational Resarch and evaluation I’m confused to choose My thesis title please help me in choose the thesis title

Ngirumuvugizi Jaccques

Good idea I’m going to teach my colleagues

Anangnerisia@gmail.com

You can find our list of nursing-related research topic ideas here: https://gradcoach.com/research-topics-nursing/

FOSU DORIS

Write on action research topic, using guidance and counseling to address unwanted teenage pregnancy in school

Samson ochuodho

Thanks a lot

Johaima

I learned a lot from this site, thank you so much!

Rhod Tuyan

Thank you for the information.. I would like to request a topic based on school major in social studies

Mercedes Bunsie

parental involvement and students academic performance

Abshir Mustafe Cali

Science education topics?

alina

plz tell me if you got some good topics, im here for finding research topic for masters degree

Karen Joy Andrade

How about School management and supervision pls.?

JOHANNES SERAME MONYATSI

Hi i am an Deputy Principal in a primary school. My wish is to srudy foe Master’s degree in Education.Please advice me on which topic can be relevant for me. Thanks.

NKWAIN Chia Charles

Every topic proposed above on primary education is a starting point for me. I appreciate immensely the team that has sat down to make a detail of these selected topics just for beginners like us. Be blessed.

Nkwain Chia Charles

Kindly help me with the research questions on the topic” Effects of workplace conflict on the employees’ job performance”. The effects can be applicable in every institution,enterprise or organisation.

Kelvin Kells Grant

Greetings, I am a student majoring in Sociology and minoring in Public Administration. I’m considering any recommended research topic in the field of Sociology.

Sulemana Alhassan

I’m a student pursuing Mphil in Basic education and I’m considering any recommended research proposal topic in my field of study

Cristine

Research Defense for students in senior high

Kupoluyi Regina

Kindly help me with a research topic in educational psychology. Ph.D level. Thank you.

Project-based learning is a teaching/learning type,if well applied in a classroom setting will yield serious positive impact. What can a teacher do to implement this in a disadvantaged zone like “North West Region of Cameroon ( hinterland) where war has brought about prolonged and untold sufferings on the indegins?

Damaris Nzoka

I wish to get help on topics of research on educational administration

I wish to get help on topics of research on educational administration PhD level

Sadaf

I am also looking for such type of title

Afriyie Saviour

I am a student of undergraduate, doing research on how to use guidance and counseling to address unwanted teenage pregnancy in school

wysax

the topics are very good regarding research & education .

William AU Mill

Can i request your suggestion topic for my Thesis about Teachers as an OFW. thanx you

ChRISTINE

Would like to request for suggestions on a topic in Economics of education,PhD level

Aza Hans

Would like to request for suggestions on a topic in Economics of education

George

Hi 👋 I request that you help me with a written research proposal about education the format

Cynthia abuabire

Am offering degree in education senior high School Accounting. I want a topic for my project work

Sarah Moyambo

l would like to request suggestions on a topic in managing teaching and learning, PhD level (educational leadership and management)

request suggestions on a topic in managing teaching and learning, PhD level (educational leadership and management)

Ernest Gyabaah

I would to inquire on research topics on Educational psychology, Masters degree

Aron kirui

I am PhD student, I am searching my Research topic, It should be innovative,my area of interest is online education,use of technology in education

revathy a/p letchumanan

request suggestion on topic in masters in medical education .

D.Newlands PhD.

Look at British Library as they keep a copy of all PhDs in the UK Core.ac.uk to access Open University and 6 other university e-archives, pdf downloads mostly available, all free.

Monica

May I also ask for a topic based on mathematics education for college teaching, please?

Aman

Please I am a masters student of the department of Teacher Education, Faculty of Education Please I am in need of proposed project topics to help with my final year thesis

Ellyjoy

Am a PhD student in Educational Foundations would like a sociological topic. Thank

muhammad sani

please i need a proposed thesis project regardging computer science

also916

Greetings and Regards I am a doctoral student in the field of philosophy of education. I am looking for a new topic for my thesis. Because of my work in the elementary school, I am looking for a topic that is from the field of elementary education and is related to the philosophy of education.

shantel orox

Masters student in the field of curriculum, any ideas of a research topic on low achiever students

Rey

In the field of curriculum any ideas of a research topic on deconalization in contextualization of digital teaching and learning through in higher education

Omada Victoria Enyojo

Amazing guidelines

JAMES MALUKI MUTIA

I am a graduate with two masters. 1) Master of arts in religious studies and 2) Master in education in foundations of education. I intend to do a Ph.D. on my second master’s, however, I need to bring both masters together through my Ph.D. research. can I do something like, ” The contribution of Philosophy of education for a quality religion education in Kenya”? kindly, assist and be free to suggest a similar topic that will bring together the two masters. thanks in advance

betiel

Hi, I am an Early childhood trainer as well as a researcher, I need more support on this topic: The impact of early childhood education on later academic success.

TURIKUMWE JEAN BOSCO

I’m a student in upper level secondary school and I need your support in this research topics: “Impact of incorporating project -based learning in teaching English language skills in secondary schools”.

Fitsum Ayele

Although research activities and topics should stem from reflection on one’s practice, I found this site valuable as it effectively addressed many issues we have been experiencing as practitioners.

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How to ace the Research Project in SACE

As daunting as it may sound, let’s dive into what the SACE research project is and how you can make it as useful to you as possible (and maybe even fun!)

2 years ago   •   4 min read

Ahhh the research project - the subject of developing a specific, (but not too specific!) open-ended research question on the topic of your choice. Your entire semester will revolve around this developed question, and you’ll keep on coming back to it to write reflections on your progress as you go. As daunting as this may sound, let’s first dive into what the research project is and how you can make it as useful to you as possible (and maybe even fun!)

So what is the research project?

Unlike your other SACE stage 2 subjects being 20 credits, the research project is a 10-credit SACE subject you will either complete in year 11 or 12 depending on which high school you attend. The subject consists of three parts: the folio, outcome, and review for research project A or the evaluation if you are undertaking research project B. Despite research projects A and B having different performance standards, both encourage you to explore a topic of choice in depth, gathering various sources and writing reflections on your learning. In the first few weeks of the subject, your teacher will guide you when developing your question. The folio is 10 pages in length and typically consists of your reflections and the main sources you have collected through your research (both primary and secondary sources!). You will then write an outcome that is essentially answering your original research question. Lastly, comes the evaluation or review where you will write an overall reflection and evaluate the findings in the outcome.

So why is the research project necessary?

While the big workload can be overwhelming at first, the research project is good at teaching you analytical and research skills. Doing source analysis enables you to critically evaluate your chosen sources. You will scrutinize the reliability, credibility, and validity of each of your sources. While the relevance of doing all these analyses may be hard to see at this time, the skills you develop are extremely useful during university and in the workplace. You want to be confident that the information you use can be relied upon and is not something just made up by someone. Treat the research project as a practice for your post-high school life. You want to make sure that you have these skills in your toolbox for when you really need them!

How do I develop the best question for my topic of interest?

The most important part of the research is picking the right topic. You want to pick something you have a strong interest in. This way, it will be much easier for you to feel more motivated to sit down and do your research. However, at the same time, you want to pick a topic that will have lots of research behind it, you don't want to be stuck for sources! To avoid this, write down a list of topics you have an interest in and do some research on each - see what is available online or at a local library. This way, you will be more prepared when your teacher comes over to your desk to ask you what you have done so far! Once you have picked your topic, create another list of possible questions you could investigate. These questions should be open-ended, not just with a simple yes or no answer. Keep in mind you will be writing a 1500 to 2000-word answer to this question, so make it a question you can go into complete depth with. Typical questions should be specific and may begin with ‘to what extent’, ‘evaluate’, ‘what’ or ‘how’. For example, if you picked social media as your topic, your question could be ‘to what extent does social media use impact the attention spans of teenagers aged 13-17?’ rather than ‘does social media impact attention spans?’. You may then have to break down your main question into four more guiding questions to help you structure your folio and outcome. For example, ‘how much time do teenagers aged 13-17 spend on social media every day?’. It is important that you keep documentation of this process as you will be displaying it in your folio.

If you're interested in learning how to write the best SHE task - check out this comprehensive guide.

But how do I complete my folio?

The folio is the first assessment of both research projects A and B. There is no right or wrong way to complete it but you do have to follow specific SACE criteria if you want the highest marks. The majority of students start their project with how they came to their question and a reflection on this process. You can then include the main sources you have used with source analysis. Organising interviews with professionals in your topic’s field and sending out surveys really impresses SACE markers as it shows your engagement with the subject. It demonstrates your research skills and independence to create your own data to support your outcome. Your folio should also include a capability statement to show how you have developed in your chosen SACE capability.

What should I write in my outcome? How do I do my evaluation or review?

Your outcome is the synthesis of all your ideas and findings. You can structure it however you want. This may be in the form of a magazine, report, project, video or in any other form which demonstrates all that research you have done. You must clearly conclude your findings and cite your sources. For research project A, the review begins with a 150-word summary of the process and then a 1500-word review follows which focuses on a reflection of your knowledge and skills as well as the quality of your outcome. For research project B, you should also begin with a 150-word summary of the process and then follow with a 1500-word evaluation, critically evaluating your decisions and processes as well as determining the quality of your outcome. Above all, keep in mind that your teacher is there to help you through this process. It is exciting as you begin to come up with an answer to your question. If you need any help during this time, you can find your best local tutor at: https://kisacademics.com/find-a-tutor . SACE tutors understand how stressful it can be and are more than happy to help!

Written by KIS Academics Tutor for SACE English, Biology and Psychology, Charlotte Kenning. Charlotte is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Speech Pathology at Flinders University and has received stellar reviews from her past KIS Academics students. You can view Charlotte's profile here and request her as a tutor.

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The Essential Guide to Doing Your Research Project

Student resources.

Examples of Student Research Projects

Year 12 Research Projects 2023/24

research project ideas year 12

Science Fair Project Ideas for 12th Graders

Blend Images - KidStock / Getty Images

  • Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
  • B.A., Physics and Mathematics, Hastings College

Twelfth-grade science fair projects can be interesting and even groundbreaking. High school seniors should be able to identify a project idea on their own and can conduct the science fair project and report on it without much assistance. Most 12th-grade science fair projects will involve proposing a hypothesis and testing it with an experiment. Advanced models and inventions offer other options for a successful 12th-grade project.

12th Grade Science Fair Project Ideas

  • What is the best way to keep the fizz in an opened carbonated soft drink?
  • Find and test a non-toxic antifreeze.
  • Study the toxicity of energy drinks.
  • Measure the toxicity of silver-mercury amalgam fillings.
  • Determine which type of invisible ink is the most invisible.
  • Measure crystal growth rate as a function of temperature.
  • Which pesticide is most effective against cockroaches? ants? fleas? Is it the same chemical? Which pesticide is safest for use around food? Which is friendliest to the environment?
  • Test products for impurities. For example, you could compare the amount of lead in different brands of bottled water . If a label says a product does not contain heavy metal , is the label accurate? Do you see any evidence of leaching of hazardous chemicals from plastic into water over time?
  • Which sunless tanning product produces the most realistic-looking tan?
  • Which brand of disposable contact lenses last the longest before a person decides to switch them out?
  • Formulate a non-toxic or biodegradable ink.
  • Make an edible water bottle and compare the environmental impacts of it versus other water bottles.
  • Test the efficiency of different shapes of fan blades.
  • Can bath water be used for watering plants or the garden?
  • Can you tell how much biodiversity is in a water sample by how murky the water is?
  • Study the effect of landscaping on a building's energy consumption.
  • Determine whether ethanol really does burn more cleanly than gasoline.
  • Is there a correlation between attendance and GPA? Is there a correlation between how close to the front of the classroom a student sits and GPA?
  • Compare the wet strength of different brands of paper towels.
  • Which method of cooking destroys the most bacteria?
  • Are hybrid cars really more energy-efficient than gas or diesel-powered cars?
  • Which disinfectant kills the most bacteria? Which disinfectant is the safest to use?
  • 10th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • Chemistry Science Fair Project Ideas
  • 8th Grade Science Fair Project Ideas
  • High School Science Fair Projects
  • Household Product Testing Science Fair Projects
  • 11th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • 7th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • Pollution Science Fair Projects
  • Middle School Science Fair Project Ideas
  • 5th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • 9th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • Sports Science Fair Project Ideas
  • Materials Science Fair Projects
  • Elementary School Science Fair Projects
  • 6th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • Grade School Science Fair Project Ideas
  • Research Skills

50 Mini-Lessons For Teaching Students Research Skills

Please note, I am no longer blogging and this post hasn’t updated since April 2020.

For a number of years, Seth Godin has been talking about the need to “ connect the dots” rather than “collect the dots” . That is, rather than memorising information, students must be able to learn how to solve new problems, see patterns, and combine multiple perspectives.

Solid research skills underpin this. Having the fluency to find and use information successfully is an essential skill for life and work.

Today’s students have more information at their fingertips than ever before and this means the role of the teacher as a guide is more important than ever.

You might be wondering how you can fit teaching research skills into a busy curriculum? There aren’t enough hours in the day! The good news is, there are so many mini-lessons you can do to build students’ skills over time.

This post outlines 50 ideas for activities that could be done in just a few minutes (or stretched out to a longer lesson if you have the time!).

Learn More About The Research Process

I have a popular post called Teach Students How To Research Online In 5 Steps. It outlines a five-step approach to break down the research process into manageable chunks.

Learn about a simple search process for students in primary school, middle school, or high school Kathleen Morris

This post shares ideas for mini-lessons that could be carried out in the classroom throughout the year to help build students’ skills in the five areas of: clarify, search, delve, evaluate , and cite . It also includes ideas for learning about staying organised throughout the research process.

Notes about the 50 research activities:

  • These ideas can be adapted for different age groups from middle primary/elementary to senior high school.
  • Many of these ideas can be repeated throughout the year.
  • Depending on the age of your students, you can decide whether the activity will be more teacher or student led. Some activities suggest coming up with a list of words, questions, or phrases. Teachers of younger students could generate these themselves.
  • Depending on how much time you have, many of the activities can be either quickly modelled by the teacher, or extended to an hour-long lesson.
  • Some of the activities could fit into more than one category.
  • Looking for simple articles for younger students for some of the activities? Try DOGO News or Time for Kids . Newsela is also a great resource but you do need to sign up for free account.
  • Why not try a few activities in a staff meeting? Everyone can always brush up on their own research skills!

research project ideas year 12

  • Choose a topic (e.g. koalas, basketball, Mount Everest) . Write as many questions as you can think of relating to that topic.
  • Make a mindmap of a topic you’re currently learning about. This could be either on paper or using an online tool like Bubbl.us .
  • Read a short book or article. Make a list of 5 words from the text that you don’t totally understand. Look up the meaning of the words in a dictionary (online or paper).
  • Look at a printed or digital copy of a short article with the title removed. Come up with as many different titles as possible that would fit the article.
  • Come up with a list of 5 different questions you could type into Google (e.g. Which country in Asia has the largest population?) Circle the keywords in each question.
  • Write down 10 words to describe a person, place, or topic. Come up with synonyms for these words using a tool like  Thesaurus.com .
  • Write pairs of synonyms on post-it notes (this could be done by the teacher or students). Each student in the class has one post-it note and walks around the classroom to find the person with the synonym to their word.

research project ideas year 12

  • Explore how to search Google using your voice (i.e. click/tap on the microphone in the Google search box or on your phone/tablet keyboard) . List the pros and cons of using voice and text to search.
  • Open two different search engines in your browser such as Google and Bing. Type in a query and compare the results. Do all search engines work exactly the same?
  • Have students work in pairs to try out a different search engine (there are 11 listed here ). Report back to the class on the pros and cons.
  • Think of something you’re curious about, (e.g. What endangered animals live in the Amazon Rainforest?). Open Google in two tabs. In one search, type in one or two keywords ( e.g. Amazon Rainforest) . In the other search type in multiple relevant keywords (e.g. endangered animals Amazon rainforest).  Compare the results. Discuss the importance of being specific.
  • Similar to above, try two different searches where one phrase is in quotation marks and the other is not. For example, Origin of “raining cats and dogs” and Origin of raining cats and dogs . Discuss the difference that using quotation marks makes (It tells Google to search for the precise keywords in order.)
  • Try writing a question in Google with a few minor spelling mistakes. What happens? What happens if you add or leave out punctuation ?
  • Try the AGoogleADay.com daily search challenges from Google. The questions help older students learn about choosing keywords, deconstructing questions, and altering keywords.
  • Explore how Google uses autocomplete to suggest searches quickly. Try it out by typing in various queries (e.g. How to draw… or What is the tallest…). Discuss how these suggestions come about, how to use them, and whether they’re usually helpful.
  • Watch this video  from Code.org to learn more about how search works .
  • Take a look at  20 Instant Google Searches your Students Need to Know  by Eric Curts to learn about “ instant searches ”. Try one to try out. Perhaps each student could be assigned one to try and share with the class.
  • Experiment with typing some questions into Google that have a clear answer (e.g. “What is a parallelogram?” or “What is the highest mountain in the world?” or “What is the population of Australia?”). Look at the different ways the answers are displayed instantly within the search results — dictionary definitions, image cards, graphs etc.

What is the population of Australia

  • Watch the video How Does Google Know Everything About Me?  by Scientific American. Discuss the PageRank algorithm and how Google uses your data to customise search results.
  • Brainstorm a list of popular domains   (e.g. .com, .com.au, or your country’s domain) . Discuss if any domains might be more reliable than others and why (e.g. .gov or .edu) .
  • Discuss (or research) ways to open Google search results in a new tab to save your original search results  (i.e. right-click > open link in new tab or press control/command and click the link).
  • Try out a few Google searches (perhaps start with things like “car service” “cat food” or “fresh flowers”). A re there advertisements within the results? Discuss where these appear and how to spot them.
  • Look at ways to filter search results by using the tabs at the top of the page in Google (i.e. news, images, shopping, maps, videos etc.). Do the same filters appear for all Google searches? Try out a few different searches and see.
  • Type a question into Google and look for the “People also ask” and “Searches related to…” sections. Discuss how these could be useful. When should you use them or ignore them so you don’t go off on an irrelevant tangent? Is the information in the drop-down section under “People also ask” always the best?
  • Often, more current search results are more useful. Click on “tools” under the Google search box and then “any time” and your time frame of choice such as “Past month” or “Past year”.
  • Have students annotate their own “anatomy of a search result” example like the one I made below. Explore the different ways search results display; some have more details like sitelinks and some do not.

Anatomy of a google search result

  • Find two articles on a news topic from different publications. Or find a news article and an opinion piece on the same topic. Make a Venn diagram comparing the similarities and differences.
  • Choose a graph, map, or chart from The New York Times’ What’s Going On In This Graph series . Have a whole class or small group discussion about the data.
  • Look at images stripped of their captions on What’s Going On In This Picture? by The New York Times. Discuss the images in pairs or small groups. What can you tell?
  • Explore a website together as a class or in pairs — perhaps a news website. Identify all the advertisements .
  • Have a look at a fake website either as a whole class or in pairs/small groups. See if students can spot that these sites are not real. Discuss the fact that you can’t believe everything that’s online. Get started with these four examples of fake websites from Eric Curts.
  • Give students a copy of my website evaluation flowchart to analyse and then discuss as a class. Read more about the flowchart in this post.
  • As a class, look at a prompt from Mike Caulfield’s Four Moves . Either together or in small groups, have students fact check the prompts on the site. This resource explains more about the fact checking process. Note: some of these prompts are not suitable for younger students.
  • Practice skim reading — give students one minute to read a short article. Ask them to discuss what stood out to them. Headings? Bold words? Quotes? Then give students ten minutes to read the same article and discuss deep reading.

research project ideas year 12

All students can benefit from learning about plagiarism, copyright, how to write information in their own words, and how to acknowledge the source. However, the formality of this process will depend on your students’ age and your curriculum guidelines.

  • Watch the video Citation for Beginners for an introduction to citation. Discuss the key points to remember.
  • Look up the definition of plagiarism using a variety of sources (dictionary, video, Wikipedia etc.). Create a definition as a class.
  • Find an interesting video on YouTube (perhaps a “life hack” video) and write a brief summary in your own words.
  • Have students pair up and tell each other about their weekend. Then have the listener try to verbalise or write their friend’s recount in their own words. Discuss how accurate this was.
  • Read the class a copy of a well known fairy tale. Have them write a short summary in their own words. Compare the versions that different students come up with.
  • Try out MyBib — a handy free online tool without ads that helps you create citations quickly and easily.
  • Give primary/elementary students a copy of Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Citation that matches their grade level (the guide covers grades 1 to 6). Choose one form of citation and create some examples as a class (e.g. a website or a book).
  • Make a list of things that are okay and not okay to do when researching, e.g. copy text from a website, use any image from Google images, paraphrase in your own words and cite your source, add a short quote and cite the source. 
  • Have students read a short article and then come up with a summary that would be considered plagiarism and one that would not be considered plagiarism. These could be shared with the class and the students asked to decide which one shows an example of plagiarism .
  • Older students could investigate the difference between paraphrasing and summarising . They could create a Venn diagram that compares the two.
  • Write a list of statements on the board that might be true or false ( e.g. The 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia. The rhinoceros is the largest land animal in the world. The current marathon world record is 2 hours, 7 minutes). Have students research these statements and decide whether they’re true or false by sharing their citations.

Staying Organised

research project ideas year 12

  • Make a list of different ways you can take notes while researching — Google Docs, Google Keep, pen and paper etc. Discuss the pros and cons of each method.
  • Learn the keyboard shortcuts to help manage tabs (e.g. open new tab, reopen closed tab, go to next tab etc.). Perhaps students could all try out the shortcuts and share their favourite one with the class.
  • Find a collection of resources on a topic and add them to a Wakelet .
  • Listen to a short podcast or watch a brief video on a certain topic and sketchnote ideas. Sylvia Duckworth has some great tips about live sketchnoting
  • Learn how to use split screen to have one window open with your research, and another open with your notes (e.g. a Google spreadsheet, Google Doc, Microsoft Word or OneNote etc.) .

All teachers know it’s important to teach students to research well. Investing time in this process will also pay off throughout the year and the years to come. Students will be able to focus on analysing and synthesizing information, rather than the mechanics of the research process.

By trying out as many of these mini-lessons as possible throughout the year, you’ll be really helping your students to thrive in all areas of school, work, and life.

Also remember to model your own searches explicitly during class time. Talk out loud as you look things up and ask students for input. Learning together is the way to go!

You Might Also Enjoy Reading:

How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students

Five Tips for Teaching Students How to Research and Filter Information

Typing Tips: The How and Why of Teaching Students Keyboarding Skills

8 Ways Teachers And Schools Can Communicate With Parents

Learn how to teach research skills to primary students, middle school students, or high school students. 50 activities that could be done in just a few minutes a day. Lots of Google search tips and research tips for kids and teachers. Free PDF included! Kathleen Morris | Primary Tech

10 Replies to “50 Mini-Lessons For Teaching Students Research Skills”

Loving these ideas, thank you

This list is amazing. Thank you so much!

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So glad it’s helpful, Alex! 🙂

Hi I am a student who really needed some help on how to reasearch thanks for the help.

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So glad it helped! 🙂

seriously seriously grateful for your post. 🙂

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So glad it’s helpful! Makes my day 🙂

How do you get the 50 mini lessons. I got the free one but am interested in the full version.

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Hi Tracey, The link to the PDF with the 50 mini lessons is in the post. Here it is . Check out this post if you need more advice on teaching students how to research online. Hope that helps! Kathleen

Best wishes to you as you face your health battler. Hoping you’ve come out stronger and healthier from it. Your website is so helpful.

Comments are closed.

Samford Valley Steiner School

Samford Valley Steiner School

Year 12 Senior Research Projects

Project presentations – friday 20 october & saturday 21 october 2023.

Introducing the 2023 Year 12 students and their Senior Research Projects. The presentations will be on Friday 21 October and Saturday 22 October. All are welcome to attend. Program details below.

research project ideas year 12

Mehdi Shajirati

Mehdi is a creative and sensitive soul with the charisma of an artist. He inspires and encourages teamwork with his peers and younger students and believes in the power of the arts to change the world.

My Senior Research Project is looking at directing and how a director can impact a play. To do that I decided to co-direct my own play, which became The Odyssey . Since I began at the school, I got heavily into acting, theatre and filming, but I didn’t like the lack of creative control that the actor has, so I thought that exploring directing may help me understand more of what a director does and how this shapes the performance.

Throughout my SRP, I’ve researched how a director acts and responds to situations and the different types of directing. I have also gained firsthand experience with working with a crew and taking actors through scenes, and I’ve directed some fight choreography, which was awesome. I’ve learnt there are a lot of elements that a director needs to have to get their message across successfully; they need to be able to transfer the image they have in their heads into words that help the actors understand their vision and that has been the part that is most challenging for me, but is also the part that is critical to the skill-set a director needs to have.

There have been obstacles that I encountered – the first directing experience I had was challenging as I learnt to become comfortable in that role, but it’s gotten easier as time has gone on. I don’t think I’ll move forward with directing in the future, but I hope to move into the arts and acting.

I think that being a Steiner student means being creative – however that looks for you – whether its inventing, art, physical theatre… it’s learning to be yourself and be the best part of yourself. It has shaped me for the better, I can’t imagine myself being in any other school, being here has created a passion within me for acting and theatre.

My favourite Main Lesson was the Astronomy Main Lesson in Class 12. It was taught by Fiona, I really enjoyed the way she conducts the lesson and puts it together.

My favourite camp is hard to choose, it would be between the Great Keppel camp in Class 7 and the Class 10 Surveying Camp. I remember jumping across the sand dunes on Great Keppel and it being so much fun. I enjoy watching everyone come together and help each other during camps, it seems like even when there might be people that don’t get along in the classroom, they put aside their differences during camps to help each other and work together.

I would say my experience at SVSS has been mind-opening. We don’t choose our electives until Class 11 and so you try everything and get to find out what you like and don’t like. I think this helps to expand you. School is always challenging and while it doesn’t get easier, it is worth it in the end. Moving forward, I would say that I hope to use the arts and acting to entertain the world.

research project ideas year 12

samuel ryan

  A student at SVSS since kindergarten, Samuel is a bright and clever student who enjoys the hands-on aspects of his studies. Samuel blends his wicked sense of humour with the seriousness of science. He has a passion for the outdoors and the spirit of an inventor. 

My Senior Research Project is about designing and creating a new chemical renewable energy source. This was a topic of interest to me because I have always enjoyed making things and I remember when I was about 14, my dad and uncle were talking about hydro dams and that was when I first got the idea of inventing something to generate energy. I started off with getting down a basic design and figuring out what I need to convert two way linear motion to one way rotary motion and trying to find the most efficient method of doing that. I investigated ones that were already out there but discovered that they had a lot of friction, so I designed my own and I think I am going to go with that.

I’ve gone a lot into the chemical side and understanding how it works and the reactions these can have as well as the energy that it can generate. I design quite a few things, so the designing aspect wasn’t too difficult, but finding someone to build it with me has been a challenge. I’m sure everyone says this, but I wish I had started sooner and delved deeper into finding someone who could help me earlier with the building. Time management is key! I’m interested in moving forward with science in the future but I’m looking more towards bio and genetic engineering.

For me, being a Steiner student means you are more in nature and more hands on; the camps always come up as something that sets us apart. I’ve been here since pre-school, so Steiner schooling is something that has always been a part of my experience. I think that this has helped me be more creative and interested in building and inventing things. It’s also inspired me to want to get out in nature, I love being outdoors! Next year, I’m taking a gap year to travel to South America and Taiwan to see more of the world.

My favourite Main Lesson was in Class 6, with Alan teaching us Greek Mythology. I love the Science Main Lessons in High School, but I do have fond memories of Alan telling us the myths. We get brought up with mythologies from all parts of the world from Class 1 and I really enjoyed listening to all of Alan’s storytelling, but the ancient mythologies were very cool.

My favourite camp was Great Keppel, it was great to spend time on the island. And it’s always nice when there is a water source, so we don’t have to carry our water! I enjoy the challenge of pushing myself during camps to see where my limits lie and in the character building of class mates during these challenges. I enjoy all the physical aspects of climbing mountains and long hikes. I also remember running down the sand dune on low tech camp, I think it’s second largest sand dune in the world.

I would say that my experience has been full of adventure and nature and looking into how the world works. If I could give some advice to younger students it would be that you get so much more out of a subject if you dive into it. In the future, I would like to be able to create a business that works on sharing energy with the world.

research project ideas year 12

Joshua Mahoney

  Josh has been a vibrant and caring addition to his cohort since his arrival in Class 10. Artistic and with a quick, dry humour, he has become a leader amongst the younger students and is always ready to put up his hand and take on new challenges. Josh sees things with a perceptive eye and articulates his point of view with a maturity well beyond his years.

The topic of my SRP surrounds the Outdoor Classroom and I’ve been working on this in connection with the Odyssey. The Outdoor Classroom is a learning space that is outdoors, right next to the trees, and it doesn’t have doors or conventional walls. I have been building a roundhouse, which will be a space that can be used during camps or for students to come and learn in the Outdoor Classroom setting.

Initially I thought about doing art for my project, but after speaking to Andy, we were talking about a project that could impact the school more and when I settled on Outdoor Classroom, Andy said, “Great! Here is all the ‘stuff’!” and I had a great head start on where to begin. The advantage of the Outdoor Classroom on the students is its proximity to nature. There are plenty of studies that show that spending time in nature is beneficial, it helps produce the happy chemicals in your brain and if you can do that in a way that incorporates learning then it’s great! It helps incorporate play into learning as well.

There have been plenty of challenges along the way. With an Outdoor Classroom, you are limited by the weather, it can get really hot in summer and obviously it’s not great in the rain. Building an Outdoor Classroom is labour-intensive, and due to the Friday Verticals as a part of The Odyssey, my main ‘workforce’ has been Class 8 students…which presents its own challenges! You must learn how to communicate with people what you want and how you want something to look; I’ve definitely learnt management skills and how to deal with personality clashes. I don’t think I’m going to pursue a career in teaching after this! Other skills I’ve learnt along the way has been the woodworking skills. I’ve learnt how to use the tools and work with the materials and I’m confident now that I can build what I want to.

I came to SVSS in Class 10 from a Mainstream school. In my life I’ve travelled around a lot, moving from Australia to England to Mongolia and back to Australia. I’ve attended school in a lot of different settings, and I think the biggest difference between other schools and Steiner is the community. In other schools they separate classes very intensely. At SVSS you have friends in lots of different classes and this integration is encouraged. I haven’t seen that in other schools that I’ve attended.

I really enjoyed the Parzival Main Lesson with Mel. Currently we are doing Chemistry of Life with Fiona and I’m really enjoying that; I think it’s mainly because Fiona is such a great teacher. My favourite learning experience though has been the sculpting with Samuela. We went out to the Phoenix Sculpture Gardens and that was such an amazing experience. I really enjoyed spending time inside and outside of school, working on my sculpture. It’s something I really love about being here, that you can take time after school to create.

My favourite skill I’ve learnt here has been forging. I had never had the chance to learn metalwork before but here, everyone gets to learn metalwork, everyone gets to learn forging. You get to experiment, and that is what Andy encourages – you experiment with materials, with how you hit it, what you do with it. That type of experimentation and freedom has allowed me to develop my forging skills very quickly and I’m quite happy with what I’m able to do now.

My favourite memories are Class 10 Production, Class 11 Botany, and the VET camps, but a standout was Sailing camp with Dave and Kali. I get seasick a bit, so I didn’t go for extra sailing, but it was great to wake up by the water and sitting by the campfire and making dinner and talking to everyone…I love that so much.

After school, I’m thinking of going into politics in the Greens Party to see if I can use my words to impact and improve the world we live in, even if it’s just one town. Either that…or paint. Maybe I’ll try to change the world through my art.

For me, if I was to sum up my experience at SVSS, I would say it has been one of free, creative, exploration.

research project ideas year 12

Thor Morrison

  Thor has integrated himself effortlessly into his class after his arrival in Class 12. With both an analytical and creative mind, Thor has excelled as a student. He is confident, with an upbeat vibe that is contagious. Thor has a musical soul and a passion for performing arts.

For my SRP I have been exploring musical composition. Over the course of the year, I have composed four different pieces of music and arranged one, for a variety of instruments but primarily strings. Two string quartet pieces with a soloist as well, so technically a quintet, violin and cello duet, a vocal duet and vocal trio. My SRP was focused on composition of music but also on the performance of music.

As a composer and also as a musician, it’s important to me that music is actually performed and not just written. As part of my process, I ran auditions for musicians and then we ran rehearsals and then had a performance.

The theme of the music was on solitude or loneliness. One of the ways I explored portraying that was via uneven number of parts, so there was always an outsider. I also did this through keys – such as minor keys to bring a sadness element to it. Each piece reflects a different aspect of loneliness or solitude and the emotions that can come through that. There are pieces that are sad and pieces that are happy – because people can be either of these emotions when being alone.

I chose solitude because it’s something that I relate to. I am one of those people who enjoys solitude, but I’ve also experienced the negative emotions that can occur with this also. As a child I grew up in the Northern Territory and my parents are rangers, so at times we would be on stations for months on end and it would be just our family, which I think has helped me be comfortable with being alone. It’s not a foreign concept to me. I find it interesting to see how different people react to sitting with their own company. Following on from that, I think after covid, there has been a big shift in the nature of loneliness, loneliness increased during covid lockdowns, but it was found that after they ended the levels remain increased as people struggle to find that connection afterwards.

After school I hope to continue writing music by doing a Bachelor of Composition.

I have been at SVSS since the beginning of the year. Prior to that I was in a Steiner school in Cairns. There wasn’t a big transition for me as they also did the CSE, so I felt like I could just jump straight in.

My favourite Main Lesson was Modern Literature. I really enjoy reading and I believe that stories are very important. I enjoyed doing the deep dive into sub-genres and the effects that the two World Wars had on literature at the time and where we are now and where we might go in the future.

I haven’t been on a camp since I became an SVSS student, but I’ve been on two camps with SVSS – the first was in Class 10, when the Cairns Hinterland Steiner School joined SVSS on their Surveying camp and we came down here and we got to do the map making together. Last year I also came down and did the K’gari camp with the Class 11s. I really enjoyed the hiking on K’gari even though it did rain a lot! It’s awful setting up tents in the rain. But we had a lot of fun. I remember this one part where it had been raining for a while and we stopped for a rest, there was this break in the rain, we sat down in the middle of this rainforest, eating lunch with these big trees and it was really beautiful.

I really enjoy the metalwork and blacksmithing. I had never done anything like that before. We did an excursion to a blacksmithing festival a couple of weeks ago which was very cool. It’s fun to learn this kind of obscure skill.

I think being a Steiner student means exploring different realms of what you can do. You aren’t constricted to a singular topic or a singular stream of learning. You have the opportunity to combine different aspects of learning within a project.

I have enjoyed being a part of SVSS.

research project ideas year 12

Mia Altschwager

Mia is an incredibly dedicated student who manages to balance the fullness of life with her studies. She meets every challenge with a can-do attitude and infectious enthusiasm. Mia has the rare ability to understand the value of connection and be able to express this both in her school work and photography.

I decided to do my Senior Research on how to best capture a moment through photography. I have had to learn how to take the photos and how to edit them as well as the best places to print your work. I also presented a gallery of my work to the public. Photography has always been something I have been interested in since I was young. When I was little, I would take my mum’s phone and take photos of everyone. A couple of years ago, my sister got a camera for her SRP and I decided to use this and learn to use the camera properly.

I have learnt about the different colour profiles at different printers and how to make your work more ‘true to colour’ when printing. It was very surreal seeing my work printed. It was a massive job to pick out the ones I wanted to show and then put them up – there seemed to be a lot more than I thought! My favourite thing to capture was the little moments of connection between people that I know, especially those people in my class.

I will definitely keep doing photography as a hobby, but I don’t think I will do it as a career.

I’ve been at SVSS since the end of Class 9, and I had my first camp three weeks after I started at school. It was one of the most intense camps as it was the minimalist camp, you even made your own bag to bring with you! It was a beautiful location, the waters were amazing and we swam every day.

My favourite camp was the Sailing Camp. I really enjoyed being on the boat – especially when I didn’t have to do anything and could just sit back and enjoy the scenery. I had never sailed before so I had to learn how to sail. There was also a lot of leadership in that camp as we all took turns being captain. It was a good one to bond over because you had to troubleshoot a lot while on the water. It was freezing cold though!

I have really enjoyed learning the skills we picked up in Hardcraft. At my old school we didn’t have this offered. We get to just jump in and everyone is like, “It’s okay! We will just teach you how to do it.” We  have also had to learn a lot of time management this year as we have big jewellery projects going where we have come up with our own designs  and journal about that, then learn to make the jewellery and then also take the extra time to shine them up.

Comparative Religion was a favourite topic. We took that with Delaney and I really enjoyed how it was an immersive experience that included excursions to the churches and temples so we could understand how things worked and talk to people in that religion.

Favourite memories for me would be the sports day where Ebony organised a volleyball competition and the Class 10 Production and hanging out with my class afterwards, skateboarding.

After school, I’m not sure I want to necessarily impact the world, but just make it better in some way even if it’s just for one person or the people that are close to me. If I’m helping to make things better for even one person then that’s good enough for me.

research project ideas year 12

Isabelle Muller

Isabelle displays a maturity and courageous nature beyond her years. She is creative and positive with a caring and empathetic heart. Isabelle has always been happy to jump in with both feet when it came to organising, rolling up her sleeves and getting things done. With her balance of creativity and heart-led kindness, Isabelle has blended this in her film about social anxiety.  

For my SRP I have chosen exploring and understanding social anxiety in a short film. I had never made a film before so I needed to research how to make a film first and all the different steps. I was involved in every aspect of it, writing it, filming it, directing it, as well as also acting a big role in the film. I also researched into social anxiety. While exploring that I found that my thoughts were right. I think most people know what social anxiety is, but I was hoping to give a different perspective. The feedback was positive on that front, many people told me that afterwards they understood why someone they knew may have acted in a certain way or they understood their own experiences in a new light. It provoked quite an emotional reaction for some people, who let me know it made them cry. It warmed my heart to know that I had helped people in that way.  

I’ve always loved acting. When I was a little kid, I would make up plays with my siblings and friends. In Primary School I always enjoyed the plays and acting in roles. Moving into High School, I wanted to expand this from theatre into film. I do have a little bit of social anxiety, not diagnosed but I can get very shy and overthink about things I may have said. So when I went to create a film, I didn’t want it to just be a random story. I wanted it to mean something.   

I feel like this experience has made me think more about moving more towards film making in my future. I still love acting, but I’m definitely thinking more about film making now.   

I have been here at SVSS since pre-school, although I did go to the State School for a little while before quickly coming back in year one. Our Primary School class teacher always made our lessons fun, one time we had a different teacher come in and say he was running late in traffic and then he burst out of the cupboard, all in costume, pretending to be this completely different person. He was always doing little interactive things like that which made it enjoyable.  

My favourite Main Lessons were the Drama ones, where you work just on a play for 3 weeks and it’s intense but I love it.   

I have really fond memories of all the camps, whenever you are on them you always form closer connections to all your classmates. I couldn’t choose a favourite one, but I love the beach, so it would have to be any beach camp. We went walking across Fraser, it was hiking, swimming, beach and forest all together. There is a lake that has absolute crystal clear water, and on the second last day we had gotten there early so spent the rest of the day swimming, and then the next morning, myself and the other girls got up early for another swim at sunrise.   

I think being at SVSS gives you life skills you wouldn’t get elsewhere, going on camps out in the outdoors, having a connection with your teachers where they do feel more like friends. I think it’s helped me become the type of person that I am.   

I feel like there is always something happening here, it feels like a big community or family. It sounds kind of odd, but it’s a bit of a spiritual journey, the connections your form and the road that you go on as a person. 

research project ideas year 12

MAYA PLAETZER

Maya has been with the school since Class 3 and has a creative flair that extends to many artistic mediums. She is a blend of both clever and casual, and unapologetically herself. She is driven and ambitious, while still exploring the joys of life.

My SRP is a bit of everything! The theme ended up being, ‘Is Handmade Better?’ but it has evolved quite a lot from where it began. I started with crochet and creating a summer collection, which expanded into a summer and winter collection…then a whole wardrobe, and then I began exploring ceramics also. I found I was spending more time doing the ceramics and eventually I decided to just include all my art that I have made this year. I’ve always been interested in Handmade items, but I think it really blossomed in Class 10 when I learnt to crochet and really got into sewing and went to TAFE to study fashion technology. I love when someone asks, “Where did you get that?” and you can say that you made it, it’s so rewarding!

During my research I was looking at comparisons between mass produced and handmade items. I personally prefer handmade, it’s not always practical, it’s easier to just go and buy something pre-made, but I find that when you make something yourself or receive something that someone has made for you, the item is full of character and sentimentality that I don’t think exists within mass produced items. I also looked into sustainability, obviously it’s much harder to sustainably create mass produced items. This has always been important to me, and I’ve always sought out second hand items, or would rather support a local maker or seller over chain stores. I still occasionally purchase something mass produced, I’m not perfect! But I’m trying to make consciously better choices.

My biggest challenge was sticking to one thing. I find that I tend to become very expansive when I’m interested in something. I start with one thing and move to another… and another. Mel has been really great with keeping me on track and helping me find how to integrate the things I wanted to do with what I needed to do for the task. I was surprised by the SRP, because I worried it would feel boring, but it’s been fun and it’s amazing to look at the progress you have made over the course of the year. It had me excited to write my thesis.

I have been here since I was in Class 3, so I don’t have a lot of other schooling experiences to compare to, but I think SVSS is very hands on, even when you’re doing academic work, they add in elements that are very hands on. I don’t think I would be who I am without the school, I don’t think I would have realised how creative I am. The whole reason that I am the way I am is because of Steiner.

To begin with, I wasn’t really into camps, but I started really liking them last year which is a bit of a shame! I think they do bring you closer to your classmates; you see that bonding happening so quickly. I also really appreciated not having technology with me all the time also. My favourite camp was Sailing Camp. It was definitely the coldest camp, but it was also the most fun and I remember snoozing on the boat with Hannah. I think at that time school was getting so busy and hectic and it was this beautiful break getting to go do something slow like sailing.

One of my favourite memories at SVSS, was skating at break up in the top of the carpark. My favourite Main Lesson was Samuela’s Modern Art. I appreciated the structure of it, there was this nice balance between theory and practical, and of course it is a topic that I really enjoy.

I think the thing that sets Steiner schooling apart is the community. Even when you leave, or they leave, you still seem to find a way back to each other, you’re always in each other’s lives. There is also more equality and respect between students and teachers, it feels more collaborative, instead of having a teacher just ‘talking at you’. It feels like a conversation.

If I was summing up my experience, I would say that it allows you to explore how to be yourself and express how you want to be seen in the world.

research project ideas year 12

Sehong Fitzgerald

Sehong has been at SVSS from the beginning of High School and brings her cheerful and positive nature to her classmates and teachers. She has quiet leadership and is a deep thinker who brings nuance and maturity to conversations.

My SRP project was about how to make a sustainable or eco-friendly gazebo. When I was in eighth grade, I undertook a handcrafted project that involved creating jewellery. This year, I endeavoured to challenge myself by acquiring new skills by building a gazebo.

There have been challenges along the way, especially the more physical elements and the mathematical side of things. I started the building project later in the term, I had to delve into the research side of things first to find out what is suitable, what is eco-friendly, and avoiding chemical-based materials. I’m building this in my parent’s backyard, and I’m really excited for it to be finished.

I began attending SVSS in Class 8. I don’t usually like transitions but being here has been great. Everyone made me feel comfortable and I was able to settle in at my own speed. In mainstream school you don’t have as much of a relationship with the teachers, but here you get to have proper conversations…and that’s what the real world is like. I appreciate how close you feel to nature here and it gives you this feeling of freedom. Everyone has a different way of learning and I feel like we are all taught as individuals.

My favourite camp was Sailing Camp. It was really relaxing but I also got to overcome a fear of mine. I was afraid of deep ocean and bodies of water, but I overcame it and enjoyed the entire camp. I got to know more about my classmates. I feel like at any of the camps my favourite thing was getting to know people better and connecting.

My time here at SVSS has been one that I’ve enjoyed. Sometimes thing can get a bit hectic, but it’s been fun.

research project ideas year 12

Roan Spargo

Roan shows a quiet dedication to getting things done with a ‘can do’ attitude that has helped him excel in his areas of passion. With an upbeat attitude, a solid sense of humour and his confidence, Roan has been an asset to his class and our school.

I have chosen to restore old tools for my SRP. I use a lot of hand tools and I enjoy making sure they’re working correctly. I like old tools and history, I think the older tools tend to be better quality in workmanship and quality of the steel. Modern tools tend to be thrown away when they get blunt and aren’t made to last. As I had some prior knowledge in this area, I didn’t need to do a lot of research for my project.

Moving forward I am hoping to continue doing this as a hobby or small business. Next year I’m hoping to go into building construction. My challenges have been keeping up to date with sticking to a plan. Sometimes when I’m fixing something, it can be a bit trickier that I expected, but I don’t really think of it as a challenge, I just work around it.

I’ve been a Steiner student my whole schooling life and at SVSS since Class 3 so I’ve never really known anything different, but I do think we are pretty lucky with the way we get taught and what we get to experience. I think it helps sculpt a good human being.

As for favourite camps, well I’m not done with them yet! Lady Musgrave sounds pretty good. I really enjoyed the VET Vertical Camp as I love climbing and it was lots of fun. It’s hard to say a camp that I’ve liked the most as they’re all different and there are good parts and more difficult parts. The class definitely bonds more when you are on camps.

A favourite subject has been Hardcraft, I enjoy working with my hands. Boat building would have been standout. It was a lot of fun.

My time at SVSS was the way our class is almost like a family as you are with each other for years and in Primary School you have the same teacher. It brings another level of bonding to your experience.

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60 Senior Project Ideas for High School Students – 2024

May 13, 2024

Many high school students look forward to the exciting moment of choosing a senior project. This makes sense since senior projects provide opportunities for students to direct what they’ve learned into something they care about, and to take their academic interests beyond the classroom. At the same time, deciding what to pursue can be nerve-wracking. After all the anticipation, when it finally comes time to decide on a project, students might ask themselves, now what ? If you find yourself in this dilemma, or if you could just use some further inspiration, continue reading for a list of 60 senior project ideas for high school students. Once you find a senior project idea that catches your eye, you can always put your own spin on it, or use it to inspire projects on topics outside this list.

What is a senior project?

Put simply, a senior project is a semester-long project you take on in your final year of high school. So, what counts as a senior project? This can vary widely. While different schools have different requirements (for example, some high schools expect students to focus specifically on internship experiences), the assignments tend to be pretty flexible. In the senior project ideas listed below, you will find suggestions ranging from assisting a science researcher, to interning at a local museum, to organizing an academic tutoring program, to helping with community voter registration. The final outputs for senior projects may also vary in form, from guidebooks, to plays, to research papers, and apps.

Considerations when choosing a senior project

Because a senior project is often seen as the culmination of your high school experience, you should choose a topic that reflects your passions and interests. At the same time, it’s an opportunity to develop new skills and challenge yourself as you prepare for your next steps after graduation. Whether you have plans to begin a 4-year university program, enroll in a 2-year degree program , take a gap year , or start a new job, a senior project can prepare you with experience that you wouldn’t receive in your high school classes in an ordinary semester.

Here are a few questions you can ask yourself when thinking of a senior project idea:

  • What field or career do you wish to pursue? If you’re not sure, what are 2-3 fields that you could possibly see yourself pursuing at this point in your life?
  • What world issues do you care most about? Climate change? LGBTQIA+ rights? Accessible healthcare? If thinking about a particular issue sparks a passion, this could be a great place to start.
  • Based on your high school coursework experience, could you see yourself spending extra time on an artistic project? A science-based one? A research paper with a political theme?
  • What do you enjoy doing in your free time? Volunteering with kids? Hiking and camping? Dancing? Cooking? Perhaps you can orient your senior project to something that you already know brings you joy.

60 senior project ideas

Below you can find 60 high school senior project ideas, divided into some general categories that might help you focus your search. As you read through, feel free to stick to these exact ideas or use them to inspire other ones.

Business – Senior Project Idea

  • Write a printed or virtual guidebook to small local businesses in your area, including descriptions, photographs phone numbers and social media accounts.
  • Help a local business with an advertising campaign, through local news outlets and social media.
  • Develop a mentorship program to help those who are searching for jobs with resumes, interviews, and cover letters.
  • Intern at a start-up based in your area.
  • Write a research paper about models for sustainable businesses.
  • Organize an after-school program that helps students learn financial literacy.

Community service

  • Organize a ride service to bring elderly community members to and from doctor’s appointments, or to provide them with groceries and other needs.
  • Volunteer at a local soup kitchen.
  • Organize a food drive at your school.
  • Create a social media campaign for a local animal shelter to raise awareness.
  • Collaborate with a local charity or non-profit with a mission you believe in to organize a fundraiser.
  • Collect school supplies and art supplies for families in need.

Creative writing – Senior Project Ideas

  • Write and illustrate a children’s book.
  • Create a handmade poetry book.
  • Intern at a small local publisher or magazine.
  • Work to translate a short story or poem to another language.
  • Write a screenplay for a short film.
  • Start a school literary magazine that accepts student submissions of poems, essays, and short stories. Organize a team so that the magazine can continue after you graduate.
  • Organize a peer tutoring program at your school for students who need extra help with writing, languages, or math.
  • Construct a free library box in your neighborhood so that more people have access to books.
  • Volunteer at a local elementary school to help children with their homework after school.
  • Work with a local senior center to teach a foreign language to residents.
  • Develop a website or app for students to match with language partners for practicing conversation skills.
  • Start a visual or performing arts class for children in your community.

Environmentalism- Senior Project Ideas

  • Design and build a sustainable garden.
  • Organize a community clean-up day, or a series of community clean-up days, at a local park or waterfront.
  • Organize an Earth Day festival at your school. This could involve live music and performance, environmental art displays, local vegetarian food, and sustainable clothing swaps.
  • Write a research paper on one thing that contributes to climate change, as well as potential solutions.
  • Write a guidebook to local parks and hiking trails so that locals and visitors alike can appreciate these outdoor spots.
  • Create a fashion line with all reused materials.
  • Research historic sites in your neighborhood or town, and write a printed or online guidebook to these points of local history.
  • Record a podcast on the history of one of your hobbies (fashion? sports?) Contact an expert on this history to ask if you can interview them on the podcast.
  • Write a research paper on the history of a particular protest movement.
  • Write and direct a short play with a contemporary take on a historical event that interests you.
  • Create a documentary film on the history of your community (school, town, etc.), and organize a community screening.
  • Intern at a local history museum.

Performing Arts – Senior Project Ideas

  • Write and record an original song.
  • Write, direct, and show a one-act play.
  • Organize a community dance performance with student choreographers and performers, featuring a range of different styles.
  • Volunteer to help with accessibility needs (theater access, live captioning, etc.) at a local theater.
  • Organize a school comedy night or talent show that benefits a charity of your choice.
  • Research the history of a film genre, and direct a short film that reflects this genre.
  • Intern for a local political newspaper or magazine.
  • Volunteer on the campaign of a local candidate.
  • Create an online blog to write on a political issue you care about, or write a series of op-eds for a local newspaper.
  • Write a research paper on a local problem (housing prices, green space, voting access) that discusses possible solutions to this problem.
  • Create a Model UN or Mock Trial team at your school if one doesn’t already exist.
  • Help teens and other community members register to vote.

Science and medicine – Senior Project Ideas

  • Build a Rube Goldberg machine .
  • Work in the lab of a STEM professor at a nearby university who works on a topic you’re interested in.
  • Research a community health problem (drug safety, air/water quality, nutritional food access) and develop solutions with the help of local politicians and/or medical experts. Create a research paper, blog, or documentary film on your findings.
  • Assist at a doctor’s office or hospital by helping to translate for patients who are non-native English speakers.
  • Design an architectural structure (for example, a house or bridge) and build a 3D model.
  • Organize a technology support group at your school to make technology more accessible and help with easy tech repairs.

Visual arts

  • Design a mural for your school to highlight an aspect of the school culture or commemorate an important moment in its history.
  • Intern at a local art museum and learn how to give a tour of its current exhibits.
  • Organize the collaborative building of a sculpture at your school made of all reused or found objects.
  • Offer to take wedding or senior photographs for those who might not be able to afford a professional photographer.
  • Study a famous painter, and then create a series of paintings (or art of another medium) based on, or in response to, their works.
  • Create a school-wide photography exhibition, with a theme of your choosing.

Senior Project Ideas – Final thoughts

We hope that this list has sparked inspiration for your high school senior project. Remember that while senior projects are important (and hopefully fun) opportunities to culminate your high school experience, you don’t need to do it all in one project! If you’re inspired by more than one of these project ideas, hold onto them for years to come or pursue them as summer internships .

If you’re interested in more project ideas for high school students, we recommend the following articles:

  • 100 Examples of Community Service Projects
  • 98 Passion Project Ideas
  • 100 Best Clubs to Start in High School
  • Persuasive Speech Topics
  • High School Success

Sarah Mininsohn

With a BA from Wesleyan University and an MFA from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Sarah is a writer, educator, and artist. She served as a graduate instructor at the University of Illinois, a tutor at St Peter’s School in Philadelphia, and an academic writing tutor and thesis mentor at Wesleyan’s Writing Workshop.

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New $90 Million Project to Create Digital Research Hub Focused on K-12 Education

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EdWeek Market Brief, NSF Backs $90M to Bring Together Universities to Find Solutions in K-12 Education

The National Science Foundation has awarded Rice University $90 million to build what is being described as a first-of-its-kind education research hub that will leverage data from an array  of major digital learning platforms currently serving tens of millions of students. 

The university recently announced the investment as its largest ever federal research grant. OpenStax at Rice, a major publisher of open education resources, will build the research and development hub known as SafeInsights .

The project will focus on producing “research-informed insights about teaching and learning for educators, institutions and learning platforms to use to create tailored programs, pedagogies and policies that will equip learners to thrive.”

“Just like there are bigger telescopes that let astronomers see deeper into the night, SafeInsights’ goal is to have this large student population that will enable researchers to see deeper into the student learning experience,” Slavinsky said in an interview. 

The SafeInsights hub will take five years to build, he said, with early research projects b eginning in 16 to 18 months, and full-scale research operations starting in 2029. 

School districts’ commitment to seeking and using research-based educational strategies is uneven at best. Many district officials complain that academic and other scientifically based research is too abstract, disconnected from their work, and outdated to be of practical use in their decision-making.

When surveyed recently by EdWeek Market Brief on what sorts of research they value most when choosing products and services, district and school leaders were much more likely to point to data on student outcomes, or product usage data than they were rigorous, experimental research.

Data Security in Focus 

At $90 million, the award is NSF’s largest investment in research and development infrastructure for education at a national scale, the university said.

In the past, education research has been hampered by small study groups and short time frames, but the recent boom in digital learning can provide researchers with a plethora of data needed to better understand academic outcomes, Slavinsky said. 

SafeInsights’ goal is to have this large student population that will enable researchers to see deeper into the student learning experience. J.P. Slavinsky, Executive Director, SafeInsights

And research will not be limited to only STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) areas. Schools, education companies, and researchers participating in SafeInsights will bring their own research agenda, Slavinsky said.

Protecting student data is a major concern within school districts, particularly as  schools’ and students’ reliance on technology  has steadily grown.

The data collected as part of the new project will remain secure, Slavinsky said. No student information will be revealed to researchers. 

Instead, researchers will submit their inquiries to SafeInsights, and the research hub will have the data in question analyzed where it is originally stored — by schools or on a digital platform — and provide researchers with aggregate results. 

The research and development project will be a central hub for 80 partners and collaborating institutions. That number is expected to grow, Slavinsky said. 

“One of the great things about SafeInsights is that it is very scalable,” he said. “And we want to build this community, so we can get a better and better picture of the students and the teachers we’re trying to help.” 

Follow  EdWeek Market Brief  on Twitter  @EdMarketBrief  or connect with us on  LinkedIn .

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  • Americans’ Changing Relationship With Local News

As news consumption habits become more digital, U.S. adults continue to see value in local outlets

Table of contents.

  • 1. Attention to local news
  • 2. Local news topics
  • Americans’ changing local news providers
  • How people feel about their local news media’s performance
  • Most Americans think local journalists are in touch with their communities
  • Interactions with local journalists
  • 5. Americans’ views on the financial health of local news
  • Acknowledgments
  • The American Trends Panel survey methodology

Reporters question a defense attorney at Harris County Criminal Courts at Law in Houston on March 26, 2024. (Yi-Chin Lee/Houston Chronicle via Getty Images)

The Pew-Knight Initiative supports new research on how Americans absorb civic information, form beliefs and identities, and engage in their communities.

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world. Knight Foundation is a social investor committed to supporting informed and engaged communities. Learn more >

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand the local news habits and attitudes of U.S. adults. It is a follow-up to a similar study conducted in 2018 .

The survey of 5,146 U.S. adults was conducted from Jan. 22 to 28, 2024. Everyone who completed the survey is a member of the Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories.  Read more about the ATP’s methodology .

Refer to the topline for the questions used for this survey , along with responses, and to the methodology for more details.

This is a Pew Research Center report from the Pew-Knight Initiative, a research program funded jointly by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Find related reports online at https://www.pewresearch.org/pew-knight/ .

The local news landscape in America is going through profound changes as both news consumers and producers continue to adapt to a more digital news environment. We recently asked U.S. adults about the ways they access local news, as well as their attitudes toward local journalism, finding that:

A bar chart showing Americans increasingly prefer digital pathways to local news

  • A growing share of Americans prefer to get local news online, while fewer are getting news on TV or in print. And newspapers are no longer primarily consumed as a print product – the majority of readers of local daily newspapers now access them digitally.
  • The share of U.S. adults who say they are paying close attention to local news has dropped since our last major survey of attitudes toward local news in 2018, mirroring declining attention to national news.
  • Americans still see value in local news and local journalists. A large majority say local news outlets are at least somewhat important to the well-being of their local community. Most people also say local journalists are in touch with their communities and that their local news media perform well at several aspects of their jobs, such as reporting the news accurately.
  • At the same time, a relatively small share of Americans (15%) say they have paid for local news in the last year. And many seem unaware of the major financial challenges facing local news: A 63% majority (albeit a smaller majority than in 2018) say they think their local news outlets are doing very or somewhat well financially.
  • Majorities of both major parties say local media in their area are doing their jobs well. While Republicans and GOP-leaning independents are slightly less positive than Democrats and Democratic leaners in their opinions of local media, views of local news don’t have the same stark political divides that exist within Americans’ opinions about national media .
  • Most Americans say local journalists should remain neutral on issues in their community, but a substantial minority say local journalists should take a more active role. About three-in-ten say local journalists should advocate for change in their communities, a view that’s especially common among Democrats and younger adults.

These are some of the key findings from a new Pew Research Center survey of about 5,000 U.S. adults conducted in January 2024. This is the first in a series of Pew Research Center reports on local news from the Pew-Knight Initiative, a research program funded jointly by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Americans largely hold positive views of local news organizations

At a time when many local news outlets are struggling and Americans’ trust in the news media has waned, the vast majority of U.S. adults (85%) say local news outlets are at least somewhat important to the well-being of their local community. This includes 44% who say local journalism is extremely or very important to their community

About seven-in-ten U.S. adults (69%) say that local journalists in their area are mostly in touch with their community, up from 63% who said this in 2018. And most Americans also say their local news organizations are doing well at four key roles:

A bar chart showing most Americans say local media are doing well at different aspects of reporting

  • Reporting news accurately (71%)
  • Covering the most important stories (68%)
  • Being transparent (63%)
  • Keeping an eye on local political leaders (61%).

These are relatively positive views compared with how Americans see news organizations more broadly. For instance, a 2022 Pew Research Center survey found that fewer than half of U.S. adults say that news organizations in general do a very or somewhat good job of covering the most important stories, reporting the news accurately and serving as a watchdog over elected leaders.

A bar chart showing majorities of both political parties believe their local news media do various aspects of their jobs well

What’s more, views toward local news are not as politically polarized as Americans’ opinions about the news media overall. While Republicans and GOP-leaning independents are not quite as positive as Democrats and Democratic leaners in some of their assessments of local journalists, most Republicans still say the local media in their area are doing their jobs well.

For example, roughly three-quarters of Democrats (78%) say their local media do well at reporting news accurately, compared with about two-thirds of Republicans (66%).

By comparison, the 2022 survey found that 51% of Democrats and just 17% of Republicans say that news organizations in general do a very or somewhat good job of reporting the news accurately.

Jump to more information on views toward local news organizations.

A bar chart showing declines in attention to both local and national news

Fewer Americans are closely following local news – and other types of news

Despite these positive views toward local news organizations, there are signs that Americans are engaging less with local journalism than they used to.

The share of Americans who say they follow local news very closely has fallen by 15 percentage points since 2016 (from 37% to 22%). Most U.S. adults still say they follow local news at least somewhat closely (66%), but this figure also has dropped in recent years.

A line chart showing Americans’ preferred path to local news is moving online

This trend is not unique to local news – Americans’ attention to national and international news also has declined.

The local news landscape is becoming more digital

The ways in which Americans access local news are changing, reflecting an increasingly digital landscape – and matching patterns in overall news consumption habits .

Preferred pathways to local news

  • Fewer people now say they prefer to get local news through a television set (32%, down from 41% who said the same in 2018).
  • Americans are now more likely to say they prefer to get local news online, either through news websites (26%) or social media (23%). Both of these numbers have increased in recent years.
  • Smaller shares prefer getting their local news from a print newspaper or on the radio (9% each).

Specific sources for local news

The types of sources (e.g., outlets or organizations) Americans are turning to are changing as well:

A bar chart showing more Americans get local news from online forums than daily newspapers

  • While local television stations are still the most common source of local news beyond friends, family and neighbors, the share who often or sometimes get news there has declined from 70% to 64% in recent years.
  • Online forums, such as Facebook groups or the Nextdoor app, have become a more common destination for local news: 52% of U.S. adults say they at least sometimes get local news from these types of forums, up 14 percentage points from 2018. This is on par with the percentage who get local news at least sometimes from local radio stations.
  • Meanwhile, a third of Americans say they at least sometimes get local news from a daily newspaper, regardless of whether it is accessed via print, online or through a social media website – down 10 points from 2018. The share of Americans who get local news from newspapers is now roughly on par with the share who get local news from local government agencies (35%) or local newsletters or Listservs (31%).

Not only are fewer Americans getting local news from newspapers, but local daily newspapers are now more likely to be accessed online than in print.

A bar chart showing local newspapers are no longer accessed primarily through print

  • 31% of those who get news from daily newspapers do so via print, while far more (66%) do so digitally, whether through websites, apps, emails or social media posts that include content from the paper.
  • In 2018, just over half of those who got news from local daily newspapers (54%) did so from print, and 43% did so via a website, app, email or social media site.

There is a similar move toward digital access for local TV stations, though local TV news is still mostly consumed through a TV set.

  • In 2024, 62% of those getting news from local TV stations do so through a television, compared with 37% who do so through one of the digital pathways.
  • An even bigger majority of local TV news consumers (76%) got that news through a TV set in 2018.

Jump to more information on how people access local news.

The financial state of local news

The turmoil for the local news industry in recent years has come with major financial challenges. Circulation and advertising revenue for newspapers have seen sharp declines in the last decade, according to our analysis of industry data , and other researchers have documented that thousands of newspapers have stopped publishing in the last two decades. There also is evidence of audience decline for local TV news stations, although advertising revenue on local TV has been more stable.

A bar chart showing the share who think their local news is doing well financially has fallen since 2018 but is still a majority

When asked about the financial state of the news outlets in their community, a majority of Americans (63%) say they think their local news outlets are doing very or somewhat well, with a third saying that they’re not doing too well or not doing well at all. This is a slightly more pessimistic view than in 2018, when 71% said their local outlets were doing well, though it is still a relatively positive assessment of the financial state of the industry.

Just 15% of Americans say they have paid or given money to any local news source in the past year – a number that has not changed much since 2018. The survey also asked Americans who did not pay for news in the past year the main reason why not. The most common explanation is that people don’t pay because they can find plenty of free local news, although young adults are more inclined to say they just aren’t interested enough in local news to pay for it.

Jump to more information on how people view the financial state of local news.

Other key findings in this report

A bar chart showing weather, crime, traffic and government are all commonly followed local news topics

Americans get local news about a wide variety of topics. Two-thirds or more of U.S. adults at least sometimes get news about local weather, crime, government and politics, and traffic and transportation, while smaller shares (but still at least half) say they get local news about arts and culture, the economy, schools, and sports.

Relatively few Americans are highly satisfied with the coverage they see of many topics. The survey also asked respondents who at least sometimes get each type of local news how satisfied they are with the news they get. With the exception of weather, fewer than half say they are extremely or very satisfied with the quality of the news they get about each topic. For example, about a quarter of those who consume news about their local economy (26%) say they are extremely or very satisfied with this news. Read more about different local news topics in Chapter 2.

A bar chart showing younger adults are more likely to say that local journalists should advocate for change in the community

When asked whether local journalists should remain neutral on community issues or advocate for change in the community, a majority of Americans (69%) say journalists should remain neutral, reflecting more traditional journalistic norms. However, 29% say that local journalists should be advocating for change in their communities. Younger adults are the most likely to favor advocacy by journalists: 39% of those ages 18 to 29 say that local journalists should push for change, as do 34% of those 30 to 49. Read more about Americans’ views of the role of local journalists in Chapter 4.

Americans who feel a strong sense of connection to their community are more likely to engage with local news, say that local news outlets are important to the community, and rate local media more highly overall. For example, 66% of those who say they are very attached to their community say local news outlets are extremely or very important to the well-being of their local community, compared with 46% of those who are somewhat attached and 31% of those who are not very or not at all attached to their community.

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  • Internet & Technology
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  • Other Topics
  • Politics & Policy
  • Race & Ethnicity
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ABOUT PEW RESEARCH CENTER  Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of  The Pew Charitable Trusts .

Copyright 2024 Pew Research Center

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  • Test for Fentanyl
  • if You Think Someone is Overdosing
  • Stop Overdose
  • Naloxone FAQs
  • Stigma Reduction

About Stop Overdose

  • Through preliminary research and strategic workshops, CDC identified four areas of focus to address the evolving drug overdose crisis.
  • Stop Overdose resources speak to the reality of drug use, provide practical ways to prevent overdoses, educate about the risks of illegal drug use, and show ways to get help.

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Drugs take nearly 300 lives every day. 1 To address the increasing number of overdose deaths related to both prescription opioids and illegal drugs, we created a website to educate people who use drugs about the dangers of illegally manufactured fentanyl, the risks and consequences of mixing drugs, the lifesaving power of naloxone, and the importance of reducing stigma around recovery and treatment options. Together, we can stop drug overdoses and save lives.

What you can do

  • Get the facts on fentanyl
  • Learn about lifesaving naloxone
  • Understand the risks of polysubstance use
  • Reduce stigma around recovery and treatment

Explore and download Stop Overdose and other educational materials on CDC's Overdose Resource Exchange .

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. National Vital Statistics System, Mortality 2018-2021 on CDC WONDER Online Database, released in 2023. Data are from the Multiple Cause of Death Files, 2018-2021, as compiled from data provided by the 57 vital statistics jurisdictions through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Accessed at http://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd-icd10-expanded.html on Mar 5, 2024

Every day, drugs claim hundreds of lives. The Stop Overdose website educates drug users on fentanyl, naloxone, polysubstance use, and dealing with stigma.

Aquaculture

Sea Grant invests in the development of sustainable marine and Great Lakes aquaculture to help coastal communities maintain a safe and sustainable local seafood supply. Sea Grant’s investment in aquaculture focuses on research and technology transfer, often through one-on-one interactions with extension agents, to support and expand America’s aquaculture industry. Questions about Sea Grant’s aquaculture work or the aquaculture funding opportunity may be directed to  [email protected] . Check out our related subjects: 

  • Seafood Resources
  • Young Fisherman’s Development Program

Maine Sea Grant provides research and technical assistance to Maine’s oyster growers. Photo credit: Christopher Katalinas, National Sea Grant Office

From FY 2018 to 2022, Sea Grant’s average annual federal investment of $16.3 million in aquaculture resulted in a yearly average* of:

PUBLICATIONS

*Metrics are direct results of Sea Grant work between February 1, 2018 and January 31, 2023, as reported by Sea Grant programs through June 2023. Sea Grant’s average annual federal investment during this time = $16.3 million. Sea Grant Investment = Funding to advance aquaculture research, technology transfer, and extension. Economic impact = market and non-market value of Sea Grant’s work related to aquaculture; value of jobs and businesses. Businesses = the number of aquaculture businesses created or sustained as a result of Sea Grant efforts. Jobs = aquaculture jobs created or sustained as a result of Sea Grant efforts.

Meet the Experts

Michael Chambers, Ph.D.

Reference Resources

research project ideas year 12

Story Highlights

research project ideas year 12

Science & Seafood

Sea Grant invests in the development of sustainable marine and Great Lakes aquaculture businesses to help coastal communities maintain a safe and sustainable local seafood supply that complements, not replaces, wild-caught fisheries.

research project ideas year 12

Sea Grant Knows Oysters

Here at Sea Grant, we study oysters (a lot!), and we support hundreds of small businesses that grow, harvest, and serve oysters by providing training and technical assistance.

research project ideas year 12

Resources from NOAA Fisheries

Read more about what NOAA is doing for aquaculture at the NOAA Fisheries website.

  • More information on aquaculture in the U.S.  (NOAA Office of Aquaculture)
  • NOAA Fisheries’ Guide to Federal Aquaculture Grant Services
  • NOAA Aquaculture Strategic Plan (2023–2028)

Featured Aquaculture Research

research project ideas year 12

Sea Grant Continues to Support the U.S. Aquaculture Industry with FY23 Investments

research project ideas year 12

Wisconsin Sea Grant Helps Launch Innovative Salmon-Raising Business

research project ideas year 12

South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium Partnership Supports Aquaculture Business Development by Increasing Oyster Seed Availability

Maine Sea Grant provides funding support to explore eel aquaculture in Maine. Photo credit: Christopher Katalinas, National Sea Grant Office

Maine Sea Grant Works to Advance American eel Aquaculture in the U.S.

research project ideas year 12

Sea Grant Integrated Program Expands Oyster Farming Industry in Alabama

research project ideas year 12

New Report Identifies Next Steps for Offshore Aquaculture in Southern California

Aquaculture funding.

  • Sea Grant Continues to Support the U.S. Aquaculture Industry with FY23 Investments (2023)
  • Sea Grant Projects Provide $3.3M in Support of Seafood Industry Workforce Development (2023)
  • NOAA Sea Grant Announces $14 Million in Investments to Strengthen U.S. Aquaculture (2022)
  • NOAA Sea Grant and Ocean Acidification Program Projects to Examine Impacts of Stressors on Shellfish Aquaculture (2021)
  • Sea Grant Selects “Food From the Sea” Career Program Development Projects (2021)
  • NOAA Sea Grant Awards $3.5 Million to Improve Sustainable Aquaculture, Strengthen Seafood Resources (2021)
  • Sea Grant Awards $4.7 Million to Strengthen Economics of U.S. Aquaculture (2021)
  • National Sea Grant Aquaculture Initiative: 2020 Update
  • Sea Grant Responds to COVID-19-Related Challenges Across the Country  (2020)
  • Sea Grant awards $16 million to advance U.S. aquaculture (2019)
  • Sea Grant Announces 2018 Aquaculture Research Awards (2018)
  • 2023 – Aquaculture Workforce Development Projects
  • 2022/2023 – Aquaculture Economics & Markets Collaborative; Aquaculture Technologies & Education Awards; Aquaculture Supplemental Funding (PDF)
  • 2022 – Early Stage Propagation Strategies; Marine Finfish Juvenile Production Technologies; Advanced Aquaculture Collaboratives Continued; Aquaculture Information Exchange Creation (PDF)
  • 2021 – eeBLUE Aquaculture Literacy Mini-Grants Program
  • 2021 – Addressing the Impacts of Multiple Stressors on Shellfish Aquaculture through Research/Industry Partnerships (PDF)
  • 2021 – “Food From the Sea” Careers Program (PDF)
  • 2021 – Addressing COVID-19 Impacts to Seafood Resources (PDF)
  • 2021 – Addressing Economic and Marketing Needs of the U.S. Aquaculture Industry (PDF)
  • 2020 – Aquaculture Supplemental Funding (PDF)
  • 2020 – COVID-19 Rapid Response Funding (PDF)
  • 2019 – Advanced Aquaculture Collaborative Programs – Hubs; Exploring New Aquaculture Opportunities; Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research Needs in Aquaculture (PDF)
  • 2018 – Sea Grant National Aquaculture Initiative
  • 2017 – Integrated Projects to Advance Aquaculture  (PDF)
  • 2017 – Addressing Impediments to Aquaculture  (PDF)
  • 2016 – Research  (PDF)
  • 2016 – Workshops/Trainings  (PDF)
  • 2015  (PDF)
  • 2014  (PDF)
  • 2013  (PDF)
  • 2012  (PDF)

Aquaculture Hubs

As part of Sea Grant’s  2019 National Aquaculture Initiative , 11 funded projects are focused on accelerating the development of specific aquaculture topics through integrated teams of professionals. These teams established collaborative programs, commonly referred to as “Hubs”, to plan for and appropriately focus the next generation of aquaculture investments while enhancing the synthesis and transfer of past research advances to the industry.

Aquaculture Hub Links:

  • East Coast Hard Clam Selective Breeding Collaborative
  • Atlantic and Gulf Shellfish Seed Biosecurity Collaborative
  • Great Lakes Aquaculture Collaborative
  • Hawai’i-Pacific Aquaculture Consortium
  • Indigenous Aquaculture Collaborative
  • Maine Aquaculture Hub
  • Recirculating Aquaculture Salmon Network
  • Seaweed Hub
  • Southern New England Shellfish Aquaculture Hub
  • West Coast Aquaculture Collaborative

NATIONAL AQUACULTURE SYMPOSIA

In Fall 2021, the National Sea Grant Office hosted two Aquaculture Research Symposia to bring together researchers and their teams involved in projects funded through the 2019 National Strategic Initiative competitions. Awardees shared their work and findings with members of the aquaculture community through live talks, followed by time for discussion. Please see the links below for PDFs of project presentations.

The first symposium was held October 25-29, 2021 and focused on projects funded through the “Exploring New Aquaculture Opportunities” and the “Social/Behavioral/Economic Needs in Aquaculture” competitions.

  • Download Exploring New Aquaculture Opportunities Presentations
  • Download Social/Behavioral/Economic Needs in Aquaculture Presentations

The second symposium was held November 1-3, 2021 and focused on projects funded through the “Advanced Aquaculture Research Collaboratives” (Hubs) competition.

  • Download Advanced Aquaculture Research Collaboratives Presentations

Aquaculture News

Oysters in a pair of gloved hands

NOAA Sea Grant Develops 5-Year Aquaculture Investment Plan

Year-over-year, Sea Grant is committed to supporting aquaculture development across the nation, as a means of enhancing economic resilience and nutritional security in American communities. Sea Grant recently developed a five-year Aquaculture Investment Plan to guide its efforts in supporting aquaculture research, extension and education.

In fiscal year 2023, Sea Grant invested $14 million in federal funding to support several new initiatives, including the Aquaculture Economics and Markets Collaborative, Aquaculture Technologies and Education Awards, Aquaculture Supplemental Awards and the previously announced Seafood Industry Workforce Development Awards. In addition, fiscal year 2023 investments supported the continuation of Early Stage Propagation Strategies for Aquaculture Species Awards, Marine Finfish Aquaculture Juvenile Production Technologies Awards, Advanced Aquaculture Collaboratives, and the Aquaculture Information Exchange.

research project ideas year 12

Virginia Sea Grant Launches the USDA and NOAA-Supported Aquaculture Information Exchange Online Community Platform

The Aquaculture Information Exchange (AIE) online community platform website is now live and open for new user registrations. The AIE represents a joint effort between NOAA’s National Sea Grant Office, NOAA’s Fisheries Office of Aquaculture, USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), and Virginia Sea Grant.

Learn More About Aquaculture

Careers in Mariculture — from North Carolina Sea Grant

Careers in Mariculture — from North Carolina Sea Grant

Facilitating the Expansion of U.S. Marine Aquaculture

Facilitating the Expansion of U.S. Marine Aquaculture

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces Notice of Funding Opportunity for fiscal year 2021 Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act

decorative blue wavy line graphic

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently accepting project proposals to protect, restore and enhance Great Lakes fish and wildlife habitat under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act. We request interested entities to submit restoration, research and regional project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources, as authorized under the act (16 USC 941c). The purpose of the act is to provide assistance to states, tribes and other interested entities to encourage cooperative conservation, restoration and management of fish and wildlife resources and their habitats in the Great Lakes Basin. The deadline for proposal submission is Tuesday, February 16, 2021 by 5:00 p.m. EST.

A total of approximately $1.79 million is projected to support projects this fiscal year. Available funding and project awards are subject to final Congressional appropriations for fiscal year 2021. Project funding is available to support Great Lakes Basin restoration, research and regional projects. Tribes, states, municipalities, local watershed associations and non-governmental organizations are encouraged to apply.

The 2016 reauthorization of the Act made significant additions to allowable sources of non-federal match as it relates to time period, and land and conservation easements. See the Notice of Funding Opportunity F12AS00187 for details . All project proposals will be reviewed, scored and ranked by the Proposal Review Committee. We will make final funding decisions in early to late summer of 2021.

Read more details on the announcement and how to apply.

Latest Press Releases

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COMMENTS

  1. 100 Interesting Research Paper Topics for High Schoolers

    For example, last year over 4000 students applied for 500 spots in the Lumiere Research Scholar Program, a rigorous research program founded by Harvard researchers. The program pairs high-school students with Ph.D. mentors to work 1-on-1 on an independent research project .

  2. 113 Great Research Paper Topics

    113 Great Research Paper Topics. One of the hardest parts of writing a research paper can be just finding a good topic to write about. Fortunately we've done the hard work for you and have compiled a list of 113 interesting research paper topics. They've been organized into ten categories and cover a wide range of subjects so you can easily ...

  3. Biology Research Projects for High School Students

    Animals, Plants, and Nature Project Ideas. Next up, we'll discuss the biology research projects related to animals, plants, and nature. These environments are very close to human and they are definitely very interesting to explore. 1. Examining the Impact of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes on Disease Rates.

  4. 170+ Research Topics In Education (+ Free Webinar)

    A comprehensive list of research topics and ideas in education, along with a list of existing dissertations & theses covering education. ... K-12, public school district (Scarbrough, 2020) ... Please I am in need of proposed project topics to help with my final year thesis. Reply. Ellyjoy on November 20, 2023 at 12:28 am

  5. Resources

    Quick facts about the Research Project. It is a compulsory SACE subject. It is worth 10 credits. Students need to achieve a C- grade or higher to gain their SACE. It is mostly undertaken by students in Year 12. A research project can be scientific, artistic, sporting, or historical; it can be a community-based project, or any number of other ...

  6. Twelfth Grade Science Projects

    Twelfth Grade Science Projects. (177 results) Science Buddies' twelfth grade science projects are the perfect way for twelfth grade students to have fun exploring science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Our twelfth grade projects are written and tested by scientists and are specifically created for use by students in the twelfth grade.

  7. How to ace the Research Project in SACE

    Unlike your other SACE stage 2 subjects being 20 credits, the research project is a 10-credit SACE subject you will either complete in year 11 or 12 depending on which high school you attend. The subject consists of three parts: the folio, outcome, and review for research project A or the evaluation if you are undertaking research project B.

  8. Student stories

    "When I finished my Year 12 exams I used my research notes to actually build it." The Crystal Brook student says undertaking the Research Project provided him with new life-long skills. "I was challenged to engage in in-depth analysis of the sourced information and analyse what that would mean for my project - something I hadn't ever done much ...

  9. Examples of Student Research Projects

    Research Proposals including Research Plans ; Coming Up With a Research Question; Getting Ethics Approval; Struggling with a Literature Review; Qualitative, Quantitative or Mixed-Methods ; Data Collection; Working with Primary Data ; Using the Internet for Research; Data Management; Writing Up Your Research ; Preparing for the Research Project

  10. Year 12 Research Projects 2023/24

    Welcome to Imperial College London Mathematics School. We are a specialist maths school for 16 to 19 year olds working in partnership with Imperial College London. In September 2023, we opened our doors to our first group of Year 12 students. You can find our building on a site adjacent to Woodhouse College in Barnet, North London.

  11. 66 Research Ideas for Your Next Project or Assignment

    66 research ideas Here are 66 research ideas divided into categories to help you generate your next research topic: Health research ideas Here are some research ideas related to health:. Diagnostic testing: You can use this topic to write about a specific type of test, such as x-ray technology, or you could compare several tests. Allergy and asthma: You can study the effects or causes of ...

  12. Science Fair Project Ideas for 12th Graders

    High school seniors should be able to identify a project idea on their own and can conduct the science fair project and report on it without much assistance. Most 12th-grade science fair projects will involve proposing a hypothesis and testing it with an experiment. Advanced models and inventions offer other options for a successful 12th-grade ...

  13. 50 Mini-Lessons For Teaching Students Research Skills

    It outlines a five-step approach to break down the research process into manageable chunks. This post shares ideas for mini-lessons that could be carried out in the classroom throughout the year to help build students' skills in the five areas of: clarify, search, delve, evaluate, and cite. It also includes ideas for learning about staying ...

  14. Research Project Portfolio

    19 Pages • Essays / Projects • Year Uploaded: 2023. 19 Page Research Project Portfolio, includes ideas to add to fill pages. B+ grade

  15. Science Projects

    Over 1,200 free science projects for K-12. Browse by subject, grade level, or try our Topic Selection Wizard to find your winning science project. With science projects in 32 different areas of science from astronomy to zoology, we've got something for everyone! Let us help you find a science project that fits your interests, with our Topic ...

  16. 10 Good Research Topics for Kids

    Coming up with interesting research topics for each child in your class can be time-consuming. So take a look at this list of 10 good research topics for kids. ... Year 6 - Year 9 . 14+ years old . Year 9+ Free ... The benefits of research projects are endless! They are an amazing way for kids to practice working and thinking independently ...

  17. Year 12 Senior Research Projects

    Project Presentations - Friday 20 October & saturday 21 October 2023. Introducing the 2023 Year 12 students and their Senior Research Projects. The presentations will be on Friday 21 October and Saturday 22 October. All are welcome to attend. Program details below.

  18. 60 Senior Project Ideas for High School Students

    She served as a graduate instructor at the University of Illinois, a tutor at St Peter's School in Philadelphia, and an academic writing tutor and thesis mentor at Wesleyan's Writing Workshop. Senior Project Ideas - We offer 60 senior project ideas for high school students in areas such as politics, business, the arts, and more.

  19. Fun Research Projects for Young Students

    Planets. For this project, students will choose a planet or have one assigned to them. They will research their planet, taking note of information like how long a year and a day are on their planet, what the temperature is, what the surface of the planet is like and any other facts and points of interest they discover.

  20. The Ultimate List of Interesting Research Topics for Kids

    Other interesting research topics for kids related to Ancient Civilizations: The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World - Great Pyramids of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Statue of Zeus, Temple of Artemis, Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, Colossus of Rhodes, Pharos of Alexandria. The Epic of Gilgamesh.

  21. 10 Good Research Topics for Kids

    Ancient Civilizations. Last but certainly not least is Ancient Civilizations! This is a really good research topic for kids because there are so many ancient civilizations to choose from. Some examples of ancient civilizations are the Greeks, Incas, Aztecs, Egyptians, Maya, Persian, Roman, and Chinese.

  22. How to write a discussion text

    Set them the challenge of writing their own discussion piece on a topic using all the techniques outlined by Leah. You could also use the detailed explanation of writing in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd ...

  23. New $90 Million Project to Create Digital Research Hub Focused on K-12

    Contributing Writer. The National Science Foundation has awarded Rice University $90 million to build what is being described as a first-of-its-kind education research hub that will leverage data from an array of major digital learning platforms currently serving tens of millions of students. The university recently announced the investment as ...

  24. VE Day

    Teacher Notes. If your class has watched all ten episodes, they could celebrate the end of the unit by organising a 1940's style street party. They could use their maths skills to work out a ...

  25. Overview

    In the Research Project, you will have the opportunity to study an area of interest in depth. It will require you to use your creativity and initiative, while developing the research and presentation skills you will need in further study or work. Welcome to your Research Project. Key documents. 2023 Research Project Subject Assessment Advice.docx.

  26. Americans' Changing Relationship With Local News

    The share of Americans who say they follow local news very closely has fallen by 15 percentage points since 2016 (from 37% to 22%). Most U.S. adults still say they follow local news at least somewhat closely (66%), but this figure also has dropped in recent years. This trend is not unique to local news - Americans' attention to national and ...

  27. 10 Good Research Topics for Kids

    Coming up with interesting research topics for each child in your class can be time-consuming. So take a look at this list of 10 good research topics for kids. ... Year 7 - Year 9 . 14+ years old . Year 10+ Free ... The benefits of research projects are endless! They are an amazing way for kids to practice working and thinking independently ...

  28. About Stop Overdose

    Key points. Through preliminary research and strategic workshops, CDC identified four areas of focus to address the evolving drug overdose crisis. Stop Overdose resources speak to the reality of drug use, provide practical ways to prevent overdoses, educate about the risks of illegal drug use, and show ways to get help.

  29. Aquaculture

    Summary fact sheet of the 10-year NOAA Sea Grant Aquaculture Vision, 2016 (pdf) ... Aquaculture Initiative, 11 funded projects are focused on accelerating the development of specific aquaculture topics through integrated teams of professionals. These teams established collaborative programs, commonly referred to as "Hubs", to plan for and ...

  30. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces Notice of Funding Opportunity

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently accepting project proposals to protect, restore and enhance Great Lakes fish and wildlife habitat under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act. We request interested entities to submit restoration, research and regional project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources, as authorized under the act (16 USC ...