How to Write & Pass a GED Essay

By: Jen Denton, Student Success Coach on January 3, 2023 at 3:21 AM

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The GED essay intimidates a lot of people. Writing a whole essay from scratch in 45 minutes or less can be tough, but it doesn't have to be. This GED essay writing guide will help you know what to expect and how to pass the written portion of the test. Learn all about the GED extended response with examples, tips, and a breakdown of everything you'll be graded on.

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What is the ged essay, example ged essay questions, example ged essay, ged essay practice, ged essay structure, how is the ged essay scored, 8 tips to help you pass the ged essay.

The GED test is made up of four subjects: mathematical reasoning, social studies, science, and reasoning through language arts (RLA). The RLA subject test includes two parts, one of which is the GED extended response, sometimes called the GED essay. You will have 45 minutes to complete the essay to the best of your ability. If you don’t finish in time, don’t worry! The essay is only worth 20% of your final RLA score, so you can still pass the test even if you don’t get a high score on the essay.

The extended response can be on a variety of topics, but it will always follow the same format. You will be given two different articles on the same topic, usually argumentative essays with a firm position. You will be asked to evaluate the two arguments and write your own argumentative essay determining which article presented the strongest position. The essay should be 3-5 paragraphs long, with each paragraph between 3-7 sentences.

All GED essay questions will ask you to read and evaluate two passages that take different stances on the same topic. Essays should determine which passage presents a stronger argument and back up that claim with analysis of evidence from the passages.

Here is an example GED essay question:

Analyze the arguments presented in the press release and the letter to the editor. In your response, develop an argument in which you explain how one position is better supported than the other. Incorporate relevant and specific evidence from both sources to support your argument.

Remember, the better-argued position is not necessarily the position with which you agree. This task should take approximately 45 minutes to complete. 1

1  "Extended Response Scoring - GED." https://ged.com/wp-content/uploads/extended_response_scoring.pdf . Accessed 25 Feb. 2021.

The following is an example high scoring essay:

Both the press release and the letter to the editor offer positions that are supported by both fact and opinion. The press release seeks to exhort the new bill for expansion of Highway 17, while the letter argues that the passing of the bill could prove detrimental to the district. While both sides make an acceptable case, the latter provides a stronger argument.

One example of the letter’s stronger argument is the explanation that federal tax dollars pay for the road, as it will incorporate six different states, therefore eliminating this particular state’s ability to strike the bill down. This proves, with factual information, that the district did not have a fair say in the bill. The notion that few residents will use the road that their tax dollars are providing is an opinion. However, a resident and small-business owner in the town is more credible in the awareness of the town’s concern, as compared to a representative who attended a few meetings in the town hall.

Another example of the better supported argument in the letter is the reference to the construction jobs as temporary. The press release praises the new jobs created by the highway construction, as this is a valid point. However, the author of the letter is correct in the fact that the jobs will not create a boom in the district’s economy, or fill in the gap caused by the closures in the manufacturing plants, as the press release leads listeners to believe. The road construction does not solve the long-term issue of unemployment in the town. In addition, the author of the letter counters the argument that new motels, restaurants, and gas stations along the highway will create permanent jobs for the residents of the town. She explains that, “…only minimum wage jobs will remain.” This is a valid argument also, as unemployed residents that need enough income to support a household would not be much better off. Providing restaurant or motel jobs is very unlikely to feed or support an entire family. It will not pick up the laid-off employees of the manufacturing plants, who may have worked for many years towards promotions and a pension.

Another example of the letter’s stronger argument is the author’s explanation of the 2001 study. She concedes that the representative is correct in citing that bypasses are proven to reduce noise and traffic in town, but she argues that the study shows a negative effect on local businesses. This piece of the study was not mentioned by Representative Walls or the press release, and it is a proven fact. This draws more credibility to the argument in the letter. Also, although it is a speculation, it is more reasonable that traveler’s will stick to the main highway and not venture miles off their path into small town when chain gas stations, restaurants, and motels are conveniently located directly at the highway exits. It is less likely that old roads in the towns will become historical locations, attracting tourists and boosting small business sales.

Despite the argument and evidence given by the press release, it appears that the letter to the editor offers a stronger case. The author’s ideas are backed up by logical explanations and facts with a few speculations. Though the press release offers some fact, it is mainly specked with anticipations and hopes, driven to overshadow any doubts and quell any concerns. The letter is penned by a resident of the town and owner of a business, subject to firsthand opinions of the citizens of the district. The press release is pushed by an elected representative who, upon visiting the town a number of times and consulting a small percentage of the constituents, is convinced she understands the majority. Although both parties may very well have the best interests of the district in mind, and either position could be correct, it is clear that the letter provides a better-supported argument. 2

2  "Extended Response Scoring - GED." https://ged.com/wp-content/uploads/extended_response_scoring.pdf . Accessed 25 Feb. 2021.

For GED essay practice, try writing your own essay based on the example above. Set a timer for 45 minutes and do your best to write an essay with your own analysis and ideas.

You can practice more writing skills with this free test or enroll today in the GED Academy to get access to more GED essay prompts and personalized feedback from GED Essay graders.

The structure for the GED essay can take a few different forms, depending on how you decide to organize your ideas. No matter what, it should include an introduction paragraph, 1-3 body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. To receive a passing score, your essay must present a clear topic supported by details from both passages. Include your main idea in an introductory paragraph. In middle paragraphs, make connections between your details and your main idea. Your conclusion should also fit logically with the details.

The introduction should demonstrate your understanding of the overall topic based on the passages you read and a claim. The claim is a statement of your argument. It doesn’t need to go into detail, but should state your essay’s position on the questions presented.

The body paragraphs will go into more detail. They will include a combination of summary, analysis, and evidence to back up your claim. Be sure to include analysis of both passages.

The conclusion should explain the result of your findings and reinforce your original claim.

You can earn up to six points on the GED extended response. There are three main categories your essay is graded on, and you can earn up to two points for each.

Creation of arguments and use of evidence: Craft a strong claim and use analysis of the arguments and evidence from the passages to support it.

Development of ideas and organizational structure: Write a substantial essay with clear transitions between ideas, including a strong introduction and conclusion.

Clarity and command of standard English conventions: Use appropriate language and demonstrate strong language and grammar skills.

The extended response accounts for 20% of the total RLA score.

  • Read all the instructions. The most common reason people score low on the essay is because they misunderstand the prompt.
  • Make an outline. After reading the passages and the prompt, write down your ideas and organize them during your pre-writing.
  • Make a list of evidence. When you read the passages, take notes on the important details you want to remember later, so you don’t have to spend time searching for it later.
  • Write your introduction last. A lot of people get tripped up by how to start the essay. If that’s you, just skip this step and go back to it once you’ve written the rest of the essay.
  • Write first, edit later. You only have 45 minutes, so use your time wisely. Write your first draft of the essay before you start fine-tuning and editing it. Save that for your remaining time so you don’t turn in a half-written essay.
  • Use formal language. Avoid “I” statements like, “I think” or casual language like slang.
  • Don’t check the clock. Time always seems to go faster when you need it to go slow. Every time you look at the clock, that’s breaking your focus on your essay.
  • Practice! The only way to get better at writing essays is to write more essays. Practice using the GED Writing Practice Test , and remember to time yourself!

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One part of the GED Reasoning through Language Arts (RLA) test is writing a GED Essay, also known as the Extended Response. You have 45 minutes to create your essay. The GED essay is an argumentative essay.

A common method for writing this type of essay is the five-paragraph approach.

Writing your GED Essay is not about writing an opinion on the topic at hand. Your opinion is irrelevant. You are asked to determine and explain which of the arguments is better.

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Table of Contents

  • 0.1 Video Transcription
  • 1 GED Essay Structure
  • 2 GED Essay Topics
  • 3 GED Essay Samples
  • 4 Tips for Writing your GED Essay
  • 5 How your GED Essay is Scored

Video Transcription

After reading the stimulus with two different arguments about a subject, your task is to explain why one of these arguments is better.

Remember, when writing your GED Essay, you are NOT writing your opinion on the topic. That’s irrelevant. You must write about why one argument is better than the other.

You are writing an analysis of the author’s two positions and explaining which argument is stronger. These two arguments are presented in the stimulus, so you don’t need to create any own examples.

So again, you only need to decide what argument is stronger and claim it and prove it. It is NOT about your opinion.

Since in your essay, you need to determine which argument is best supported, your claim should clearly state which of the two positions is stronger.

You will be provided with the stimulus material and a prompt.

The stimulus is a text that provides 2 opposing opinions about a certain subject. The prompt provides instructions and tells you what you need to do.

I’ll say it again because so many students make mistakes here, it’s NOT about your opinion on the topic but the subject that matters!

You need to analyze the arguments and determine which opinion is best supported throughout the text.

You are NOT asked which argument you agree with more, and you should NEVER respond with a personal opinion.

So, don’t use the word “I” such as “I think that…” “I agree because…” “In my opinion…”.

The GED essay is graded on a machine that uses algorithms to figure out your score.

So, no teacher will decide about the score in any way.

It’s very important that you remember this!

Let’s take a look at the structure, topics, and format of the GED Essay.

GED Essay Structure

Ged essay topics.

  • GED Essay Sample
  • GED Essay Scoring
  • GED Essay Writing Tips

Remember: you need to analyze which of the presented arguments is better and explain why it’s better.

Likewise, make sure your reasons come from the text – you aren’t making up your examples; you’re talking about the ones in the passages.

How should you prove that one argument is stronger? – Look at the evidence in the text.

Did the author use a relevant statistic from a reliable source, or did he/she assume something with a hypothetical anecdote?

Once you know which is better supported, you’re on your way.

Keep in mind: Don’t Summarize!

It’s easy to substitute a simpler task (summarize each side) for the more complex task of evaluating arguments. But if all you do is summarize, your response will be considered off-topic and likely will not receive any points.

The GED Essay should contain:

  • 4-7 paragraphs of 3 to 7 sentences each and 300-500 words in total.
  • An essay (or response) that is significantly shorter could put you in danger of scoring a 0 just for not showing enough of your writing skills.
  • As you read the stimulus material (text), think carefully about the argumentation presented in the passage(s). “Argumentation” refers to the assumptions, claims, support, reasoning, and credibility on which a position is based.
  • Pay close attention to how the author(s) use these strategies to convey his or her position.

Every well-written GED essay has an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

Your response will be an argument or an argumentative essay. Remember that you are NOT writing your opinion on the topic.

You are writing an analysis of two of the author’s positions and explaining which argument is stronger.

Things to keep in mind: the Extended Response (GED Essay) is scored by smart machines that are programmed to recognize correct answers. So, don’t try to be creative; just be correct. Also:

  • Use proper grammar and sentence structure.
  • Practice writing a 300 to 500-word essay.

Let’s look at the GED Essay structure: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

  • The Introduction introduces the topic you are writing about and states your claim or thesis statement. Stand your position.
  • The Body of the essay presents reasoning and evidence to support your claim. This is the longest part of the response and should be at least two paragraphs.
  • The concluding paragraph sums up your main points and restates your claim.

Here are a few examples of GED Essay Topics. Click on the title to read a full stimulus and a prompt.

An Analysis of Daylight-Saving Time

The article presents arguments from both supporters and critics of Daylight-Saving Time who disagree about the practice’s impact on energy consumption and safety. Check here to read the full article.

Should the Penny Stay in Circulation?

Analyze the presented arguments and decide which one is better supported. Check here to read the full article.

Is Golf a Sport?

Proponents say that golf meets the definition of “sport.” Opponents say that golf better meets the definition of “game” than “sport. Analyze both opinions and determine which one is better supported. Check here to read the full article.

GED Essay Samples

Click here to access a sample of a GED essay with an explanation of the structure. Getting familiar with GED essay samples will help you plan your essay and understand what elements are important.

When reading the essay subject, you really should take the time to pull together your thoughts. By arranging your ideas rationally, you will be able to express your thoughts far better on paper. When you start writing, concentrate on the guidelines that you came to understand in English class.

Pay attention to English language usage (grammar); you must use the right punctuation and capitalization and decide on suitable word solutions.

Check here to read a GED Essay Sample with our comments.

Tips for Writing your GED Essay

1. Make sure you read the stimulus and prompt cautiously

It’s good to practice this carefully. Check out each question carefully and take a little time to figure out the topic and what kind of answer will be expected.

It is important to read the questions meticulously.

Usually, students simply run over stimulus and prompt and begin to write immediately, believing that they will save time this way.

Well, this actually the most undesirable thing to do. Take a short while and try to understand the questions completely in order to respond to them appropriately. If you wish, highlight the essential words and phrases in the stimulus to be able to look at it from time to time to be certain you stick to the topic.

2. Sketch an outline for the essay

In general, you will only need a few minutes to plan your essay, and it is imperative to take that time. As soon as you grasp the questions entirely, and once you have scribbled down some initial ideas, make an outline of the essay and follow that.

Plan an introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this process is going to save you a lot of time and it helps establish a rational development of thoughts.

3. Stick to the subject

Each paragraph in the body of your response should explain why a piece of evidence supports your claim or disputes the opposing claim to explain your evidence.

You can describe or restate it. This shows that you understand precisely what it means and how it relates to your claim.

Cite the mentioned details or facts of a specific point and relate them to your claim.

Your response should include evidence from both passages and explain what strong evidence supports one argument and why faulty evidence weakens the other argument.

4. Proofreading and Revision

By the time you completed writing your essay, you should go back to the beginning and read your essay carefully again, as you quite easily could have forgotten a comma or have misspelled a word while writing your essay. See also this post ->  Is the GED Language Arts Test Hard?

While rereading your essay, pay close attention to whether your essay provides well-targeted points, is organized clearly, presents specific information and facts, comes with proper sentence construction, and has no grammar or spelling mistakes.

How your GED Essay is Scored

Your GED essay is scored by smart machines that are programmed to recognize correct answers. So don’t try to be creative; just be correct.

They will be using five criteria to assess your essay.

  • Organization: were you clear about the essential idea, and did you present a well-thought strategy for composing your essay?
  • Clear and swift response: did you deal with the subject adequately, without shifting from one focal point to another?
  • Progress and details: did you apply relevant examples and specific details to elaborate on your original concepts or arguments, as opposed to using lists or repeating identical information?
  • Grammar Rules of English: did you use decent writing techniques like sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, syntax, and grammar, and did you shape and edit your essay after you penned the first draft?
  • Word choice: how far did you choose and employ suitable words to indicate your points of view?

Your 45 minutes will go quickly, so focus on these important points to get the best score.

What’s important is to make a clear statement about which position is better supported. Write clear sentences and arrange paragraphs in a logical order.

GED testing includes four modules (independent subtests) in Mathematical Reasoning (Math), Reasoning through Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies that can be taken separately. You should study very well, be effective on test day, and pass the subtest(s) you registered for.

GED writing for essays may be a bit tricky, but you can store all this information for proper learning on a list and change to proper write essay techniques before test day has arrived. Just practice a lot, and you’ll see that it’ll be getting better and better. So now you know all about writing the GED Essay.

GED Essay

GED Essay: Everything You Need To Know In 2024

Learn all you need to know about the GED essay, its structure sample, topics, tips, and how it is scored in this post.

January 1, 2022

The GED essay is intimidating to many people. Writing an entire essay from scratch in 45 minutes or less may seem difficult, but it does not have to be. This GED essay writing overview will help you prepare for and learn about the written section of the exam . In this post, Get-TestPrep will show everything you need to know about GED essays , including their structure, sample topics, tips, and how they are stored .

What Is The GED Essay?

GED Essay

The GED exam consists of four subjects : Mathematical Reasoning, Social Studies, Science, and Language Arts Reasoning (RLA ). The GED extended response , sometimes known as the GED essay, is one of the two portions of the RLA subject test. You’ll have 45 minutes to finish the essay to your best capacity. Don’t worry if you don’t finish on time! Because the essay accounts for just 20% of your ultimate RLA score, you can still pass the test even if you don’t receive a high essay score.

The GED extended response can cover a wide range of topics, but it will always be formatted in the same way. You will be assigned two articles on the same topic, which will typically be argumentative essays with a firm position. You’ll be asked to assess the two arguments and create your own argumentative essay based on which article delivered the more compelling argument. The essay should be three to five paragraphs long, with each paragraph including three to seven sentences.

GED Essay Structure

An introduction, a body, and a conclusion are included in every well-written GED essay. You have to write an argument or an argumentative essay. Keep in mind that you are not expressing your own view on the subject. You’re analyzing two of the author’s points of view and determining which one is more compelling. Keep in mind that the Extended Response (GED Essay) is graded by machine intelligence that has been designed to detect the right responses. So, instead of trying to be creative, simply be accurate. Also:

  • Make sure you’re using proper grammar and sentence structure.
  • Practice writing a 300-500 word essay.

Let’s take a look at the format of a GED Essay : an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

  • The introduction outlines your claim or thesis statement and explains the topic you’re writing about. Maintain your position.
  • The body of the essay includes facts and arguments to back up your claim. This section of the response should be at least two paragraphs long.
  • The concluding paragraph restates your claim and summarises your important points.

GED Essay Topic Examples

Here are a few GED Essay Topics to get you started:

Topic 1: An Analysis of Daylight-Saving Time

The article presents arguments from proponents and opponents of Daylight Saving Time, who disagree on the practice’s impact on energy consumption and safety.

Topic 2: Should the Penny Stay in Circulation?

Analyze the arguments offered and pick which one has the most support.

Topic 3: Is Golf a Sport?

Golf , according to proponents, satisfies the criteria of “sport.” Opponents argue that golf more closely resembles a “game” than a “sport.” Analyze both points of view to see which one has the most support.

Visit our website for more topics as well as full articles on each topic and take our free latest FREE GED practice test 2024 to get ready for your exam!

GED Essay Examples

Getting to know the GED essay sample  can assist you in planning your essay and determining which elements are most vital.

When reading the essay topic, you should truly take your time to collect your views. You will be able to articulate your views better on paper if you organize your thoughts properly. Concentrate on the standards that you learned in English class before you begin writing.

Pay attention to how you use the English language (grammar); you must use proper punctuation and capitalization, and you must use appropriate word solutions.

Tips For Writing Your GED Essay

Make sure you carefully read the stimulus and prompt.

Putting this into practice is an excellent idea. Examine each question carefully and set aside some time to determine the topic and the type of response that will be requested. It is critical to read the questions thoroughly. Students frequently skip past the stimulus and prompt and get right into writing, assuming that they will save time this way. 

This is, by far, the most uninteresting thing to do. Take a few moments to attempt to fully comprehend the questions so that you can reply accurately. If you like, underline the important words and phrases in the stimulus so you can go over it again later to make sure you’re on track.

Make a rough outline for the GED language arts essay

In general, planning your essay will only take a few minutes, but it is critical that you spend that time. Make an outline of the essay and follow it as soon as you have a complete understanding of the questions and have scribbled down some early ideas.

Make an outline for your introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this procedure will save you a lot of time and aid in the development of a logical thought process.

Keep your focus on the topic

To describe your evidence, each paragraph in the body of your response should explain why a piece of evidence supports your claim or disputes the opposing claim. You have the option of describing or restarting it. This demonstrates that you know exactly what it means and how it applies to your claim. Refer to the specifics or facts of a certain issue that you’ve discussed and tie them to your claim.

Include evidence from both passages in your response, and explain why strong evidence supports one thesis and why flawed evidence undermines the other.

Revision and proofreading

By the time you’ve finished writing your essay, you should go back to the beginning and reread it attentively, since you may easily have missed a comma or misspelled a term while doing so.

Pay great attention when rereading your essay to see if it has well-targeted arguments, is arranged properly, contains particular information and facts, has good sentence construction, and has no grammatical or spelling mistakes.

Learn more about how to practice GED essays as well as the whole Language Arts section in GED Language Arts Study Guide  

How To Write a GED Essay?

When writing the GED essay, you should allocate the time as follows:

  • 3 minutes to read the directions and the topic
  • 5 minutes of prewriting (freewriting, brainstorming , grouping, mapping, etc.)
  • 3 minutes to organize (create a thesis statement or controlling idea, and summarize important points)
  • 20 minutes to draft (write the essay)
  • 8 minutes to revise (go over the essay and make adjustments to concepts)
  • 6 minutes to edit (check for grammatical and spelling errors). 

How Your GED Essay Is Scored?

Smart machines that are designed to detect the right answers score your GED essay. So don’t try to be creative; just be accurate.

They will evaluate your essay based on five factors.

  • Organization : did you give a well-thought-out approach to writing your essay and were you clear on the main idea?
  • Clear and swift response: Did you deal with the matter appropriately, without straying from one emphasis point to another, with a clear and quick response?
  • Progress and specifics: instead of utilizing lists or repeating the same material, did you use relevant instances and particular details to expound on your initial notions or arguments?
  • Grammar Rules of English: Did you apply proper writing strategies such as sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, syntax, and grammar, and did you shape and revise your essay after you finished the initial draft?
  • Word choice : How well did you pick and use appropriate phrases to express your points of view?

Your 45 minutes will fly by, so focus on these key elements to get the best score possible. What is more important is to state unequivocally which side is more popular. Check that your phrases are clear and that your paragraphs are organized logically.

Each of the four modules (independent subtests) in Mathematical Reasoning (Math), Reasoning via Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies can be taken independently. To pass the subtest(s) for which you registered, you must study thoroughly and be efficient on test day. Consider taking our GED Language Arts Practice Test for the Language Arts section.

GED essay writing can be difficult, but you can keep a list of everything you need to know and switch to proper essay writing approaches before the exam. Simply practice a lot and you’ll notice that it gets better over time. So you’ve learned everything there is to know about writing the GED Essay .

How to write an essay for the GED?

  • Read through all of the instructions.
  • Create an outline.
  • Make a list of all the evidence.
  • Last, write your introduction.
  • Write first, then edit.
  • Make use of formal language.
  • Don’t look at the time.

Is there an essay portion on the GED test?

How is the ged essay graded.

The essay is graded on a four-point scale by two certified GED essay readers. The scores of the two GED readers are averaged. If the essay achieves a score of 2 or above, it is merged with the language arts multiple-choice score to generate a composite result.

Final Words

In conclusion, this guide on the GED essay provides valuable insights and strategies to help you excel in the GED essay section. By understanding the structure of the GED essay , practicing effective writing techniques, and familiarizing yourself with the scoring rubric, you can approach the GED essay with confidence and achieve a successful outcome. Remember to plan your essay, organize your thoughts, and support your ideas with relevant examples and evidence. Additionally, refining your grammar and punctuation skills will enhance the overall quality of your writing. With consistent practice and a thorough understanding of the expectations for the GED essay, you can showcase your writing abilities and earn a strong score on the GED essay.

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How To Write The GED Essay 2024 (Extended Response)

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GED Essay

Chief of Content At Gradehacker

  • Updated on May, 2024

How to Write The GED Essay

The best strategy for writing the GED essay is:

  • Read the passages (5 minutes)
  • Analyze the data and create an outline (5 minutes)
  • Write your extended response (30 minutes)
  • Reread and edit your writing (5 minutes)

If you want a clear example of what your GED essay should like like, later in this blog you’ll find a sample.

example of a ged essay

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If you are planning on taking the GED test , you’ll eventually have to pass the GED essay .

Also known as the extended response, this assignment tests your evidence-based writing skills, and it’s where many students get stuck. However, writing the GED essay is easier than most people make it out to be .

It just takes practice and patience . And with these tips, you’ll be able to ace the test in no time!

Here at Gradehacker, we are the non-traditional adult student’s most trusted resource. Earning a GED diploma is necessary to enroll in college or access better job opportunities. We want you to be capable of writing an entire essay that will clearly show that you are up to the task .

This guide will teach you how to write a GED essay and share the best tips to make your text stand out and meet the passing score.

What Is The GED Essay?

The GED test consists of four sections:

  • Mathematics
  • Social Studies
  • English Language Arts

The Reasoning Through Language Arts exam mainly consists of multiple-choice questions but also includes the Extended Response assignment, where you have to write an essay from scratch from two passages they give you.

You’ll have 45 minutes to analyze these two texts, choose which argument presents strong evidence, and explain why each piece of evidence supports your point.

While this part only represents 20% of your Reasoning Through Language Arts exam score (meaning that you can pass the Language Arts writing test even if you perform poorly in this section), it’s key that you know how to create a well-written GED essay.

Since they are testing your analysis of arguments and writing skills, it’s your opportunity to prove that you have mastered the core elements of the entire Language Arts section.

Plus, if you are planning on pursuing a college degree, where knowing how to analyze texts and write an essay response is important, passing the GED extended response is key.

GED Essay

GED Essay Prompt

To pass the essay portion, you’ll have to read two different passages that talk about the same issue but take an opposite stance about it. Your task is to determine which position presented is better supported.

It doesn’t matter if you disagree with that position; you must defend and explain your decision using multiple pieces of evidence from the texts.

Regarding length, the essay prompt suggests that your response should be approximately four to seven paragraphs of three to seven sentences each , which should be a 300-500 word essay.

While there is no essay length requirement regarding the number of words, we recommend writing between 400 and 500 .

GED Essay Sentence Structure

So, how do you write a GED extended response? Well, It has a structure similar to an argumentative essay.

  • Introductory paragraph:

This should be a primary and short thesis statement where you clearly address which of the two passages is better supported.

  • Body paragraphs: 

Consist of three or four body paragraphs where you formulate your thesis using the text’s information as your source.

  • Conclusion paragraph:

As a final step, briefly summarize your argument and reiterate its importance. If this is not your forte, there are many conclusion tips that can help you!

How to Pass The GED Essay

Now that you understand the GED Extended Response and what you need to do, here is our essay writing guide.

You’ll find multiple tips throughout it, but essentially, to write a cohesive, well-constructed essay, you’ll have to follow this four-part strategy:

  • Read the passages
  • Analyze the data and create an outline
  • Write your extended response essay
  • Reread and edit your writing

example of a ged essay

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Read the two passages (5 min)

The first step is to read both body passages thoroughly but quickly.

You need to understand what the topic is about, and while you read the text, highlight the statistics and factual data each author uses as support.

Remember that you can have differing views on your chosen side. Recognize which stance has better sources to defend your point, and explain why in your essay.

Analyze the data and create an outline (5 min)

Once you are done reading both texts and already highlighted all the essential information the authors use, you’ll need to analyze the evidence!

While ideally, you should recognize who supports their point better in the previous step , doing it in this part will be easier as you have all the factual data on sig ht.

Usually, the text with more information highlighted will be the one that defends its stance the best . 

So, the next thing you need to do is make an outline and write down your ideas. This way, you’ll have all the information organized to begin the most crucial part of the writing process.

Write your extended response essay (30 min)

And now, with evidence highlighted and an outline created, you are ready to start writing!

If you are going for the minimum and writing a 5-paragraph essay, you’ll need at least three major ideas to develop individually in separate paragraphs.

Stick to one idea per paragraph , and include one or two of your selected pieces of evidence from the texts to organize the information better and keep a good flow.

Remember to use connectors! However, nevertheless, furthermore, additionally, and more! These vital elements will help you introduce the reason for your argument at the beginning of each paragraph.

And just like with any essay, you must use formal and academic language , but remember to be concise and straightforward. It’s the content of what you write that’s important here, so choose your words wisely to show your English language knowledge.

Plus, remember that there’s no specific word count you need to meet.

Our own pro-tip here is to write the introductory paragraph last.

Because many students struggle and waste valuable minutes when trying to begin with the introduction, you can save extra time by explaining and defending your arguments first and writing the intro once you are done.

You’ll see how easy it will be to summarize the main issue and thesis statement once you’ve already developed your points.

Since the GED essay works very similarly to an argumentative paper, there are many more pro-tips you can learn in our guide on how to write an argumentative essay . So be sure to check it out!

Reread and edit your writing (5 min)

Before submitting your essay, you must read what you wrote, check for spelling errors, and ensure that your ideas are clearly understood .

Not editing your essay can be one of your most critical mistakes!

Remember they are testing your understanding of the English language and writing skills; handing in an essay with spelling mistakes, flawed evidence, or poorly structured text can make you lose valuable points.

For this part, it’s crucial you know the most common essay mistakes so you can avoid them!

example of a ged essay

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GED Essay Sample

Follow all of these tips, and you are guaranteed to pass the GED essay!

However, here you have a   GED Testing Service’s essay example that perfectly explains how this assignment should be completed:

GED Essay

Mastering the GED Essay

Now you know how to write the GED essay!

Remember to follow our essay-writing strategy to pass the Language Arts section by demonstrating mastery of your writing skills.

You are more than capable of completing the GED test with the highest score and then applying to the best colleges to continue your educational journey .

Once you make it happen, don’t forget that if you ever need assistance with your essays or classes , Gradehacker is always here to help!

And if you need more tips on how to improve your writing skills , check out these related blog posts:

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Test Prep Toolkit

GED Extended Response Essay Prompts & Examples

A quick guide to writing an extended response for the ged language arts test.

GED® Reading & Writing Practice Test ( 25 Questions )

GED® Reading & Writing Practice ( Tons Questions )

GED® Reading and Writing Lessons ( 10 Lessons )

Check out our other Free GED© Practice Test

Many students fear the writing part of the GED test. And we understand. After all, it takes effort and time to organize your ideas, fix sentence structures, and ensure that grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling are correct. With only 45 minutes to complete your essay, how will you be able to finish your piece? Thankfully, there are ways to make this part easy for you. You don’t have to be a gifted writer to write succeed in writing a winning essay for the Extended Response portion of the GED writing test. There are tips to succeed in writing your essay.

Start reviewing with our helpful contents: GED Reasoning Through Language Arts Guide

What’s in the GED Writing Extended Response Portion of the Test?

GED test prep

This test will check how well you create arguments and use evidence. Also, it would also test your clarity and command of Standard English language.

Quick Tips to Remember When Writing Your Essay:

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  • Take a deep breath. Nervous about the test? Ease anxiety by taking deep breaths before writing your essay. Being stressed while writing might keep your focus away from the task and affect the quality of your essay.
  • Read the two passages carefully . Make sure you understand each passage before choosing your position.
  • Make an outline . Don’t write right away. Create an outline first. Choose a position that you can easily defend based on what you’ve read, then list down the main points to support this position.
  • Your essay should have:
  • 1. An introduction that states your main argument 2. At least 3 paragraphs with your supporting evidence 3. A conclusion that restates your main argument and main points.
  • Focus on the first and last paragraphs first . This will help you stick to your argument and main points.
  • Be clear . The paragraphs in between your first and last paragraphs should clearly explain your main points. Start each paragraph by stating the main point that you want to talk about.
  • Proofread your work . Check your work for grammar and spelling errors. Improve sentence structures with the time that’s left.

Keep in mind that the saying, “practice makes perfect” applies here. Mastering essay writing takes a lot of practice and reading. Begin practicing your writing as well improving your comprehension skills with our Free GED Practice Tests for Language Arts. We also recommend reading high-quality newspapers, publications, and literary pieces to help build your English writing skills.

Related Topics:

  • 7 Top Jobs For GED Graduates: Earn Six Figure Income Without A College Degree
  • GED Reading Practice Test
  • Reasoning Through Language Arts
  • GED Reasoning through Language Arts
  • GED Reasoning through Language Art PRACTICE TEST
  • GED Math Practice Questions | Fractions
  • GED® Reasoning Through Language Arts Practice Tests
  • GED Science Practice Questions | GED Study Guide

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How to Pass the GED

How to Pass the GED

Extended Response: Example 1

Extended Response: Example 3

Basics The second section of Reasoning Through Language Arts evaluates your ability to integrate reading and writing by way of a 45-minute Extended Response. GED guidelines specify that you will be asked to write an essay about the best-supported position—the most persuasive side of an argument—presented in two passages with opposing points of view.  Accordingly, you will need to produce evidence supporting the most convincing position from either Passage I or Passage II.  Attention to specific details within the passages will help you find the necessary pieces of evidence.

GED.com has excellent resources to help prepare for the Extended Response as follows: • poster • videos • guidelines – english • guidelines – spanish • quick tips – english • quick tips – spanish • practice passages – english • practice passages – spanish

Here, at HowtoPasstheGED.com, a five-paragraph essay will be used as a framework for writing an Extended Response.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Outline Paragraph 1:  Introduction of your position with three supporting points. Paragraph 2:  Discussion of first point. Paragraph 3:  Discussion of second point. Paragraph 4:  Discussion of third point. Paragraph 5:  Summary and Conclusion of your position and its three supporting points.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Choose (Before You Write) • Read Passage I and Passage II. • Choose the best-supported position. • Select three points supporting this position.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Beginner Level (You’re Up and Running!) • Write the first sentence of each of the five paragraphs. • In paragraph 1, introduce your position and its three supporting points. • In paragraph 2, put down the first point. • In paragraph 3, put down the second point. • In paragraph 4, put down the third point. • In paragraph 5, restate your position and its three supporting points.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Intermediate Level (You’re Adding On!) • In paragraph 1, introduce your position and its three supporting points. • In paragraph 2, write at least three sentences about the first point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 3, write at least three sentences about the second point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 4, write at least three sentences about the third point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 5, restate your position and its three supporting points, including coming to a conclusion about them.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Advanced Level (Polish Your Essay If You Have Time) • In paragraph 1, introduce your position and its three supporting points. • In paragraph 2, write at least three sentences about the first point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 3, write at least three sentences about the second point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 4, write at least three sentences about the third point, including mentioning something from the other side. • In paragraph 5, restate your position and its three supporting points, including coming to a conclusion about them.

The example below goes over the process of writing a five-paragraph essay as an Extended Response to Passage I versus Passage II.

Passage I Working from Home is Beneficial

Some experts say there’s no going back now that both employers and workers have learned that telework can be effective.

“The pandemic has radically changed how we view telework or remote work,” said Timothy Golden, a professor of management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “Many individuals and companies have realized that we can work remotely effectively. And so, I think remote work is here to stay.”

“We are going to err on the side of letting more people work remotely for longer periods of time,” said Ravi Gajendran, chair of the Department of Global Leadership and Management in the College of Business at Florida International University.

“When that’s not working as well,” added Gajendran, “the pendulum will sort of swing slightly back towards the office. It’s not going to come back to what it was previously, but what we’re going to find is, as new employees join, as new teams form, and as people who have not worked together before are now working remotely, things are not going to be as smooth.”

But, said Golden, “We know that many employees have been highly productive during the pandemic and have been able to carry on their work in a fashion that was consistent with their productivity before the pandemic.”

According to Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership, remote work has led to more authentic moments between co-workers who’ve ended up meeting a colleague’s pets or families online, as the pandemic provided a virtual window, and therefore greater insight, into a co-worker’s personal side than working at the office ever did.

“You’ve seen many large companies, and in different industries, make announcements about the future of their workforce in how it is likely to be hybrid. And some workers will be working remotely on a permanent basis, and others will be in a hybrid form,” pointed out Golden. “Companies that do this right and do this in the right way, will have a competitive advantage over those who do not.”

Increased telework could free employees from having to live close to where they work. That could also benefit employers who won’t have to be limited to the local talent pool. More jobs could go to places with lower costs of living and ultimately, overseas.

“It could go to Asia or Africa or South America,” said Gajendran.

With more employees working remotely from home, employers could reduce their costs further by cutting back on office space. – adapted from VOA (04/09/2021, 04/12/2021, 04/29/21)

Passage II Working from Home is Harmful

The benefits of working from home—including skipping a long commute and having a better work-life balance—have been well documented, but employees are literally paying for the privilege, according to a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research.

“People need to dedicate space to work from home,” said Christopher Stanton, an Associate Professor at Harvard Business School who co-authored the study. “For many folks who lived in small apartments or houses before the pandemic, working from home wasn’t a a realistic long-term solution unless they could upgrade to larger apartments or houses.”

The researchers analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau to reach their conclusions. They found that between 2013 and 2017, households with at least one teleworker spent on average more of their income on rent or a mortgage to pay for the extra room needed to work from home.

“A household that was spending about $1,000 a month on rent would be spending around $1,070 on rent. So, it’s about a 7% increase, on average, across the income distribution,” Stanton said.

The researchers estimate that about 10% of people who worked in an office before the pandemic could permanently transition to working from home full time. A recent Upwork survey suggests that 36 million Americans will be working remotely by 2025—an 87% increase over pre-pandemic levels, and these workers could potentially take on the additional costs.

The added expense is easier for high-income households to bear but puts an increased burden on workers who earn less money.

“You might have gotten an increase of 20-ish percent in housing expenses for lower-income households with remote workers compared to lower-income households without remote workers,” Stanton said. “That’s a pretty big chunk of expenditure for those households in the bottom half of the income distribution.”

Kristen Carpenter, chief psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Ohio State University, added that at-home, remote work causes more work to be performed outside normal business hours, so it’s hard “to draw a boundary that prevents work from being ever-present,” including nights and weekends.

Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership, also pointed out that when people work from home, “they kind of get stuck in this little place,” whereas going back to the office leads to more interpersonal interaction and innovation. – adapted from VOA (04/09/2021, 04/12/2021, 04/29/21)

Prompt Passage I finds working from home to be beneficial; Passage II finds working from home to be harmful. In your response, analyze the positions presented in Passage I and Passage II to determine which passage is best supported. Use relevant and specific evidence to back your choice. You have 45 minutes to plan, type, and edit your response.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Choose (Before You Write) • Read Passage I and Passage II. • Choose the best-supported position. In this example, Passage I is chosen as the best-supported position. • Select three points supporting this position. (1) Working from home is productive. (2) Working from home improves employee interaction. (3) Working from home saves money.

Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.

Working from home is productive.

Working from home improves employee interaction.

Working from home saves money.

In summary, Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.

Working from home is productive.  Passage I uses the pandemic to make the relevant observation that individuals and companies realized they could work remotely effectively.  Many employees have been highly productive this way and can stay this way.  Passage II admits in its very first sentence that the benefits of working from home have been well documented. 

Working from home improves employee interaction.  Passage I is persuasive when it notes that remote work has led to “more authentic moments” between co-workers.  However, workers still have the option of working at the office, as well as at home, in a hybrid form.  Thus, Passage II is incorrect when it claims remote workers get stuck in one place.

Working from home saves money.  Passage I makes a convincing argument for freedom.  It asserts that remote work frees employees from having to live close to office buildings.  It also frees employers from having to pay for as much office space.  Passage II says employees need to spend some money to outfit a home office, but this is less costly than commuting.

In summary, Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.  In conclusion, there is no place like home.

Working from home is productive.  Passage I uses an authority—Timothy Golden, a professor of management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—to make the following relevant observation: “The pandemic has radically changed how we view telework or remote work.  Many individuals and companies have realized that we can work remotely effectively.  We know that many employees have been highly productive during the pandemic and have been able to carry on their work in a fashion that was consistent with their productivity before the pandemic.  And so, I think remote work is here to stay.”  Passage II admits that at least some of what Golden said is true by stating in its very first sentence “the benefits of working from home—including skipping a long commute and having a better work-life balance—have been well documented.” 

Working from home improves employee interaction.  Passage I effectively uses another expert—Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership—to state that remote work has led to “more authentic moments between co-workers who’ve ended up meeting a colleague’s pets or families online, as the pandemic provided a virtual window, and therefore greater insight, into a co-worker’s personal side than working at the office ever did.”  Although Passage II says people who work from home “kind of get stuck in this little place,” Golden affirms that workers aren’t really stuck, because some will be working in a hybrid form, meaning partly at home and partly in an office.

Working from home saves money.  Passage I makes a convincing argument for freedom.  Remote work saves money by freeing employees from having to live close to office buildings and freeing employers from having to pay for as much office space.  According to Christopher Stanton (Associate Professor at Harvard Business School) in Passage II, employees need to spend some money to outfit their apartments or houses with a home office, but this is a small price to pay compared to avoiding a costly daily commute.

In summary, Passage I is the best-supported position because working from home is productive, improves employee interaction, and saves money.  In particular, Passage I leads to the conclusion that working from home is beneficial in that it leaves nobody out: Both employers and employees stand to gain.

Remember, the RLA Extended Response is based on what YOU determine to be the best-supported position presented in either Passage I or Passage II. In order to demonstrate that YOU have room to maneuver, the example below goes over the process of writing a five-paragraph essay as an Extended Response to Passage I versus Passage II with a different choice.

Prior to the pandemic, about 5 million Americans worked remotely. But COVID-19 forced U.S. employers to allow telework on a massive scale, resulting in an estimated 75 million people working from home over the past year.

Five-Paragraph Essay – Choose (Before You Write) • Read Passage I and Passage II. • Choose the best-supported position. In this example, Passage II is chosen as the best-supported position. • Select three points supporting this position. (1) Working from home is unproductive. (2) Working from home hampers employee interaction. (3) Working from home costs money.

Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.

Working from home is unproductive.

Working from home hampers employee interaction.

Working from home costs money.

In summary, Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.

Working from home is unproductive.  Backed by facts, Passage II is able to make a strong statement when it says working in small setups at home ultimately ends up in fatigue and less productive employees.  In fact, fifty-four percent of home workers feel overworked and 39% are exhausted.  Passage I has no numbers to back up its claim that people can work remotely effectively.

Working from home hampers employee interaction.  Passage II cleverly notes that when people work from home, they get stuck.  Going back to the office leads to more interpersonal interaction and innovation.  Passage I even admits that working from home doesn’t always work well, meaning that people end up back in the office.

Working from home costs money.  Passage II convincingly has money in mind when it states that households with at least one teleworker have to spend some of their income to pay for the extra room needed to work from home.  Lower-income households need to spend even more of their income to set things up at home.  Passage I offers no solutions for employees paying out of pocket to work from home.

In summary, Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.  In conclusion, there are places other than home.

Working from home is unproductive.  Passage II comes out swinging with Christopher Stanton, an Associate Professor at Harvard Business School, who asserts having nonergonomic setups in small places [at home] ultimately ends up “leading to fatigue and wear and tear and less productive employees in the long run.”  In fact, “fifty-four percent of people who’ve worked from home this past year feel overworked, and 39% say they’re downright exhausted.”  Although Timothy Golden (professor of management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) claims in Passage I that “many individuals and companies have realized that we can work remotely effectively,” he has no real numbers to back him up.

Working from home hampers employee interaction.  Passage II cites another authority—Cathleen Swody, an organizational psychologist at Thrive Leadership—to point out that people who work from home “kind of get stuck in this little place.”  She goes on to convincingly argue that “going back to the office leads to more interpersonal interaction and innovation.”  In Passage I, Ravi Gajendran, chair of the Department of Global Leadership and Management in the College of Business at Florida International University, even admits that working from home doesn’t always work well, such that “the pendulum will sort of swing” back towards the office.

Working from home costs money.  Passage II hits home with data from the U.S. Census Bureau, which found that “between 2013 and 2017, households with at least one teleworker spent on average more of their income on rent or a mortgage to pay for the extra room needed to work from home.”  Stanton adds that “you might have gotten an increase of 20-ish percent in housing expenses for lower-income households with remote workers compared to lower-income households without remote workers, a pretty big chunk of expenditure for those households in the bottom half of the income distribution.”  Passage I offers no solutions for employees “literally paying for the privilege” of working from home.

In summary, Passage II is the best-supported position because working from home is unproductive, hampers employee interaction, and costs money.  In particular, Passage II leads to the conclusion that working from home can be so harmful that it never stops, becoming an “ever-present” task performed outside normal business hours without a boundary.

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GED Practice Test

GED Essay Sample Response

Below is a sample response to our GED Essay Practice Question . Review this response to develop familiarity with the structure of a high-scoring essay. You may notice that this essay follows the template that’s featured in our GED Essay Writing Guide . At the end of this response, there is a short commentary that explains why this is an effective essay and why it would receive a perfect score.

The writer of the pro-recycling passage, unlike the writer of the anti-recycling passage, employs excellent logical reasoning to convince the audience, explaining that recycling is more than simply placing paper and plastic in their proper bins; it is an “involved process of harvesting, transporting, building and shipping.” The author proves that recycling is logical by detailing how much waste is produced when goods are created from scratch, driving home her logical argument with the simple question: “Why cut down a forest instead of recycling paper?”

To lend even more credibility to her already logical argument, the writer includes statistics relevant to recycling. In a clear, bullet-pointed list of data showing the importance of recycling, she provides relevant and useful information: “It takes 95% less energy to recycle aluminum than it does to make it from raw materials.” Recycling aluminum is worth the effort because making new aluminum is less efficient, and the writer has data to prove it. The writer goes on to list four more pieces of data to support her argument while the writer of the other passage only provides one.

Finally, the writer’s purposeful ethical plea in the pro-recycling passage more effectively calls the audience to action. By writing, “It is the morally sound thing to do to protect our beautiful planet for future generations,” the writer conjures images of clear blue skies and clean shining seas, helping the reader emotionally connect to the argument. If we do not recycle, the writer implies, we will be committing a sin against future generations. The writer finishes her argument with a passionate and motivating plea to the audience: “Please make sure you recycle!”

  Commentary

This sample essay would receive a perfect score on the GED. The writer clearly reviewed the prompt and outlined the argument before writing. Generally, the response exhibits the following organization:

  • Paragraph 1 — Introduction
  • Paragraph 2 — Logical reasoning
  • Paragraph 3 — Statistics
  • Paragraph 4 — Ethics
  • Paragraph 5 — Conclusion

The introduction clearly previews the passage’s topic, explains both sides, and demonstrates that the student understands each writer’s argument. The student uses strong, clear language and concludes with a bold thesis statement that lists three reasons why the argument he or she chose is “better-supported.”

In the body paragraphs, the student demonstrates a strong command of each of the scoring criteria:

  • Analysis of Arguments and Use of Evidence: The student quotes multiple sections of the passage to support each point, demonstrating a clear understanding of the material presented.
  • Development of Ideas and Structure: The student develops coherent organization by focusing on a supporting reason in each body paragraph and providing transitions like “In addition to” and “Finally” to help the paragraphs flow together.
  • Clarity and Command of Standard English: The sentence structure is varied and effective, and the author maintains proper spelling and grammar throughout.

Finally, the passage concludes with a brief concession to the opposing side, showing an ability to recognize the complexity of the issue, before wrapping up the discussion with a summation of why the pro-recycling passage is better-supported than the anti-recycling passage.

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GED Practice Questions

GED Essay Prompt

The articles below present arguments from supporters and critics of police militarization.

In your essay, analyze both articles to determine which position is best supported. Use relevant and specific evidence from both articles to support your response.

Type your essay. You should expect to spend up to 45 minutes planning, drafting, and editing your response.

News reports frequently show police wearing helmets and masks, wielding assault rifles, and riding in mine-resistant armored vehicles. These are not isolated incidents—they represent a nationwide trend of police militarization. Federal programs providing surplus military equipment have equipped police officers with firepower that is far beyond what is needed for their jobs as protectors of their communities. Sending a heavily armed team of officers to perform routine police work can dangerously escalate situations that never needed to involve violence in the first place.

Throughout the United States, heavily armed SWAT teams are raiding people’s homes in the middle of the night, often just to search for drugs. Military-style police raids have increased dramatically in recent years, with one report finding over 80,000 such raids last year. It should enrage us that people have needlessly died during these raids, that pets have been shot, and that homes have been ravaged. Sometimes children are in the crossfire—often with deadly results.

Our neighborhoods are not warzones, and the police should not be treating us like wartime enemies. And yet, every year, billions of dollars’ worth of military equipment flows from the federal government to local police departments. The main beneficiaries of this militarization are military contractors who now have another lucrative market in which to sell their products. Companies like Lockheed Martin and Blackhawk Industries are making record profits by selling their equipment to local police departments that have received Department of Homeland Security grants.

Police departments use these wartime weapons in everyday policing, especially to fight the wasteful and failed drug war, which has unfairly targeted people of color. According to a recent ACLU report, “of all the incidents studied where the number and race of the people impacted were known, 39 percent were Black, 11 percent were Latino, 20 were white.” The majority of raids that targeted blacks and Latinos were related to drugs—another metric exposing how the “war on drugs” is racist to the core.

The Truth about Police Militarization

by David Hagner

Over the last few years the role of police in American society has increasingly drawn harsh criticism. Much is made of the militarization of police, from their acquisition and use of surplus military equipment, their training with and adopting similar tactics to the military, and intrusive search procedures. These criticisms are disproportionate and do not take into account the everyday facts of policing, including:

  • The nature of the threat has changed: Terrorist attacks on American soil have risen in frequency. Though none have been as destructive as those of 9/11, many more recent attacks have occurred at the local level and have to be confronted by police. When these incidents occur, officers need the best available equipment in order to neutralize heavily armed opponents before they can inflict serious harm on civilians.
  • There is little evidence that new procedures have increased causalities: Statistics of police killings of civilians do not show any significant increase, while deaths of officers in the line of duty are at an all-time low, indicating the newer procedures have helped save lives.
  • The vast majority of police-civilian interactions are peaceful: Criticisms about the overuse of SWAT teams and officers decked out in military gear ignore the fact that most officers patrol the streets in standard uniforms and interact peacefully with multiple civilians during a given day. Rates of violent crime are down in most parts of the country. Violent confrontations are the exception, not the rule.
  • Taking valuable tools away from police officers endangers lives: The stability of police shootings of civilians, the decline in violent crime, and the decline in police officer fatalities all suggest that current procedures are working. If officers lose the tactics and equipment they have come to rely on, these trends could be adversely affected and officers could be put in harm’s way without adequate protection.

Police exist to serve their communities, and while accusations of over-militarization are exaggerated, officers do still need to focus heavily on community outreach and dialogue. The only way misconceptions can be corrected is through transparency, so civilians can see and understand why certain approaches are warranted.

Write your essay and then review our sample response!

GED Sample Essay >>

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CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS - JULY 08: A view of Harvard Yard on the campus of Harvard University on ... [+] July 08, 2020 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have sued the Trump administration for its decision to strip international college students of their visas if all of their courses are held online. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

The college essay is a pivotal piece of the college application showcasing your individuality and differentiated outlook to admissions officers. What makes an essay truly shine? Let’s dive into the words behind three standout essays highlighted by university websites and a school newspaper's brand studio so you can get into the right mindset for crafting your own narrative.

Embracing Differences: Finding Strength In Uniqueness

Essay Excerpt: ‘Bra Shopping ’ (Harvard)

Featured by the Harvard Crimson Brand Studio , Orlee's essay recounts a student's humorous and insightful experience of bra shopping with her grandmother, weaving in her unique family dynamics and challenges at her prestigious school.

What Works:

  • Humor and Honesty: The student's humor makes the essay enjoyable to read, while her honesty about her challenges adds depth.
  • Self-Awareness: She demonstrates a strong sense of self-awareness, embracing her uniqueness rather than trying to fit in.
  • Resilience: Her narrative highlights resilience and the ability to find strength in differences.

For Your Essay : To write an essay that embraces your uniqueness, start by identifying a quirky or challenging experience that reflects who a key insight into your experience. Think about how this experience has shaped your perspective and character. Use humor and honesty to bring your story to life, and focus on how you have embraced your differences to become stronger and more resilient.

Best High-Yield Savings Accounts Of 2024

Best 5% interest savings accounts of 2024, finding connections: humor and self-reflection.

Essay: ‘Brood X Cicadas ’ (Hamilton College)

As an example on Hamilton's admissions website, Nicholas writes about the cicadas swarming his hometown every 17 years and draws a parallel between their emergence and his own transition to college life. He uses humor and self-reflection to create a relatable and engaging narrative.

  • Humor: Nicholas uses humor to make his essay entertaining and memorable. His witty comparisons between himself and cicadas add a unique twist.
  • Self-Reflection: By comparing his life to the cicadas’, he reflects on his own growth and readiness for change.
  • Relatability: His narrative about facing new experiences and challenges resonates with readers who have undergone similar transitions.

For Your Essay: To infuse humor and self-reflection into your essay, start by identifying an ordinary experience or object and think about how it relates to your life. Write down funny or insightful observations about this connection. Use humor to make your essay more engaging, but ensure it still conveys meaningful self-reflection. This balance can make your essay both entertaining and profound.

Persistence and Multicultural Identity: Life Lessons From Tortilla Making

Essay: ‘ Facing The Hot Griddle ’ (Johns Hopkins University)

In this essay published by Hopkins Insider, Rocio uses the process of making tortillas to explore her multicultural identity and the challenges she has faced. Her story beautifully weaves together her Guatemalan heritage and her experiences growing up in the United States.

  • Metaphor and Symbolism: The process of making tortillas becomes a powerful metaphor for the student’s journey and struggles. The symbolism of the masa harina and water mixing parallels her blending of cultural identities.
  • Personal Growth: The essay highlights her perseverance and adaptability, qualities that are crucial for success in college.
  • Cultural Insight: She provides a rich, personal insight into her multicultural background, making her story unique and compelling.

For Your Essay: To write an essay that explores your identity through a metaphor, start by thinking about an activity or tradition that holds significant meaning for you. Consider how this activity relates to your life experiences and personal growth. Use detailed descriptions to bring the activity to life and draw connections between the process and your own journey. Reflect on the lessons you've learned and how they've shaped your identity.

A winning college essay isn’t simply about parading your best accomplishment or dramatizing your challenges. It’s not a contest for which student is the most original or entertaining. Rather, the essay is a chance for you to showcase your authenticity, passion, resilience, social awareness, and intellectual vitality . By sharing genuine stories and insights, you can create an essay that resonates with admissions committees and highlights your unique qualities.

For you to have the best possible essay, mindset is key. Here’s how to get into the zone:

  • Reflect Deeply: Spend time thinking about your experiences, challenges, and passions. Journaling can help you uncover deep insights.
  • Discuss and Share: Talking about your stories with friends, family, or mentors can provide new perspectives and emotional clarity.
  • Immerse Yourself: Engage in activities that you are passionate about to reignite the feelings and memories associated with them.
  • Draft Freely: Don’t worry about perfection on the first try. Write freely and honestly, then refine your narrative.

The secret to a standout college essay lies in its authenticity, depth, and emotional resonance. By learning from these successful examples and getting into the right mindset, you can craft an essay that not only stands out but also provides a meaningful insight into who you are. Remember, your essay is your story—make it a piece of writing that you will always be proud of.

Dr. Aviva Legatt

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Exhibit Number 8

The essay for the canadian paper based program.

GED ®  candidates write an original essay on an assigned topic. Part II of the Language Arts, Writing Test directly measures a dimension of writing skills not tested by the multiple-choice questions.

1. ESSAY TOPICS

The essay topics present issues or situations of general interest about which adults would be expected to have some knowledge. The topics are brief and written at an appropriate reading level. In general, the topics direct GED ®  candidates to state their views and to support them with examples from their own lives or the lives of others. Topics that require a specific format, such as the argumentative or comparison/contrast essay, are avoided so that GED ® candidates with less formal training in writing are not penalized.

2. ESSAY TOPIC PROVISION AND USE

The essay topics are provided in two ways, either in the test booklet or in a topic packet, depending on the number of test batteries ordered. Official GED ® testing centers that order six (6) or fewer test batteries, special editions, or other language tests will receive topic packets.

  • If the testing center uses topic cards, take only the assigned topics and one alternative topic to the testing room. Place the topic cards in the Language Arts, Writing Test booklets. If the essay topic appears in the test booklet, take one additional booklet.
  • Parts I and II of the Language Arts, Writing Test should never be administered separately. Each candidate must have his or her own test booklet and essay topic card (if applicable) for the entire two hours.
  • Do not read the essay topic aloud except to people taking the audiocassette version of the GED ®  tests.
  • In addition to this specific information about the topic, the directions printed in the Language Arts, Writing Test booklet provide further guidance to GED ®  candidates. The directions advise candidates to be specific and to support their views. Length is not a criterion of effective writing and is not a standard for scoring the essay.
  • All GED ®  candidates must write their essays on the answer sheets and may not attach additional paper or use a second answer sheet if their essays exceed the space provided. Only the writing on the two lined pages in the answer sheet booklet will be read and scored.
  • The Language Arts, Writing Test is a two-hour test: The first 75 minutes are allotted for the multiple-choice section (Part I) and the remaining 45 minutes are for the essay section (Part II).
  • If the GED ®  candidate finishes the multiple-choice section in less than 75 minutes, he or she may begin the essay section immediately. After completing the essay section of Language Arts, Writing Test, the candidate may review and make corrections to Parts I and II if time remains.

3. EXEMPTIONS FROM AN ASSIGNED ESSAY TOPIC

In rare cases, a GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ may find a GED ®  candidate who is unable to write about an assigned essay topic because the topic is inappropriate due to a candidate’s disability, religion, or incarceration. For example, an Amish candidate may be asked to write about a modern technological device. Many Amish sects prohibit members from using advanced technology, so the candidate’s knowledge of the subject may be so limited as to diminish the opportunity to demonstrate his or her writing skills.

Under no conditions may the GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ alter a given topic or create a new one for a candidate’s use.

Where it is clear that the assigned essay topic is not appropriate for a GED ®  candidate, an alternate essay topic may be assigned. In such cases, the GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ will do the following:

A. Assign an alternate topic in accordance with the following procedures:

  • If the essay topic is printed at random in the test booklet, issue another Language Arts, Writing Test booklet of the same test form bearing the next sequential serial number. For example, the GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ would exchange Test Form IA, serial 00001 for Test Form IA, serial 00002. If no other test booklets of the same form are available, a Language Arts, Writing Test booklet of a different test form may be used, provided it neither contains the same essay topic nor has been used by the candidate in previous testing.
  • At testing centers where essay topic cards are in use, issue the next sequential essay topic appearing on the Topic Rotation List. For example, the GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ would take back Topic D and, having consulted the list, issue Topic B.

B. Complete the Exemption from Assigned Topic form (Form L-60). The GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ keeps the original copy of this form and sends a copy to both the GED Administrator™ and the GED Testing Service.

Because of the potential for abuse of this policy, the GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ must keep a file of all exemptions granted at his or her official GED ®  testing center. The GED Administrator™ will also monitor patterns and numbers of objections to topics raised by GED ®  candidates.

At GED Testing Service, the operations director will also monitor objections.

4. ESSAY SCORE

Neither the individual essay score nor the multiple-choice score may be separately provided to any candidate. The score from the Language Arts, Writing Test is a combination of the two parts.

5. GUIDELINES FOR TEST CENTERS, ESSAY SCORING SITES, AND JURISDICTIONAL ADMINISTRATORS FOR HANDLING GED ®  ESSAYS OF A SENSITIVE NATURE

In general, every effort must be made to keep GED Testing Service essays and essay topics secure. However, situations occasionally arise when a candidate’s essay contains content that threatens suicide or violence, discusses criminal activity, or otherwise addresses issues of a sensitive nature that give the reader a legitimate basis for concern. In these cases, examiners, test center personnel, GED Testing Service trained essay readers, and jurisdictional administrators will need to decide whether any actions are warranted given the content of the essay. When deemed appropriate, oral and written notification should be given to state legal authorities and to relevant GED ®  personnel. Such notification should be made promptly upon discovering the sensitive nature of the essay.

CONCERNS REGARDING SENSITIVE ESSAYS SHOULD BE SHARED ONLY WITH THOSE INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE A LEGITIMATE NEED TO RECEIVE SUCH INFORMATION.

NOTE:  Notifications to GED Testing Service should be directed to GEDTS Technology Operations at  [email protected] .

a. GED ®  Testing Centers

If a testing administrator or proctor believes that a candidate’s essay response suggests an intention to commit suicide, to cause harm to the candidate or others, or to damage property or commit other crimes (including acts or threats of terrorism), or that the writer has been the victim of abuse or an assault by another:

  • The testing officer should immediately notify the jurisdictional administrator, orally and in writing, and copy GED Testing Service with the notification.
  • If possible, the testing officer should contact someone who knows the candidate better, such as a teacher or guidance counselor, to determine if there is reason to believe that the claims or threats are real.

Most states have laws that require that certain individuals (such as school officials) report cases of neglect or abuse involving minors. While these statutes may not be applicable to individuals who review GED ®  essays, GED Testing Service believes that such cases should still be reported to a principal, guidance counselor, or the state agency assigned to protect minors.

If state authorities (police, other law enforcement officers, state’s attorney, or an officer of the court) request the original essay, the testing officer should comply with the request as long as it is contained in a valid subpoena or other appropriate legal document. Copies of the subpoena or written request must be sent immediately to the jurisdictional administrator and GED Testing Service. The testing officers must advise the jurisdictional administrator and GED Testing Service of any actions or outcomes that result from the reporting of sensitive essays.

b. GED ®  Essay Scoring Sites

If an essay reader notices that a candidate’s essay response suggests an intention to commit suicide, to cause harm to the candidate or others or to damage property or commit other crimes (including acts or threats of terrorism), or that the candidate has been the victim of abuse or an assault by another:

  • The reader should ask another reader to read the essay to see if that person shares the concern about the content.
  • The reader should share the essay with the chief reader and scoring site director.
  • The scoring site director must immediately notify the jurisdictional administrator and GED Testing Service both, orally and in writing.
  • If state authorities (police, other law enforcement officers, state’s attorney, or an officer of the court) request the original essay, the GED Chief Examiner™ should comply with the request as long as it is contained in a valid subpoena or other appropriate legal document. Copies of the subpoena or written request must be sent immediately to the jurisdictional administrator and GED Testing Service.
  • The scoring site director must advise the jurisdictional administrator and GED Testing Service of any actions or outcomes that result from the reporting of sensitive essays.

c. GED Jurisdictional Administrators™

If a jurisdictional administrator receives a sensitive essay from a GED® testing center or GED® essay scoring site, the administrator should:

  • Contact the jurisdiction’s internal legal department for advice, including advice on complying with any applicable state or provincial laws.
  • Act upon the advice of the jurisdiction’s legal department and if appropriate, contact the state’s/province’s agency that protects minors (if the candidate is under age 18).
  • Comply with any subpoena or other appropriate legal document if state authorities (police, other law enforcement officers, state’s attorney, or an officer of the court) request the original essay. Copies of the subpoena or other written request must be sent immediately to GED Testing Service.
  • Notify GED Testing Service, orally and in writing, of all actions or outcomes that result from the reporting of sensitive essays and provide a copy of the original essay.

IMAGES

  1. The Ultimate Guide to the 5-Paragraph Essay

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  2. 5 Paragraph GED Essay Sample

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  3. 012 Essay Example Writing Ged Practice Test Extended Response Guide

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  4. THE ULTIMATE GED ESSAY-WRITING GUIDE WITH SUPPORT AND WORD BANK by

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  5. 002 How To Write Ged Essay Example ~ Thatsnotus

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  6. GED Essay Writing Guide

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VIDEO

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  2. GED ESSAY PART III

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  5. 4 Formulas 2 Start the GED RLA Essay #shorts

  6. GED Grad Week Student Stories 2022

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write & Pass a GED Essay

    Example GED Essay. The following is an example high scoring essay: Both the press release and the letter to the editor offer positions that are supported by both fact and opinion. The press release seeks to exhort the new bill for expansion of Highway 17, while the letter argues that the passing of the bill could prove detrimental to the district.

  2. GED Sample Essay

    The following is an example of a high-scoring essay response to our free practice GED Essay Prompt. Below our GED sample essay is a brief analysis justifying its perfect score. Police militarization is a hot-button topic these days. Some believe that criticizing the actions of the police hurts their ability to do their job, while others argue ...

  3. GED Essay Writing Guide

    When you outline your GED Essay, pre-write your thesis and decide on which three forms of support you will discuss to prove that your passage is better-supported. ... For example, (insert 1 or 2 examples from Passage Y that are weak). As presented, the X position is much stronger than its counterpart because it is much better-supported and ...

  4. How to Write the GED Essay-Topics, Sample, and Tips

    GED Essay Topics. Here are a few examples of GED Essay Topics. Click on the title to read a full stimulus and a prompt. Topic 1. An Analysis of Daylight-Saving Time. The article presents arguments from both supporters and critics of Daylight-Saving Time who disagree about the practice's impact on energy consumption and safety.

  5. GED Essay: Everything You Need To Know In 2024

    The GED essay is intimidating to many people. Writing an entire essay from scratch in 45 minutes or less may seem difficult, but it does not have to be. This GED essay writing overview will help you prepare for and learn about the written section of the exam.In this post, Get-TestPrep will show everything you need to know about GED essays, including their structure, sample topics, tips, and ...

  6. How To Write The GED Essay 2024 (Extended Response)

    The best strategy for writing the GED essay is: Read the passages (5 minutes) Analyze the data and create an outline (5 minutes) Write your extended response (30 minutes) Reread and edit your writing (5 minutes) If you want a clear example of what your GED essay should like like, later in this blog you'll find a sample.

  7. Extended Response

    Use these free videos, guidelines and examples to prepare and practice for the essay section of the Language Arts test. Videos: How to write a great GED extended response Overview of the GED Extended Response Format (1:28)

  8. GED Essay

    There are is now an extended response (essay) question on the GED Reasoning Through Language Arts Test (RLA). You are given 45 minutes to type your GED Essay on the RLA test. Read through our tips and strategies, use our sample prompt to write out a practice essay, and then examine our essay examples to gauge your strengths and weaknesses. GED.

  9. GED Essay Question

    This is simply an essay question. You will have 45 minutes to type your answer. This is a tricky part of the GED test, so it's very important to familiarize yourself with this task ahead of time. First read our essay guide and then review our sample question. Try typing out your own essay before you look at our sample response.

  10. PDF See a Perfect Scoring GED Test Extended Response

    Step 1: Read the instructions for the Extended Response task. Step 2: Read the two passages. Step 3: Review the sample extended response that received full score points (6 points out of 6 possible) Step 4: Understand the reasons why the response received full score points. Step 1: Read the instructions.

  11. GED Extended Response Essay Prompts & Examples

    GED writing practice tests and Tips to succeed in writing your essay with only 45 minutes to complete. Practice tests to improve your GED score. Start now! A Quick Guide to Writing an Extended Response to the GED Language Arts Test. This test will check how well you create arguments and use evidence. Also, it would also test your clarity and command of Standard English language.

  12. Contemporary's GED Language Arts, Writing

    Below are an essay topic and four sample essays with the holistic scores they received from the GED Testing Service. Readers may use these samples as they familiarize themselves with the Essay Scoring Guide. Notice that there is no required minimum number of words. The essays with higher scores have are a clear organization of ideas and contain ...

  13. GED Essay Tips & Strategies

    Writing Guidelines. Rely upon these timing guidelines as you write your GED essay: PLAN — Spend 10 minutes reading the source material and organizing your essay response. PRODUCE — Spend 30 minutes writing your (ideally) 5-paragraph essay. PROOFREAD — Save 5 minutes for re-reading what you wrote and making necessary changes and improvements.

  14. PDF Preparing for the GED Essay

    This section of the book presents a simple strategy for writing a passing GED essay. The GED Language Arts, Writing Test has two parts. Part I, Editing, is a multiple-choice section covering organization, sentence structure, usage, and mechanics. The first part of this book will help you pass Part I of the test.

  15. GED Essay Practice Question

    GED Essay Practice Question. As a part of the GED Reasoning Through Language Arts test, there is a 45-minute extended response question. For this question, two articles are presented that discuss a topic and take opposing positions. You are required to write an essay arguing that one of the positions is better-supported than the other.

  16. PDF Sample Extended Response Passages and Prompts for Classroom Practice

    A 2012 report on game-based learning notes that "there is research evidence demonstrating positive impact on higher order skills such as decision making and problem solving.". The report adds that using video games can also reduce training time, an advantage for both managers and employees.

  17. Extended Response: Example 1

    Here, at HowtoPasstheGED.com, a five-paragraph essay will be used as a framework for writing an Extended Response. Five-Paragraph Essay - Outline. Paragraph 1: Introduction of your position with three supporting points. Paragraph 2: Discussion of first point. Paragraph 3: Discussion of second point.

  18. GED Essay Sample Response

    Commentary. This sample essay would receive a perfect score on the GED. The writer clearly reviewed the prompt and outlined the argument before writing. Generally, the response exhibits the following organization: Paragraph 1 — Introduction. Paragraph 2 — Logical reasoning. Paragraph 3 — Statistics. Paragraph 4 — Ethics.

  19. Language Arts Extended Response

    Use these free videos, guidelines and examples to prepare and practice for the essay section of the Language Arts test. Videos: How to write a great GED extended response Overview of the GED Extended Response Format (1:28)

  20. PDF GED Practice Essay

    GED Practice Essay The passages present arguments for and against an office installing instant messaging software. Write a response analyzing the arguments in both passages and determining which argument is stronger. Use relevant and specific evidence from the passages to support your response. Take approximately 45 minutes to write your response.

  21. GED Essay Prompt

    GED Essay Prompt. The articles below present arguments from supporters and critics of police militarization. In your essay, analyze both articles to determine which position is best supported. Use relevant and specific evidence from both articles to support your response. Type your essay.

  22. College Essays That Worked And How Yours Can Too

    Humor and Honesty: The student's humor makes the essay enjoyable to read, while her honesty about her challenges adds depth. Self-Awareness: She demonstrates a strong sense of self-awareness ...

  23. PDF Argumentative Writing Workbook

    A thesis statement makes a claim or proposition that reflects a specific point of view. The thesis statement should recognize both sides of a question, yet focus on two to three specific points (discussion points) sometimes called points of analyses. A thesis statement is the roadmap for the written response.

  24. PDF Common Data Elements

    ☐High school diploma is required and GED is accepted ☐High school diploma is required and GED is not accepted ☐High school diploma or equivalent is not required. C4. Does your institution require or recommend a general college-preparatory program for degree-seeking students? ☐Require ☐Recommend ☐Neither require nor recommend. C5.

  25. Exhibit 8-PROCEDURES FOR THE PAPER BASED ESSAY

    A. Assign an alternate topic in accordance with the following procedures: If the essay topic is printed at random in the test booklet, issue another Language Arts, Writing Test booklet of the same test form bearing the next sequential serial number. For example, the GED Chief Examiner™ or GED Examiner™ would exchange Test Form IA, serial ...